convert pdf to jpg c# itextsharp : Secure pdf file application Library cloud html asp.net wpf class Official%20Python%20Manual%20of%20Python%202.7.6%206-part1862

Port-Specific Changes: FreeBSD
FreeBSD 7.1’s 
SO_SETFIB
constant, used with 
getsockopt()
/
setsockopt()
to select
an alternate routing table, is now available in the 
socket
module. (Added by Kyle
VanderBeek; issue 8235.)
Other Changes and Fixes
Two benchmark scripts, 
iobench
and 
ccbench
, were added to the 
Tools
directory.
iobench
measures the speed of the built-in file I/O objects returned by 
open()
while
performing various operations, and 
ccbench
is a concurrency benchmark that tries to
measure computing throughput, thread switching  latency, and IO processing
bandwidth when performing several tasks using a varying number of threads.
The 
Tools/i18n/msgfmt.py
script now understands plural forms in 
.po
files. (Fixed
by Martin von Löwis; issue 5464.)
When importing a module from a 
.pyc
or 
.pyo
file with an existing 
.py
counterpart,
the 
co_filename
attributes of the resulting code objects are overwritten when the
original filename is obsolete. This can happen if the file has been renamed, moved,
or is accessed through different paths. (Patch by Ziga Seilnacht and Jean-Paul
Calderone; issue 1180193.)
The 
regrtest.py
script now takes a --randseed= switch that takes an integer that will
be used as the random seed for the -r option that executes tests in random order.
The -r option also reports the seed that was used (Added by Collin Winter.)
Another 
regrtest.py
switch is -j, which takes an integer specifying how many tests
run in parallel. This allows reducing the total runtime on multi-core machines. This
option is compatible with several other options, including the -R switch which is
known to produce long runtimes. (Added by Antoine Pitrou, issue 6152.) This can
also be used with a new -F switch that runs selected tests in a loop until they fail.
(Added by Antoine Pitrou; issue 7312.)
When executed as a script, the 
py_compile.py
module now accepts 
'-'
as an
argument, which will read standard input for the list of filenames to be compiled.
(Contributed by Piotr Ożarowski; issue 8233.)
Porting to Python 2.7
This section lists previously described changes and other bugfixes that may require
changes to your code:
The 
range()
function processes its arguments more consistently; it will now call
Secure pdf file - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
add security to pdf; pdf security remover
Secure pdf file - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
convert secure pdf to word; copy text from locked pdf
__int__()
on non-float, non-integer arguments that are supplied to it. (Fixed by
Alexander Belopolsky; issue 1533.)
The string 
format()
method changed the default precision used for floating-point and
complex numbers from 6 decimal places to 12, which matches the precision used by
str()
. (Changed by Eric Smith; issue 5920.)
Because of an optimization for the 
with
statement, the special methods 
__enter__()
and 
__exit__()
must belong to the object’s type, and cannot be directly attached to
the object’s instance. This affects new-style classes (derived from 
object
) and C
extension types. (issue 6101.)
Due to a bug in Python 2.6, the exc_value parameter to 
__exit__()
methods was
often the string representation of the exception, not an instance. This was fixed in
2.7, so exc_value will be an instance as expected. (Fixed by Florent Xicluna; issue
7853.)
When a restricted set of attributes were set using 
__slots__
, deleting an unset
attribute would not raise 
AttributeError
as you would expect. Fixed by Benjamin
Peterson; issue 7604.)
In the standard library:
Operations  with 
datetime
instances that resulted in a year falling outside the
supported range didn’t always raise 
OverflowError
. Such errors are now checked
more carefully and will now raise the exception. (Reported by Mark Leander, patch
by Anand B. Pillai and Alexander Belopolsky; issue 7150.)
When  using 
Decimal
instances  with  a  string’s 
format()
method, the default
alignment was previously left-alignment. This has been changed to right-alignment,
which might change the output of your programs. (Changed by Mark Dickinson;
issue 6857.)
Comparisons involving a signaling NaN value (or 
sNAN
) now signal 
InvalidOperation
instead of silently returning a true or false value depending on the comparison
operator. Quiet NaN values (or 
NaN
) are now hashable. (Fixed by Mark Dickinson;
issue 7279.)
The ElementTree library, 
xml.etree
, no longer escapes ampersands and angle
brackets when outputting an XML processing instruction (which looks like <?xml-
stylesheet href=”#style1”?>) or comment (which looks like <!– comment –>). (Patch
by Neil Muller; issue 2746.)
The 
readline()
method of 
StringIO
objects now does nothing when a negative
length is requested, as other file-like objects do. (issue 7348).
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
can receive the unlocked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go! Web Security. When you upload a file it is transmitted using a secure connection
secure pdf; convert locked pdf to word doc
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security. When you upload a file it is transmitted using a secure connection
create secure pdf; cannot print pdf security
The 
syslog
module will now use the value of 
sys.argv[0]
as the identifier instead of
the previous default value of 
'python'
. (Changed by Sean Reifschneider; issue
8451.)
The 
tarfile
module’s default error handling has changed, to no longer suppress
fatal errors. The default error level was previously 0, which meant that errors would
only result in a message being written to the debug log, but because the debug log is
not activated by default, these errors go unnoticed. The default error level is now 1,
which raises an exception if there’s an error. (Changed by Lars Gustäbel; issue
7357.)
The 
urlparse
module’s 
urlsplit()
now handles unknown URL schemes in a fashion
compliant with RFC 3986: if the URL is of the form 
"<something>://..."
, the text
before the 
://
is treated as the scheme, even if it’s a made-up scheme that the
module doesn’t know about. This change may break code that worked around the old
behaviour. For example, Python 2.6.4 or 2.5 will return the following:
>>> import urlparse
>>> urlparse.urlsplit('invented://host/filename?query')
('invented', '', '//host/filename?query', '', '')
Python 2.7 (and Python 2.6.5) will return:
>>> import urlparse
>>> urlparse.urlsplit('invented://host/filename?query')
('invented', 'host', '/filename?query', '', '')
(Python 2.7 actually produces slightly different output, since it returns a named tuple
instead of a standard tuple.)
For C extensions:
C extensions that use integer format codes with the 
PyArg_Parse*
family of functions
will now raise a 
TypeError
exception instead of triggering a 
DeprecationWarning
(issue 5080).
Use 
the 
new 
PyOS_string_to_double()
function  instead  of  the  old
PyOS_ascii_strtod()
and 
PyOS_ascii_atof()
functions, which are now deprecated.
For applications that embed Python:
The 
PySys_SetArgvEx()
function was added, letting applications close a security hole
when the existing 
PySys_SetArgv()
function was used. Check whether you’re calling
PySys_SetArgv()
and carefully consider whether the application should be using
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
XDoc.PDF SDK provides users secure methods to protect PDF document. C# users can set password to PDF and set PDF file permissions to protect PDF document.
change pdf document security; change pdf document security properties
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
& thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry-standard PDF document file.
decrypt pdf password online; create encrypted pdf
PySys_SetArgvEx()
with updatepath set to false.
Acknowledgements
The author would like to thank the following people for offering suggestions, corrections
and assistance with various drafts of this article: Nick Coghlan, Philip Jenvey, Ryan
Lovett, R. David Murray, Hugh Secker-Walker.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » What’s New in Python »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
RaterEdge HTML5 PDF Editor also provides C#.NET users secure solutions for PDF document enable C#.NET users to perform more actions to set PDF file permission.
decrypt pdf file; decrypt pdf without password
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
& thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry-standard Word document file.
creating a secure pdf document; add security to pdf document
index
modules |
next |
previous |
What’s New in Python 2.6
Author:
A.M. Kuchling (amk at amk.ca)
This article explains the new features in Python 2.6, released on October 1 2008. The
release schedule is described in PEP 361.
The major theme of Python 2.6 is preparing the migration path to Python 3.0, a major
redesign of the language. Whenever possible, Python 2.6 incorporates new features and
syntax from 3.0 while remaining compatible with existing code by not removing older
features or syntax. When it’s not possible to do that, Python 2.6 tries to do what it can,
adding compatibility functions in a 
future_builtins
module and a -3 switch to warn about
usages that will become unsupported in 3.0.
Some significant new packages have been added to the standard library, such as the
multiprocessing
and 
json
modules, but there aren’t many new features that aren’t
related to Python 3.0 in some way.
Python 2.6 also sees a number of improvements and bugfixes throughout the source. A
search through the change logs finds there were 259 patches applied and 612 bugs fixed
between Python 2.5 and 2.6. Both figures are likely to be underestimates.
This article doesn’t attempt to provide a complete specification of the new features, but
instead  provides  a  convenient overview. For full details, you should refer to the
documentation for Python 2.6. If you want to understand the rationale for the design and
implementation, refer to the PEP for a particular new feature. Whenever possible,
“What’s New in Python” links to the bug/patch item for each change.
Python 3.0
The development cycle for Python versions 2.6 and 3.0 was synchronized, with the alpha
and beta releases for both versions being made on the same days. The development of
3.0 has influenced many features in 2.6.
Python 3.0 is a far-ranging redesign of Python that breaks compatibility with the 2.x
series. This means that existing Python code will need some conversion in order to run
on Python 3.0. However, not all the changes in 3.0 necessarily break compatibility. In
cases where new features won’t cause existing code to break, they’ve been backported
to 2.6 and are described in this document in the appropriate place. Some of the 3.0-
derived features are:
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » What’s New in Python »
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry-standard PowerPoint document file.
convert locked pdf to word; create pdf the security level is set to high
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry control, you can add some additional information to generated Word file. Create Word From PDF.
creating secure pdf files; convert secure webpage to pdf
__complex__()
method for converting objects to a complex number.
Alternate syntax for catching exceptions: 
except TypeError as exc
.
The addition of 
functools.reduce()
as a synonym for the built-in 
reduce()
function.
Python 3.0 adds several new built-in functions and changes the semantics of some
existing builtins. Functions that are new in 3.0 such as 
bin()
have simply been added to
Python 2.6, but existing builtins haven’t been changed; instead, the 
future_builtins
module has versions with the new 3.0 semantics. Code written to be compatible with 3.0
can do 
from future_builtins import hex, map
as necessary.
A new command-line switch, -3, enables warnings about features that will be removed in
Python 3.0. You can run code with this switch to see how much work will be necessary to
port code to 3.0. The value of this switch is available to Python code as the boolean
variable 
sys.py3kwarning
, and to C extension code as 
Py_Py3kWarningFlag
.
See also:  The 3xxx series of PEPs, which contains proposals for Python 3.0. PEP
3000 describes the development process for Python 3.0. Start with PEP 3100 that
describes the general goals for Python 3.0, and then explore the higher-numbered
PEPS that propose specific features.
Changes to the Development Process
While 2.6 was being developed, the Python development process underwent two
significant changes: we switched from SourceForge’s issue tracker to a customized
Roundup  installation,  and  the  documentation  was  converted  from  LaTeX  to
reStructuredText.
New Issue Tracker: Roundup
For a long time, the Python developers had been growing increasingly annoyed by
SourceForge’s  bug  tracker. SourceForge’s  hosted  solution  doesn’t  permit  much
customization; for example, it wasn’t possible to customize the life cycle of issues.
The infrastructure committee of the Python Software Foundation therefore posted a call
for issue trackers, asking volunteers to set up different products and import some of the
bugs and patches from SourceForge. Four different trackers were examined: Jira,
LaunchpadRoundup, and Trac. The committee eventually settled on Jira and Roundup
as the two candidates. Jira is a commercial product that offers no-cost hosted instances
to free-software projects; Roundup is an open-source project that requires volunteers to
administer it and a server to host it.
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office signature, deleting added signature from the file, etc for text selecting in order to secure your web
secure pdf remove; copy from locked pdf
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
material includes the product (always a ZIP file). please copy and email the secure download link powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
decrypt pdf file online; change security settings pdf reader
After posting a call for volunteers, a new Roundup installation was set up at
http://bugs.python.org. One installation of Roundup can host multiple trackers, and this
server now also hosts issue trackers for Jython and for the Python web site. It will surely
find other uses in the future. Where possible, this edition of “What’s New in Python” links
to the bug/patch item for each change.
Hosting of the Python bug tracker is kindly provided by Upfront Systems of Stellenbosch,
South Africa. Martin von Loewis put a lot of effort into importing existing bugs and
patches  from  SourceForge;  his  scripts  for  this  import  operation  are  at
http://svn.python.org/view/tracker/importer/ and may be useful to other projects wishing
to move from SourceForge to Roundup.
See also:
http://bugs.python.org
The Python bug tracker.
http://bugs.jython.org:
The Jython bug tracker.
http://roundup.sourceforge.net/
Roundup downloads and documentation.
http://svn.python.org/view/tracker/importer/
Martin von Loewis’s conversion scripts.
New Documentation Format: reStructuredText Using Sphinx
The Python documentation was written using LaTeX since the project started around
1989. In the 1980s and early 1990s, most documentation was printed out for later study,
not viewed online. LaTeX was widely used because it provided attractive printed output
while remaining straightforward to write once the basic rules of the markup were learned.
Today LaTeX is still used for writing publications destined for printing, but the landscape
for programming tools has shifted. We no longer print out reams of documentation;
instead, we browse through it online and HTML has become the most important format to
support. Unfortunately, converting LaTeX to HTML is fairly complicated and Fred L.
Drake Jr., the long-time Python documentation editor, spent a lot of time maintaining the
conversion process. Occasionally people would suggest converting the documentation
into SGML and later XML, but performing a good conversion is a major task and no one
ever committed the time required to finish the job.
During the 2.6 development cycle, Georg Brandl put a lot of effort into building a new
toolchain for processing the documentation. The resulting package is called Sphinx, and
is available from http://sphinx.pocoo.org/.
Sphinx concentrates on HTML output, producing attractively styled and modern HTML;
printed output is still supported through conversion to LaTeX. The input format is
reStructuredText, a markup syntax supporting custom extensions and directives that is
commonly used in the Python community.
Sphinx is a standalone package that can be used for writing, and almost two dozen other
projects (listed on the Sphinx web site) have adopted Sphinx as their documentation tool.
See also:
Documenting Python
Describes how to write for Python’s documentation.
Sphinx
Documentation and code for the Sphinx toolchain.
Docutils
The underlying reStructuredText parser and toolset.
PEP 343: The ‘with’ statement
The previous version, Python 2.5, added the ‘
with
‘ statement as an optional feature, to
be enabled by a 
from __future__ import with_statement
directive. In 2.6 the statement
no longer needs to be specially enabled; this means that 
with
is now always a keyword.
The rest of this section is a copy of the corresponding section from the “What’s New in
Python 2.5” document; if you’re familiar with the ‘
with
‘ statement from Python 2.5, you
can skip this section.
The ‘
with
‘ statement clarifies code that previously would use 
try...finally
blocks to
ensure that clean-up code is executed. In this section, I’ll discuss the statement as it will
commonly be used. In the next section, I’ll examine the implementation details and show
how to write objects for use with this statement.
The ‘
with
‘ statement is a control-flow structure whose basic structure is:
with expression [as variable]:
with-block
The expression is evaluated, and it should result in an object that supports the context
management protocol (that is, has 
__enter__()
and 
__exit__()
methods).
The object’s 
__enter__()
is called before with-block is executed and therefore can run
set-up code. It also may return a value that is bound to the name variable, if given. (Note
carefully that variable is not assigned the result of expression.)
After execution of the with-block is finished, the object’s 
__exit__()
method is called,
even if the block raised an exception, and can therefore run clean-up code.
Some standard Python objects now support the context management protocol and can
be used with the ‘
with
‘ statement. File objects are one example:
with open('/etc/passwd''r'as f:
for line in f:
print line
... more processing code ...
After this statement has executed, the file object in f will have been automatically closed,
even if the 
for
loop raised an exception part- way through the block.
Note:  In this case, f is the same object created by 
open()
, because 
file.__enter__()
returns self.
The 
threading
module’s locks and condition variables also support the ‘
with
‘ statement:
lock = threading.Lock()
with lock:
# Critical section of code
...
The lock is acquired before the block is executed and always released once the block is
complete.
The 
localcontext()
function in the 
decimal
module makes it easy to save and restore
the current decimal context, which encapsulates the desired precision and rounding
characteristics for computations:
from decimal import Decimal, Context, localcontext
# Displays with default precision of 28 digits
= Decimal('578')
print v.sqrt()
with localcontext(Context(prec=16)):
# All code in this block uses a precision of 16 digits.
# The original context is restored on exiting the block.
print v.sqrt()
Writing Context Managers
Under the hood, the ‘
with
‘ statement is fairly complicated. Most people will only use
with
‘ in company with existing objects and don’t need to know these details, so you can
skip the rest of this section if you like. Authors of new objects will need to understand the
details of the underlying implementation and should keep reading.
A high-level explanation of the context management protocol is:
The expression is evaluated and should result in an object called a “context
manager”. The context manager must have 
__enter__()
and 
__exit__()
methods.
The  context  manager’s 
__enter__()
method  is  called. The value returned is
assigned to VAR. If no 
as VAR
clause is present, the value is simply discarded.
The code in BLOCK is executed.
If BLOCK raises an exception, the context manager’s 
__exit__()
method is called
with three arguments, the exception details (
type, value, traceback
, the same
values  returned  by 
sys.exc_info()
, which  can also be 
None
if no exception
occurred). The method’s return value controls whether an exception is re-raised: any
false value re-raises the exception, and 
True
will result in suppressing it. You’ll only
rarely want to suppress the exception, because if you do the author of the code
containing the ‘
with
‘ statement will never realize anything went wrong.
If BLOCK didn’t raise an exception, the 
__exit__()
method is still called, but type,
value, and traceback are all 
None
.
Let’s think through an example. I won’t present detailed code but will only sketch the
methods necessary for a database that supports transactions.
(For people unfamiliar with database terminology: a set of changes to the database are
grouped into a transaction. Transactions can be either committed, meaning that all the
changes are written into the database, or rolled back, meaning that the changes are all
discarded and the database is unchanged. See any database textbook for more
information.)
Let’s assume there’s an object representing a database connection. Our goal will be to let
the user write code like this:
db_connection = DatabaseConnection()
with db_connection as cursor:
cursor.execute('insert into ...')
cursor.execute('delete from ...')
# ... more operations ...
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested