convert pdf to jpg c# itextsharp : Copy from locked pdf control application utility azure web page windows visual studio Introduction%20to%20Python%20v2.12-part191

3.3c - Optional Parameters
Once you have defined a procedure, you can call it in a number of ways:
def output(grade,score=50,feedback="Well done!"):
print("You scored",score,"which is a grade",grade,feedback)
output("C")
output("A",87)
output("E",12,"Rubbish!")
You can pass as many (or few) of the parameters as you like - as long as they’re in the right order. This means you have to 
plan the procedure quite carefully.
3.3d - Functions
So far our procedures have just printed an answer to the console. Sometimes a procedure will have to send some data 
back. This is called a return. Procedures that return something are called functions. In Python that isn’t a huge 
distinction, but in some programming languages it is very important.
def calculate(number):
newnumber = number / 100
return (newnumber)
for counter in range(5,101,5):
answer = calculate(counter)
print(counter,"% = ",answer)
The line return(newnumber) passes the value of the newnumber variable back to the main program.
The line y = caluclate(x) shows that the main program expects a value to be returned and has somewhere to 
store it.
3.3e - Modules
There are some procedures already built in to Python (print, for example). Modules (sometimes known as libraries in 
other languages) are collections of extra procedures and functions that are pre-written.
Try this program first. It won’t work, but I’m trying to prove a point (sqrt is short for square root):
number = 49
answer = sqrt(49)
print(answer)
Now try this one:
import math
number = 49
answer = math.sqrt(49)
print(answer)
You can find a list of modules at http://docs.python.org/py3k/modindex.html
AN INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON!
!
OCR GCSE COMPUTING
PAGE 20 OF 41!
!
MARK CLARKSON, 2012
Copy from locked pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change pdf document security properties; change pdf security settings reader
Copy from locked pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
convert secure pdf to word; change security on pdf
4.1 Turtle
4.1a - Creating a Turtle
If you’ve ever used Logo, Roamer or BeeBots then you’ll be familiar with the concept of a Turtle program. If you’re not, 
then try this code:
import turtle 
#import the turtle module
window = turtle.Screen() 
#create a window
timmy = turtle.Turtle()  
#create a turtle called timmy
timmy.forward(150)
timmy.right(90)
timmy.forward(100)
window.exitonclick() 
#close the window when clicked <-- VERY important
The commands forward, right and left are pretty straightforward.
Keeping the first 5 lines the same, and keeping the last line last, add some more code to draw a square.
4.1b - Creating shapes
You probably came used several forward and right commands to make the square, but there is an easier way:
import turtle 
#import the methods to do with turtle programs
window = turtle.Screen() 
#create a window
timmy = turtle.Turtle()  
#create a turtle called timmy
for loopCounter in range(4):  #repeat the next bit 4 times
timmy.forward(150)
timmy.right(90)
window.exitonclick()
Remember that we use a FOR loop if we know how many times we want to repeat something. Check it works!
A square has 4 sides, of length 150, and with 900 turns. A hexagon has 6 sides, of length 150, and with 600 turns. Try to 
draw a hexagon.
4.1c - Creating shapes challenge
A circle has 3600. For each shape the turtle has to do one full circuit (i.e. turn 3600). 
A square has 4 turns, and 3600 ÷ 4 = 900.
A hexagon has 6 turns, and 3600 ÷ 4 = 600.
A triangle has 3 turns, and 3600÷ 3 = ???
Try drawing a triangle. And a pentagon (5 sides). And an octagon (8 sides). And a decagon (10 sides).
AN INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON!
!
OCR GCSE COMPUTING
PAGE 21 OF 41!
!
MARK CLARKSON, 2012
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing by others makes PDF file become
decrypt pdf; decrypt a pdf file online
C# PowerPoint - Extract or Copy PowerPoint Pages from PowerPoint
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Extract/Copy PowerPoint Pages of PowerPoint Document in C# Project. Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or
add security to pdf document; pdf security password
4.1d - Procedures
It would be really helpful if, instead of writing:
for loopCounter in range(4):  #repeat the next bit 4 times
timmy.forward(150)
timmy.right(90)
We could simply say:
drawASquare()
Try this program:
import turtle
def drawASquare(whichTurtle):
for loopCounter in range(4):
whichTurtle.forward(150)
whichTurtle.right(90)
window = turtle.Screen()
timmy = turtle.Turtle()
drawASquare(timmy)
window.exitonclick()
It just draws a square, right? OK, now in the main program replace :
drawASquare(timmy)
with :
for loopCounter in range(72):  
#repeat 72 times
drawASquare(timmy)
timmy.left(5) 
#turn 50. Note that 3600 ÷ 5 = 720
If that took a bit too long, try inserting this line straight after you have created Timmy :
timmy.speed(0)
AN INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON!
!
OCR GCSE COMPUTING
PAGE 22 OF 41!
!
MARK CLARKSON, 2012
C# Word - Extract or Copy Pages from Word File in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB Extract/Copy Pages of Word Document in C# Project. Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing by
change security settings pdf reader; create secure pdf
C# Excel - Extract or Copy Excel Pages to Excel File in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Extract/Copy Excel Pages of Excel Document in C# Project. Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing
creating secure pdf files; pdf password encryption
4.1e - Spirograph
There used to be a toy called a Spirograph that let you draw lots of coloured patterns like this.
To make the pictures more interesting, we can try changing the colour:
timmy.color(‘blue’)
On its own, that might not look too amazing, but try this:
colourCounter = 1
for loopCounter in range(72):
drawASquare(timmy)
timmy.left(5)
if colourCounter == 1:
timmy.color(‘blue’)
elif colourCounter == 2:
timmy.color(‘red’)
elif colourCounter == 3:
timmy.color(‘yellow’)
elif colourCounter == 4:
timmy.color(‘green’)
colourCounter = 0
colourCounter += 1
Try using pentagons instead of squares, or triangles, or octagons . Try turning amounts other than 5
0
.
4.1f - Lots of turtles
It is very easy to create lots of turtles.
Make sure you have procedures for a square and a hexagon first, then try this:
window = turtle.Screen()
timmy = turtle.Turtle()
tina = turtle.Turtle()
timmy.color(‘blue’)
tina.color(‘pink’)
drawASquare(timmy)
drawAHexagon(tina)
window.exitonclick()
See what other patterns you can come up with using 2, 3 or even more turtles.
AN INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON!
!
OCR GCSE COMPUTING
PAGE 23 OF 41!
!
MARK CLARKSON, 2012
VB.NET Word: Extract Text from Microsoft Word Document in VB.NET
and effort compared with traditional copy and paste Word documents are often locked as static images powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert locked pdf to word online; decrypt password protected pdf
5.1 Regular Expressions
5.1a - Regular Expressions as an input mask
Regular expressions are a really easy way to perform validation checks on data. If you’ve used a 
database before, they’re very similar to input masks.
First of all we need to import the regular expressions module:
import re
The function re.search works like this :
re.match(rule, stringToCheck)
For a simple example, our user has to enter the correct password (‘p@ssword’):
import re
userInput = input(“Enter your password: “)
if re.search(”p@ssword”, userInput):
print(“Correct password entered”)
else:
print(“Error, incorrect password”)
Rules can be a bit more detailed. If we need a postcode that looks like TS16 0LA we can say:
import re
#postcodeRule is “letter, letter, number, number, space, number, letter, letter”
postcodeRule = “[A-Z][A-Z][0-9][0-9] [0-9][A-Z][A-Z]”
userInput = input(“Enter a postcode: “)
if re.search(postcodeRule,userInput):
print(“Valid postcode!”)
else:
print(“Invalid postcode!”)
The [A-Z] check looks for an upper case letter. The [0-9] check looks for a number. The space in the middle IS 
recognised, and if you don’t leave a space in the postcode you type in, the check will fail.
AN INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON!
!
OCR GCSE COMPUTING
PAGE 24 OF 41!
!
MARK CLARKSON, 2012
There are several codes you can use to create your rules:
 
- the letter ‘a‘ 
- allow multiple instances
[a-z]    
- a lower case letter 
- only match at the start
[A-Z]    
- an upper case letter 
- only match at the end
[a-zA-Z]  
- an upper or lower case letter
[0-9] OR \d 
- a number
[a-zA-Z0-9] OR \w  
- a number or letter
- any character
\. 
- a full stop
Some examples:
import re
string = “Now for something completely different”
if re.search(“^N”,string):
print(“Test 1 - Success!”) 
#Will pass, it starts with “N”
if re.search(“for”,string):
print(“Test 2 - Success!”) 
#Will pass, the phrase “for” will be found
if re.search(“^for”,string):
print(“Test 3 - Success!”) 
#Will fail, it doesn’t start with “for”
if re.search(“\w$”,string):
print(“Test 4 - Success!”) 
#Will pass, it ends with a number or letter
if re.search(“^.+t$”,string):
print(“Test 5 - Success!”) 
#Will pass, it starts with a number of characters (^.+) and ends with a “t” (t$) 
5.1b - Regular Expression challenge
Create a program that asks the user to type in a URL (website address) and validates it. A valid URL should have 
“some characters, a full stop, some characters, a full stop and some characters”.
AN INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON!
!
OCR GCSE COMPUTING
PAGE 25 OF 41!
!
MARK CLARKSON, 2012
5.2 – Dictionaries
5.2a  - Introduction
Dictionaries are a type of data structure that
are a
little like lists in that they are a sequence of elements. However, 
elements are not accessed using indexes as are lists, but using keys. Each element in a dictionary consists of a key/value 
pair separated by a colon. For example “george”:”blue”. The string “george” is the key and “blue” is the value. Keys can be 
other datatypes, for example numbers.  However, the datatype of all keys in a dictionary must be the same. 
Because elements are retrieved using their keys looking them up is done in just one go. This means it is a very fast 
operation which takes the same time no matter whether the dictionary has 1 or 1 million elements.
5.2b  - An Example
# Note the use of curly brackets at the start and end of the dictionary, and 
colons to separate the key/value pairs. 
logins  = {“john”:”yellow”, “paul”:”red”, “george”:”blue”, “ringo”:”green”} 
print(logins[“george”]) => “blue”
And 
# Change george’s password to purple
logins[“george”] = “purple”
print(logins)
Gives
{“ringo”: “green”, “paul”: “red”, “john”: “yellow”, “george”: “purple”}
Note how the order of the dictionary has changed. It is not possible to stipulate the order in a dictionary, but this does 
not matter as sequential access it not needed because element values are accessed using keys.
5.2c  - Iteration
Dictionaries can be iterated over using a for loop like so:
# Print all the keys
for item in logins:
print(item)
# Print all the values
for item in logins:
print(logins[item])
# Print both
for key, value  in logins.items():
print(“The key is:”, key, “and the value is:”, value)
Prints:
The key is: ringo and the value is: green
The key is: paul and the value is: red
The key is: john and the value is: yellow
The key is: george and the value is: blue
There are many methods and functions associated with dictionaries. Look at the official Python documentation. Also, 
values stored in a dictionary can be virtually any data type. For example, athletes and their list of running times as values. 
Note that samantha has one less time than mary.
training_times = {“mary”:[12, 45.23, 32.21], “samantha”:[ 11.5, 40.1]}
AN INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON!
!
OCR GCSE COMPUTING
PAGE 26 OF 41!
!
MARK CLARKSON, 2012
5.3 File Handling
BE CAREFUL!!
It is possible to do some serious damage here if you’re not careful!
Before we start, an important note about directory structures:
Under Windows the default file location will be in the Python installation directory (typically C:\python3.1). On a school 
network you can use file locations such as “h:/temp” to refer to your home directory - note which slash is used!.
Under Mac OS X the default file location is your home directory and if you store your work in a sub-directory you could 
use something like “pythonFiles/temp”.
To keep the examples simple the file details here are assumed to be in the default directory. But be careful, and ask for 
help if unsure!
5.3a - Do This First
All will become clear, but before we can do anything else we need to create a data file:
f = open("temp","w")
for n in range(1,11):
m = "This is test number " + str(n) + "\n"
f.write(m)
f.close()
f = open("temp","r")
print(f.read())
f.close()
You should have the following printout:
5.3b - Opening Files
To open a file, you have to make it a variable (just as a string or an integer must be a variable). We do this with the 
following command:
f = open("filename","mode")
Where filename is the name of the file and the mode must be one of the following:
read only
write only - NOTE, this destroys any previous version of the file!
r+ 
read AND write
append mode (will write only after the existing data)
Once you have finished with a file you MUST get into the habit of closing it, or problems will occur. To do so simply 
write f.close().
AN INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON!
!
OCR GCSE COMPUTING
PAGE 27 OF 41!
!
MARK CLARKSON, 2012
5.3c - Reading From Files
Once your file is open you can read from it using the functions:
f.read() - read the entire file
f.readline() - read the current line
It is important to remember that Python keeps track of where you are up to. 
Try the following code:
f = open("temp","r")
print(f.readline())
print("That was the first line")
print(f.readline())
print("That was the second line")
print(f.read())
print("That was all the rest")
print(f.readline())
print("I bet that was blank")
f.close()
You can tell Python to go back to the start by using the seek() procedure:
f = open("temp","r")
print(f.readline())
print("That was the first line")
f.seek(0)
print(f.readline())
print("That was the first line again")
f.close()
You can read one character at a time (or 5 characters at a time) by passing a parameter:
f = open("temp","r")
print(“The first letter is:”)
print(f.read(1))
print(“The second letter is:”)
print(f.read(1))
f.close()
5.3d - Reading Challenge
Write a program that will read each character and append it to a string until the first space is found, then print that 
string.
AN INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON!
!
OCR GCSE COMPUTING
PAGE 28 OF 41!
!
MARK CLARKSON, 2012
5.3e - Writing
At some point you will want to write some data to a file. You can only write strings to file, so you will have to convert any 
numbers before you can write them:
x = 3
y = " is the magic number"
f = open("temp","w") #remember that “w” means the old file will be overwritten
x = str(x)
f.write(x + y)
f.close()
f = open("temp","r")
print(f.read())
f.close()
5.3f - Writing Newlines
Don’t forget that you can use the “\n” character to force a new line.
#The first part will write the "1 potato, 2 potato..." rhyme.
f = open("temp","w")
for n in range(1,4):
f.write(str(n)+" potato\n")
f.write("4\n")
for n in range(5,8):
f.write(str(n) +" potato\n")
f.write("More!")
f.close()
#The second part will print it to the screen to check it looks OK.
f = open("temp","r")
print(f.read())
f.close
AN INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON!
!
OCR GCSE COMPUTING
PAGE 29 OF 41!
!
MARK CLARKSON, 2012
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested