how to convert pdf to jpg in c# windows application : Creating a secure pdf document SDK Library API .net wpf azure sharepoint iwp_2013_052-part269

21 
labour and family separation. Programmes providing transfers combined with human asset 
accumulation and requiring minimum school attendance show links to all child protection 
outcomes, except for family separation. Integrated anti-poverty programmes show links to two 
implementation features: the extension of the school day and school attendance. Through these 
implementation features, integrated anti-poverty programmes show links to all child protection 
outcomes, except family separation. Pure income transfers show links with all child protection 
outcomes, except for child labour.  
Table 3 lists the number of impact evaluation studies covering child protection outcomes. As noted 
above, the discussion which follows will not cover health and schooling outcomes as they have 
been examined extensively in the literature.  
Table 3. Number of impact evaluation studies including child protection outcomes by programme 
type 
Programme type and  
key features 
Family 
Separation 
Child 
labour 
Child 
marriage 
Birth 
registration 
Schooling 
Health 
Total 
reports 
Human capital accumulation 
31 
48 
10 
62 
Adult labour 
Extracurricular activities 
Minimum school attendance 
26 
46 
10 
56 
Integrated anti-poverty 
Extracurricular activities 
Minimum school attendance 
Pure income transfers 
13 
No conditions 
13 
Total outcomes 
36 
58 
19 
79 
The following two sections provide a more detailed discussion of the direct effects of social 
transfers on child protection emerging from impact evaluation studies.  
Programme types and child protection 
Different types of transfer programmes can shape welfare outcomes differently, with implications 
for child protection. Box 2 described the main types of social transfer programmes. Pure income 
transfers are mainly focused on categories of the population perceived to be at risk of poverty, 
such as older people, people with disabilities, and children. Transfers are generally aimed at 
improving household consumption and at overcoming income barriers to accessing services. Pure 
income transfers could yield positive outcomes for children, even if they are not the focus of the 
intervention.
37
Regardless of the immediate recipient, in low- and middle-income countries anti-
poverty transfers are shared within households.
38
At the same time, the potential effects of direct 
income transfers on child protection could be limited by their design.
39
37
BARRIENTOS, A. and DEJONG, J. 2006. Reducing child poverty with cash transfers: A sure thing? Development Policy Review, 24, 537-552. 
38
Research on receipt of social pensions, for example, shows that transfers are shared by pensioners with their households, in a majority 
of cases as a contribution to household income. The implication is that social transfers are, in the main, allocated in line with household 
priorities. Studies on intra-household resource allocation in developing countries point to considerable heterogeneity in decision making. 
They also find important gender and age differences in power and influence. In developing countries, many social transfer programmes 
make mothers the direct beneficiaries of transfers in the expectation that they will influence intra-household resource allocation towards 
Creating a secure pdf document - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
creating a secure pdf document; pdf password unlock
Creating a secure pdf document - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
create secure pdf online; add security to pdf
22 
Looking at Fig. 2, income transfers focused on human development, like conditional cash transfer 
programmes, often require households to ensure children attend school and household members 
attend health check-ups. They are strongly child-focused, while requiring parents to spend time 
and money on the verification of these conditions. The explicit objective of these programmes is to 
ensure children have higher human capital and productivity than their parents, as a means of 
reducing the generational persistence of poverty.
40
Nonetheless, schooling and heath conditions, if 
applied strictly, may fail to reach children in poverty in areas without service infrastructure, and 
could fail to reach children in extreme vulnerability where parents are unable to comply with 
programme conditions. Eligibility conditions based on specific thresholds of child malnutrition 
could be problematic from a child protection context. Some programmes target households with 
higher incidence of child malnourishment, where children are monitored periodically to determine 
whether the household can remain as a beneficiary. This can generate perverse incentive to 
restrict the amount of food provided to children, in order to remain eligible for support (Dunn, 
2009).
41
Social transfer programmes may facilitate parental care. A qualitative evaluation of Mexico's 
Progresa/Oportunidades programme notes that some mothers are able to exercise a preference to 
reduce market work in order to spend more time with their children, particularly infants.
42
This is 
also shaped by their perceptions about the insecurity of the neighbourhoods and the risks 
associated with leaving children alone during the daytime. This is corroborated by findings from an 
impact evaluation of Colombia's Familias en Acción, where some mothers reduced their labour 
supply, while their partners raised the hours they worked.
43
Finally, integrated anti-poverty programmes combine cash transfers with personal intermediation 
and follow-up. These programmes aim to address deficits along several dimensions of well-being 
and pay explicit attention to social exclusion. In  hile͛s Chile Solidario, child protection-related 
outcomes are explicitly incorporated into the selected dimensions of deprivation. They include 
antenatal monitoring and training, birth registration, disability support and rehabilitation, 
fostering, intra-household dynamics and conflict, drug addiction, and others.
44
This type of transfer 
programme matches households with a range of support from multiple public programmes, and 
helps to coordinate the work of the many agencies involved. Chile Solidario targeted the 
achievement of 53 minimum thresholds in seven dimensions of well-being as the condition for 
households to exit the programme, and as a means to measure progress. Some of the minimum 
thresholds relating to child protection indicators include birth registration, school attendance, 
literacy of adolescents, schooling for children with disabilities, parental concern about the 
children. See Haddad, L., Hoddinott, J. and Alderman, H. (eds.) (1997). Intrahousehold Resource Allocation in Developing Countries, 
London:  John  Hopkins  University  Press;  Molyneux,  M.  (2006).  Mothers  at  the  Service  of  the  New  Poverty  Agenda: 
Progresa/Oportunidades, Mexico's conditional transfer programme, Social Policy and Administration, 40: 425-449.   
39
An old age bias in pure income transfers might be partly due to the fact that older people have voting rights but children do not have 
them. Hickey, S. (2007). Conceptualising the Politics of Social Protection in Africa. SSRN eLibrary. 
40
The objective of these programmes is to improve school enrolment and attendance, but they lack explicit objectives around the quality 
of the education children receive. See Reimers, F., Deshano Da Silva, C. and Trevino, E. (2006). Where is the "Education" in Conditional 
Cash Transfers in Education? Montreal: UNESCO Institute for Statistics. 
41
Dunn, S. (2009). External Evaluation: Fresh food voucher project by Action Against hunger Dadaab refugee camps, Kenya. Action Against 
Hunger. 
42
Escobar Latapí, A. and González De La Rocha, M. (2009). Evaluacion Qualitativa del Programa Oportunidades. Etapa urbana 2003. CIESAS 
- Occidente. 
43
Nuñez, J. (2011). Evaluación del Programa Familias en Acción en Grandes Centros Urbanos. Centro Nacional de Consultoría. 
44
Barrientos, A. (2010). Protecting Capabilities, Eradicating Extreme Poverty: Chile Solidario and the future of social protection. Journal of 
Human Development and Capabilities, 11: 579-597. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
C#.NET PDF document file creating library control, RasterEdge XDoc for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry-standard PDF document file.
creating secure pdf files; decrypt a pdf file online
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
C#.NET Word document file creating library control, RasterEdge XDoc for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry-standard Word document file
pdf security password; decrypt pdf password
23 
education of their children, housing and public services, adequate home conflict resolution, and 
domestic violence. 
In sum, the design features of social transfers can have important implications for child protection 
risk factors and outcomes. Social transfer designs can facilitate or limit synergies with child 
protection and, in rare cases, programme design features could exacerbate child protection risk 
factors.  
Social transfers and child protection outcomes and risk factors 
Information on direct effects of social transfers on child protection outcomes captured in the 
database can also be arranged by specific child protection outcomes and risk factors. The 
discussion below summarizes the main findings.  
Birth registration 
Some registration is a requirement for participation in the vast majority of social transfer 
programmes.
45
Social transfer programmes lead directly to comprehensive registration among 
potential beneficiaries. In India͛s National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme, applications for 
participation require birth certificates as proof of age. The programme has also contributed to the 
Unique Identification Project in India, which seeks to provide identity cards to all Indian citizens.  
Birth registration is usually required for participation in child-focused programmes. Parents are 
encouraged to register their children and government agencies are required to facilitate 
registration procedures. In conditions where birth registration is a complex and expensive process, 
this requirement might be difficult for households to meet. It is important that programme 
designers pay attention to this issue and not to penalise the families who are unable to register 
their children at birth.  In  olombia͛s Familias en Acción, for example, local officers of the national 
registration agency are present in the enrolment of new beneficiaries by the programme agency in 
order to speed up and facilitate participant households meeting this requirement. Parents or 
caregivers can obtain the required certificates for enrolment into the programme without spending 
additional resources on travelling to different places. The programme also overcomes the lack of 
birth registration in conflict situations, by allowing displaced families to obtain preferential access 
to identification services.
46
Social transfer programmes providing for follow up and check-ups of 
expectant mothers commonly ensure birth registration of newly born babies. An evaluation of 
olombia͛s Familias en Acción found that 97.3 per cent of participant children had birth 
certificates, compared to 91.7 per cent of non-participants.
47
45
This has been so since the 17th century. Szreter, S. (2007). The Right to Registration: Development, identity registration and social 
security - a historical perspective. World Development, 35: 67-86. 
46
Accion Social (2010). El Camino Recorrido: Diez Años Familias en Acción, Bogotá. 
47
Centro Nacional De Consultoría (2008). Evaluación del Programa Familias en Acción para Población Desplazada. Serie de Evaluaciones 
Externas. Centro Nacional de Consultoría. 
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
C#.NET PowerPoint document file creating library control, RasterEdge developers to create a highly-secure and industry-standard PowerPoint document file
pdf secure; secure pdf
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry a Word document in C#.NET using this Word document creating toolkit, if Create Word From PDF.
pdf password encryption; change pdf security settings reader
24 
Family separation 
Social transfers impact on family separation in several ways, but especially through their effects on 
mitigating the impact of migration and conflict on children.  
Social transfers can prevent family separation by allowing parents to avoid involuntarily migrating 
from rural to large urban areas as job seekers. In such situations, parents may leave children in the 
care of other family members (grandparents, relatives) or in other informal fostering 
arrangements. Though kinship care bears certain advantages for children (continued family 
contact, maintaining identity, reduced distress from relocation), it may also lead to child neglect 
and deprivation, loss of inheritance and other problems. Where children are more closely related 
to their kin, e.g. grandparents, the quality of care is better.
48
Social pension programmes in Brazil 
and South Africa were purposely designed to support older people in communities affected by 
large-scale migration.
49
They had the additional aim of strengthening the local economy in areas 
48 Roby, J. (2011). Children in Informal Alternative Care. Child Protection Section. New York: UNICEF. 
49 Barrientos, A. (2008). Cash Transfers for Older People Reduce Poverty and Inequality. In: Bebbington, A. J., Dani, A. A., De Haan, A. and 
Walton, M. (eds.) Institutional Pathways to Equity. Addressing Inequality Traps. Washington DC: The World Bank. 
Box 4. Kenya’s Orphans and Vulnerable Children Programme 
The Orphans and Vulnerable Children Programme began to be implemented as a pilot in 
2004 and then ran its second phase from 2005 to 2009; a third phase, beginning in 2010, 
was expected to scale up the programme to cover 110,000 households by 2012. In terms 
of its design this programme is modelled on the conditional transfer programmes in Latin 
America, but capacity constraints in Kenya have restricted the implementation of 
conditions. It targets households in extreme poverty with orphans or vulnerable children, 
and provides a transfer of around US$26 per month. The main objectives of the 
programme include: keeping orphaned and vulnerable children within families and 
facilitating investment in health and schooling; reducing mortality and morbidity among 
children under five years of age; school enrolment and attendance by children aged six 
to 17; and ensuring birth registration. The impact evaluation of the second phase 
showed that the programme has increased ownership of birth registration certificates by 
12 per cent in comparison to the control group.  
At the same time, the programme did not appear to produce significant changes in 
reduction of family separation across treatment and control groups. Orphaned and 
vulnerable children
were almost entirely retained within the extended family in both 
programme and control areas, which were close to universal before the programme 
even began. This was largely due to the fact that informal fostering, kinship and 
community care of orphaned children are embedded in existing social norms. However, 
the Programme contributed to raising the living standards of families, allowing them to 
provide better care to orphaned children in their households.* 
* See: Garcia, M. and Moore, C. M. T. (2012). The Cash Dividend. The Rise of Cash Transfer Programs in Sub-Saharan Africa, 
Washington DC: The World Bank. Ward, P. et al for UNICEF. Cash Transfer Programme for Orphans and Vulnerable 
Children (CT-OVC), Kenya, Operational and Impact Evaluation 2007-2009. 
C# Excel - Excel Creating in C#.NET
C#.NET Excel document file creating library control, RasterEdge XDoc C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry-standard Excel document file.
change pdf document security; can print pdf security
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
By creating, loading, and modifying annotations, you can for text selecting in order to secure your web & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
pdf password security; add security to pdf document
25 
depressed by the migration of working-age adults.
50
This applies to other social transfers too. A 
study of South Africa͛s Child Support Grant found that receipt of the grant was associated with an 
eight per cent higher probability that children lived with their biological parents.
51
Colombia͛s 
Familias in Accion was originally focused on facilitating family reunion and preventing family 
separation due to social conflict. 
Social transfers are an effective response to family separation forced by migration due to war or 
internal conflict (See Box 5). Social transfers have been used as an incentive encouraging families 
to return to the places they were forced to leave, as in Familias in Accion in Colombia.
52
Transfers 
allow parents to spend more time with their children and strengthen their intra-household 
relations. A displaced beneficiary from Colombia's Familias en Accion CCT programme declares 
that: 
"...if you don't work, you don't eat. But in those days that you receive the money you can reserve 
that day because you have something for giving them to eat, then you can spend that day to the 
children"
53
Social transfers could also encourage migration. The additional income, combined with its 
regularity and reliability, facilitate a reallocation of household productive resources. Social 
transfers provide domestic migration opportunities for parents who are willing to work in larger 
urban centres, leaving their children in rural areas until they are eventually able to bring them into 
the city.
54
Research on the labour supply effects of social pension receipt in South Africa finds that 
migration of working age mothers can be facilitated by the regular income received by female 
pensioners, who could also provide care.
55
In conditional cash transfer programmes implemented 
in rural areas, compliance with the condition that children attend secondary school may require 
recipients to migrate to urban centres where secondary schools are located. The fact that social 
transfers help children accumulate more human capital increases the likelihood that young people 
will leave their homes in search of better employment opportunities, as has been observed in 
studies of the trajectories of 14-17 year olds participating in Mexico͛s Progresa/Oportunidades.
56
50
Barrientos, A. (2012). Social Transfers and Growth. What do we know? What do we need to find out? World Development, 40: 11-20. 
51
Mayrand, H. (2010). Does Money Matter?: the effects of the child support grant on childrearing decisions in South Africa, Université 
Laval. 
52
centro Nacional de Consultoría (2008). Evaluación del Programa Familias en Acción para Población Desplazada. Serie de Evaluaciones 
Externas. Centro Nacional de Consultoría. 
53
Ibid. p. 529. 
54
Stecklov, G., Winters, P., Tood, J. and Regalia, F. (2007). Unintended Effects of Poverty Programmes on Childbearing in Less Developed 
Countries: Experimental evidence from Latin America, Population Studies, 61: 125-140. 
55
Ardington, C., Case, A. and Hosegood, V. (2009). Labour Supply Responses to Large Social Transfers: Longitudinal evidence from South 
Africa, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 1: 22-48. 
56
Oliver,  A.  (2009).  Does  Poverty  Alleviation  Increase  Migration?  Evidence  from  Mexico.  Available  at:  http://mpra.ub.uni-
muenchen.de/17599/files/356/17599.html. 
VB.NET Word: VB Tutorial to Convert Word to Other Formats in .NET
But if you want to share the Word information with others across platforms, then converting Word to a more secure document format PDF will be greatly favored.
convert locked pdf to word doc; cannot print pdf security
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
software; Open standard for more secure, dependable electronic version among a suite of PDF-based standards to develop specifications for creating, viewing, and
copy text from encrypted pdf; advanced pdf encryption remover
26 
Child labour 
According to UNICEF, a child is considered to be involved in child labour if the following 
circumstances apply: (a) children 5 to 11 years of age are engaged in one hour of economic activity 
or a minimum of 28 hours of domestic work in the week preceding the survey, and (b) children 12 
to 14 years of age are engaged in at least 14 hours of economic activity or a minimum of 42 hours 
of economic activity and domestic work combined per week.
57
However, most of the impact 
evaluations reviewed define child labour according to the ILO standards, as the engagement of 
children in remunerated or non-remunerated work at least for one hour in the week prior to the 
survey; or the engagement of children in job search. This broader definition allows the inclusion of 
results from some studies which might not be considered child labour in UNICEF's approach. It is 
noteworthy that the studies reviewed fail to use a common consistent definition, in part because 
evaluation surveys follow established practices in their national household surveys.
58
There is strong evidence from impact evaluations on how the design features of social transfers 
affect child labour.
59
The main findings from this literature are that social transfers often lead to a 
reallocation of household labour resources, in response to the specific objectives of programmes. 
Broadly, child labour declines if social transfers specifically target child labour or child schooling, 
which effectively limits children͛s capacity to work outside the home. The effects are stronger 
57
http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/stats_popup9.html 
58
For example, in the evaluation of Mexico's Progresa/Oportunidades the survey questionnaire (available at www.coneval.gob.mx) 
included an employment module for respondents from 5 years of age and older. The relevant question is: "In the last week, did you work 
for at least one hour?" The incidence of child labour was obtained from responses to this question. 
59
An up to date assessment can be found in de Hoop, J. and Rosati, F. 2012. What Have We Learned from a Decade of Child Labour Impact 
Evaluations? Understanding Children’s Work Programme Working Paper Series. Understanding Children's Work. 
Box 5. Familias en Acción Programme for the Displaced Population in Colombia 
The Familias en Acción Programme for the Displaced Population is a monetary transfer 
conditional on school attendance and health checkups for displaced families registered 
in the displaced population information system. The programme is an extension of the 
general Familias en Accion programme, and follows the same scheme, with the same 
amount of transfers, and the same conditions, but it differs in the registration process. In 
Familias en Acción the beneficiaries must be registered and classified by a proxy means 
test, while in Familias en Acción for the Displaced Population, beneficiaries must be 
registered as victims of displacement with no consideration of their income level. The 
programme offers two subsidies, a nutritional subsidy of US$20 per month for families 
with children under seven years of age, a school subsidy of US$6 per month for children 
in primary school and US$12 dollars for children in secondary school. An impact 
evaluation found that the programme had improved birth registration and prevalence of 
identity cards for minors. Using propensity score matching methods, they found birth 
registration among participants was between three and 3.3 percentage points higher for 
children aged 0-6 years, and possession of identity cards between 5.6 and 6.5 percentage 
points higher for children aged 7-17 years, compared to non-participants.* 
*
Centro Nacional de Consultoría (2008). Evaluación del Programa Familias en Acción para Población Desplazada. Serie de 
Evaluaciones Externas. Centro Nacional de Consultoría. 
VB.NET Word: How to Convert Word Document to PNG Image Format in
document formats, including converting Word to PDF in VB password can't be removed from the Word document. is equipped with a more secure document protection by
change pdf security settings; decrypt pdf online
27 
where extracurricular activities are included. The reduction in child labour hours is often less than 
proportionate to the rise in hours spent at school. Social transfer programmes providing for extra-
curricular activities are relatively more effective in reducing child labour. 
The impacts of social transfers on child labour are heterogeneous, and show strong gender 
differences. Boys are more likely to be affected by a reduction of child labour than girls. For 
example, Behrman et al. (2011) find that boys from Mexico's Progresa/Oportunidades programme 
were reassigned from work to school activities by their parents, while the effects on the girls was 
negligible.
60
One of the explanations is that boys have higher rates of labour force participation 
than those observed for girls. As for the girls, some evidence was found of a reduction in the time 
they spent on household chores, for example in Malawi's Social Cash Transfer.
61
A report by the ILO (2007) discusses how the CCTs in Latin America impact on the employment 
status of children, and on the impact of variations in the specification of the programme design 
and benefit amounts.
62
The report highlights the implementation of the Child Labour Eradication 
Programme (Programa de Erradicaçao do Trabalho Infantil, PETI) in Brazil (See Box 6). It was 
introduced in 1996 in the north-east of the country, in areas with a large incidence of children 
working in coal mines and in agriculture. It was very effective in reducing child labour, through a 
combination of income transfers, school attendance conditions and an extended school day 
providing remedial and supplementary education. An evaluation of PETI found a fifty per cent 
reduction of hours worked by children.
63
A study finds that conditions reduce the impact of shocks 
on child schooling and labour because they restrict households͛ option to rely on child labour as a 
buffer against shocks.
64
Social transfers reduce child labour through the additional income to households and through 
making the transfer conditional on school attendance. The amount of the transfer is often higher 
than the earned income of children, enabling parents to substitute child labour with school 
enrolment (See Box 7).
65
Integrated anti-poverty programmes are also able to monitor the 
children͛s labour status, and align interventions designed to address it.
66
However, if transfer 
programmes manage to secure higher levels of school attendance, the associated reduction in 
child labour might be less than proportionate to the rise in schooling at the expense of children͛s 
free time. This is the finding from a study of the impact of  angladesh͛s cash for education 
programme.
67
In view of these findings, the designers of Costa Rica's Avancemos opted to require 
parents to demonstrate that their children are not engaged in labour activities. 
60
Behrman, J. R., Gallardo-Garcia, J., Parker, S. W., Todd, P. E. and Velez-Grajales, V. 2011. Are Conditional Cash Transfers Effective in 
Urban Areas? Evidence from Mexico. Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania. 
61
Covarrubias, K., Davis, B. and Winters, P. (2012). From Protection to Production: Productive impacts of the Malawi Social Cash Transfer 
scheme, Journal of Development Effectiveness, 4: 50-77. 
62
ILO (2007). Child Labour: Cause and Effect of the Perpetuation of Poverty. Geneva: International Program for the Eradication of Child 
Labour-IPEC. 
63
Yap, Y.-T., Sedlacek, G. and Orazem, P. F. (2002). Limiting Child Labor through Behavior-based Income Transfers: An experimental 
evaluation of the PETI program in rural Brazil, Washington DC: Inter-American Development Bank. 
64
De Janvry, A., Finan, F., Sadoulet, E. and Vakis, R. (2006). Can Conditional Transfer Programmes Work as Safety Nets in Keeping Children 
at School and from Working when exposed to shocks? Journal of Development Economics, 79, 349-373. 
65
Rawlings, L. B. and Rubio, L. (2005). Evaluating the Impact of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs, World Bank Research Observer, 20: 29-
55. 
66
Galasso, E. (2011). Alleviating Extreme Poverty in Chile: The short term effects of Chile Solidario, Estudios de Economia, 38: 101-127. 
67
Ravallion, M. and Wodon, Q. (2000). Does Child Labour Displace Schooling? Evidence on behavioural responses to enrollment subsidy. 
Economic Journal, 110: C158-C175. 
28 
A reduction of child labour required by social transfer programmes often has implications for the 
labour supply of adults. A reduction in the labour supply of children can be compensated for by a 
rise in the labour supply of adults. Similarly, a reduction in the labour supply of mothers can be 
compensated for by a rise in the labour supply of other adults in the household. The issue is 
whether these changes in labour supply among adults have implications for the care of children. In 
the context of social transfer programmes requiring the labour supply of adults as a counterpart, as 
in Ethiopia͛s Productive Safety Net Programme or India͛s National Rural Employment Guarantee, 
the issue has received some attention. There are adverse impacts on parental care arising from the 
adult work requirement, but these can be minimised through the provision of adequate child care 
at the work location.
68
The conditions attached to participation are emphasised to participant 
households at induction, through a contract describing their rights and responsibilities. Capacity 
constraints meant that conditions have not been enforced until recently. Monthly meetings with 
participant households focus on health and nutrition information. A study of Ethiopia͛s Productive 
Safety Net Programme found that the number of daily hours parents spent on child care and 
household chores decreased between 0.15-0.19 on average, while child school attendance and 
study at home decreased by 0.02-0.04 hours on average, a small but statistically significant effect.
69
68
KHERA, R. (ed.) 2011. The Battle for Employment Guarantee, Delhi: Oxford University Press. 
69
TAFERE, Y. and WOLDEHANNA, T. 2012. Beyond Food Security: Transforming the Productive Safety Net Programme in Ethiopia for the 
Well-being of Children. Working Paper. Young Lives. 
Box 6. Programa de Errradicaçao do Trabalho Infantil (PETI) in Brazil  
The Programa de Erradicaçao do Trabalho Infantil (PETI) was introduced in 1996 as a 
cash transfer aimed at reducing hazardous child labour, and integrated into Bolsa Familia 
in 2003. The programme includes attendance of after-school activities, known as the 
Jornada Ampliada. The benefit was conditional on school attendance for at least 80 per 
cent of the time. A study*concluded that the Jornada Ampliada reduced children͛s 
worked hours by around 50 per cent. The programme was more successful in reducing 
hazardous child labour among children working part-time than among full-time child 
workers. The programme also reduced the probability of children being involved in 
hazardous or risky work. 
*
Yap, Y.-T., Sedlacek, G. and Orazem, P. F. (2002). Limiting Child Labor through Behavior-based Income Transfers: An 
experimental evaluation of the PETI program in rural Brazil, Washington DC: Inter-American Development Bank.  
29 
Box 7. Reduction in child labour and the level of the transfer 
How important is the level of the transfer for the impact of social transfers on child 
labour outcomes? Figure 3 below plots reductions in child labour and the value of the 
transfer as percentage of total household income reported in several impact evaluation 
studies.* 
Figure 3. The level of social transfers and the effects on child labour rates 
Note: Data from Barrientos et al (2010) and de Hoop and Furio (2012). The measured effects come from evaluation studies 
using different techniques for identifying impact and slightly different definitions of child labour, but all of them consider 
children between 10-17 years of age. The horizontal axis refers to the reported total nominal income of programme 
participant households. 
The Figure shows variation in the observed effects of social transfers on the rate of 
child labour (percentage points). Starting from a cluster of programmes in the bottom 
left-hand side, they transfer a lower amount and generate a small reduction in the 
proportion of children in work. Then another group of programmes on the right-hand 
side provide higher-level transfers. Some of these programmes generate greater 
reductions in the rate of child labour, as in Ecuador͛s Bono de Desarrollo Humano. The 
level of the transfer has a strong influence on child labour outcomes, but other factors, 
such as co-responsibilities and the initial rates of children͛s labour force participation, 
appear to be important too.  
*Barrientos, A., Niño-Zarazúa, M. and Maitrot, M. (2010). Social Assistance in Developing Countries Database Version 5. 
Manchester: Brooks World Poverty Institute; De Hoop, J. and Rosati, F. (2012). What Have We Learned from a Decade of 
Child Labour  Impact Evaluations? Understanding  Children’s  Work  Programme  Working  Paper Series. Understanding 
Children's Work.
Bono 
desarrollo 
humano 
(Ecuador) 
CSG (S. Africa) 
RPS 
(Nicaragua) 
PRAF(Honduras) 
Familias Accion 
(Colombia) 
Oportunidades 
(Mexico) 
PATH (Jamaica) 
SCT (Malawi) 
Tekopora 
(Paraguay) 
30 
Child marriage 
Social transfer programmes impact on child marriage, mainly through the combination of school 
attendance graded transfers and school attendance conditions. Several evaluation studies provide 
information on this.
70
In some social transfer programmes, designers have paid attention to 
enrolment rates and dropout rates for different school grades. The transition from primary to 
secondary school is often associated with a spike in dropout rates, especially for girls. To address 
this issue, some social transfer programmes provide transfer levels graded to retain children at 
school. Mexico͛s Progresa/Oportunidades provides higher level of transfers for secondary school 
students, rising with school grade, and also at different level for boys and girls. This is intended to 
provide financial incentives to households to keep children, and especially girls, at school. In fact, 
the evaluations of Progresa/Oportunidades, and other human capital accumulation programmes 
with similar transfer level incentives, show reduced drop-out rates and higher retention effects for 
girls than for boys.  
This can have implications for child marriage. A study of  angladesh͛s Female Secondary School 
Stipend concluded that the transfer programme had been effective in closing the gender schooling 
gap between boys and girls and reducing the incidence of child marriage and child bearing. The 
stipend was conditional on girls remaining unmarried.
71
The Zomba pilot programme in Malawi 
tested the impact of an unconditional cash transfer linked to girls͛ sexual behaviour and found a 
reduction of 48 per cent in child marriage and 38 per cent in early pregnancy.
72
A recent study reports on the use of social transfers to delay the sexual initiation of girls in sub-
Saharan Africa. An experimental transfer scheme in Uganda demonstrated that the provision of 
transfers through saving accounts, workshops and mentorship led to a reduction in sexual risk-
taking among participant children.
73
Indirect effects 
This section examines indirect effects of social transfers on child protection outcomes. These 
effects are referred to as indirect in order to acknowledge the role of poverty reduction as a 
mediating factor linking social transfers and child protection outcomes.  
Social transfers and poverty reduction 
As discussed earlier in the paper the main objective of social transfers is the reduction of poverty 
and exclusion. Their effectiveness is largely measured in terms of the impact of social transfers on 
poverty measures.  
70
Attanasio, O., Fitzsimons, E., Gomez, A., GutiĠrrez, M. I., Meghir,  . and Mesnard, A. (2010).  hildren͛s Schooling and Work in the 
Presence of a Conditional Cash Transfer Program in Rural Colombia, Economic Development and Cultural Change, 58: 181-210; Borkum, E. 
(2012). Can Eliminating School Fees in Poor Districts Boost Enrollment? Evidence from South Africa, Department of Economics Discussion 
Papers, Colombia University, 60: 359-398; De Janvry, A., Finan, F., Sadoulet, E. and Vakis, R. (2006). Can Conditional Transfer Programmes 
Work as Safety Nets in Keeping Children at School and from Working When Exposed to Shocks? Journal of Development Economics, 79: 
349-373; Khandker, S., Pitt, M. and Fuwa, N. (2003). Subsidy to Promote Girls' Secondary Education: The Female Stipend Program in 
Bangladesh. Available at: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/23688/files/325/23688.html. 
71
Khandker, S., Pitt, M. and Fuwa, N. (2003). Subsidy to Promote Girls' Secondary Education: The Female Stipend Program in Bangladesh. 
Available at: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/23688/files/325/23688.html. 
72
Baird, S., Mcintosh, C. and Özler, B. (2011). Cash or Condition? Evidence from a cash experiment. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 126: 
1709-1753. 
73
Ssewamala, F. M., Han, C.-K., Neilands, T. B., Ismayilova, L. and Sperber, E. 2010. Effect of Economic Assets on Sexual Risk-taking 
Intentions among Orphaned Adolescents in Uganda, American Journal of Public Health, 100: 483-488. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested