pdf to jpg c# open source : Change security settings pdf reader application control tool html azure web page online LIRS_RoundtableReport_WEB0-part586

1
Shawn Talbot / Shutterstock.com
At the Crossroads 
for Unaccompanied 
Migrant Children
POLICY, PRACTICE, & PROTECTION
Change security settings pdf reader - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt pdf file; pdf password security
Change security settings pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt a pdf; change pdf document security properties
T
his “Unified Vision for Protecting Unaccompanied Children” sets out a statement of principles developed 
through a series of roundtable discussions hosted by Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service. The principles 
are timely in their application to current compelling events, and also timeless in their enduring applicability 
to the care of unaccompanied children beyond this immediate humanitarian crisis. While current events continue 
to change and evolve, along with the U.S. government’s legislative and programmatic approaches to unaccompanied 
children, the relevance and necessity of these fundamental principles has never been greater, in order to ensure that 
there is no erosion of humanitarian and due process protections for the lives and safety of unaccompanied children.
Principle #1
Unaccompanied children are children first and foremost. U.S. policies and practices must recognize their unique 
vulnerabilities and developmental needs within a context of the best interests of the child.
Principle #2
Screening of children for persecution, abuse, or exploitation should be done by skilled child welfare professionals. 
Principle #3
Children require individualized adjudication procedures that recognize a child’s need for trust, safety and time, in order 
to disclose trauma and maltreatment; in legal proceedings, unaccompanied children need legal counsel to represent 
their wishes, and the equivalent of a guardian ad litem (Child Advocate) to represent their best interests.
Principle #4
Children are best cared for by their families, and family unity supports children’s long-term stability and well-being. 
When children are in transitional situations, they should be cared for by child welfare entities in the most family-like, 
least restrictive setting appropriate to their needs.
Principle #5
Programs with care and custody of unaccompanied children must provide a safe and nurturing environment with 
trained and qualified staff who have child welfare expertise, while also preparing children and their future caregivers 
for a successful transition to a supportive family setting.
Principle #6
Following reunification, every unaccompanied child should receive community-based case management and support 
services to facilitate healthy integration and to prevent child maltreatment.
Principle #7
Children are best served when government agencies and their partners incorporate principles of accountability, 
collaboration, information sharing, documentation of best practices, evaluation, and quality improvement. 
A UNIFIED VISION FOR PROTECTING 
UNACCOMPANIED CHILDREN:
Statement of Principles
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK provides some PDF security settings about password to help protect your PDF document Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password.
convert locked pdf to word doc; pdf security remover
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
create encrypted pdf; change security settings pdf reader
Individual endorsers:
Thomas M. Crea, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Boston College Graduate School of Social Work
Susan Schmidt, MSSW, LGSW
Adjunct Social Work Instructor
College of St. Scholastica (Twin Cities)
Elvis Garcia Callejas
Immigration Counselor Specialist 
Dr. Susan Terrio 
Professor of Anthropology and French Studies
Georgetown University
Jayshree Jani, Ph.D., MSW, LCSW-C
Assistant Professor
Social Work Department
University of Maryland, Baltimore County
We represent a diverse group of service providers: both faith-based and secular, providing legal and social services, 
working nationally, in academia, and in local communities. Many of us have served unaccompanied children for decades, 
giving us a perspective beyond this immediate crisis. Some of us have worked with and provided direct services to 
refugee children in the U.S. and abroad, while others have focused on children in our U.S. child welfare systems. These 
principles developed during three national “Roundtable” meetings remained consistent in their focus on the central 
themes of protection, stability, accountability, and cross-system collaboration. 
We are united by the certainty, and sense of urgency, that the current humanitarian crisis must be viewed through the 
prism of child protection and guided by these enduring principles. 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Document Protection. XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. Password, digital
decrypt pdf online; copy paste encrypted pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
change pdf security settings; advanced pdf encryption remover
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This report has been informed by the wisdom, experience, and passion of an 
extraordinary group of national and local experts, convened by Lutheran Immigration 
and Refugee Service (LIRS) in a series of Roundtable meetings on the topic 
of unaccompanied refugee and migrant children. LIRS thanks the Roundtable 
participants who attended these meetings, who shared their insights and their 
hopes for improving the United States’ current system of care for unaccompanied 
children. A list of Roundtable participants follows in Appendix C.  
In addition, LIRS would like to thank the following staff and consultants for 
their diligent work in envisioning, planning, leading, and documenting the 
Roundtable series on unaccompanied children:
•  Doug Brown, LIRS Children’s Services Coordinator
•  Kristen Guskovict, Consultant and Facilitator
•  Linda Hartke, LIRS President and CEO
•  Kim Haynes, LIRS Director for Children’s Services
•  Jessica Jones, LIRS Children and Youth Policy Associate
•  Fabio Lomelino, LIRS Director for Network Engagement
•  Kristine Poplawski, LIRS Children’s Services Coordinator
•  Angela Randall, LIRS Administrative Assistant for Children’s Services
•  Laura Schmidt, LIRS Children’s Services Coordinator
•  Susan Schmidt, Consultant and Report Writer
•  Aryah Somers, Consultant and Facilitator
•  Dawnya Underwood, LIRS Assistant Director for Children’s Services
•  Annie Wilson, LIRS Chief Strategy Officer
Finally, we would like to acknowledge the thoughtful contributions offered by staff 
and consultants to the production of this report. Susan Schmidt is the lead author. 
Significant input was provided during the drafting stages by Kristen Guscovict, 
Jessica Jones, Joanne Kelsey (LIRS Assistant Director for Advocacy), Chak Ng (LIRS 
Assistant Director for Quality Assurance), Aryah Somers, and Dawnya Underwood. 
Final formatting and production oversight was provided by Clarissa Perkins (LIRS 
Creative Services Project Manager), Nicole Jurmo (LIRS Assistant Director for 
Communications), and Amanda Ghessie (Advocacy Intern).
Please note that the recommendations included in this report should be 
attributed to Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service.  Although LIRS was 
informed by many views and perspectives, the recommendations are solely our 
responsibility and are not endorsed by Roundtable participants.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
decrypt pdf with password; copy text from locked pdf
C# Imaging - Decode Code 93 Barcode in C#.NET
the purpose to provide a higher density and data security enhancement to Load an image or a document(PDF, TIFF, Word, Excel Set the barcode reader settings.
add security to pdf file; add security to pdf in reader
TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
7
PREFACE 
8
INTRODUCTION 
9
LEGAL AND POLICY FRAMEWORK 
10
CURRENT CONTEXT, PRACTICES, AND 
CHALLENGES 
12
A System in Crisis 13
Apprehension and Custody of Unaccompanied 
Children 13
Lack of Protections for Unaccompanied Children from 
Contiguous Countries (i.e. Mexico and Canada) 14
Custody, Transport, and Return of Unaccompanied 
Children 14
Placement of Unaccompanied Children 15
Home Studies Prior to Family Reunification 16
Case Coordination 17
Family Reunification Timeframes 17
Safe Release and Fingerprinting 17
Follow-Up Services 18
Legal Services and Legal Representation 18
Child Advocates 19
Immigration Court Procedures 20
Summary 20
CHILD PROTECTION PRINCIPLES 
21
RECOMMENDATIONS 
24
CONCLUSION 
30
C# Image: C# Code to Upload TIFF File to Remote Database by Using
Website project and select WSE Settings 3.0. using System.Security.Cryptography; private void tsbUpload_Click & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change pdf document security; can print pdf security
VB Imaging - VB Codabar Generator
check digit function for user's security consideration. also creates Codabar bar code on PDF, WORD, TIFF Able to adjust parameter settings before encoding, like
decrypt pdf; create secure pdf online
5
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A: 
Roundtable Series Overview 33
APPENDIX B: 
Roundtable Guiding Principles 34
APPENDIX C: 
Roundtable Participants 35
APPENDIX D: 
Roundtable Process 36
APPENDIX E: 
Roundtable Assessment: Best Practice and Ideal Practice 38
APPENDIX F: 
Unaccompanied Immigrant Minors – System Overview 41
APPENDIX G.1: 
UC Decision Tree: Apprehension 42
APPENDIX G.2: 
UC Decision Tree: Shelter 43
APPENDIX G.3: 
UC Decision Tree: Release 44
APPENDIX H: 
Post-Release, Study Summary and Policy Recommendations 
45
APPENDIX I: 
LIRS & UMBC Research: Assessing Need & Utilization of 
Community Services Among Unaccompanied Children 49
APPENDIX J: 
Child Protection Laws Regarding Unaccompanied Children 52
APPENDIX K:
Roundtable Acronyms 56
6
At the Crossroads 
for Unaccompanied 
Migrant Children
Policy, Practice, & Protection
7
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Children separated from their parents are among the 
most vulnerable of migrant populations. This heart 
wrenching reality, brought vividly before the public eye in 
the news coverage of the large-scale flight of unaccompanied 
children from Central America in the summer of 2014, has 
informed critical aspects of U.S. government policy for many 
years. Yet, systemic protections for unaccompanied and 
separated children have also been repeatedly and consistently 
undermined by immigration enforcement measures that fail to 
take into account our nation’s child welfare responsibilities or 
the unique legal and developmental needs of children. 
Caught in the volatile crosswinds of immigration politics, the 
U.S. government has struggled for decades with the appropriate 
treatment of unaccompanied and separated children crossing the 
southern U.S. border.  Today, as policymakers attempt to find a 
new balance in light of the large numbers of Central Americans 
who have crossed our border—with tragic stories of the violence 
they left behind—it is essential that our approach recognizes the 
extreme vulnerabilities of children who migrate alone. 
This report by Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service 
(LIRS) offers a range of policy and practice recommendations 
for the care and protection of unaccompanied children, 
informed by a series of three “Roundtable” meetings convened 
by LIRS in 2014 to consider current practice and ideal practice 
with unaccompanied children. The report that follows 
describes current policy and practice challenges and includes 
a set of fundamental principles for approaching work with 
unaccompanied children, as well as a comprehensive set of 
recommendations geared primarily towards U.S. government 
decision makers with responsibility for treatment of 
unaccompanied children. As a faith-based national organization 
with more than forty years of experience serving unaccompanied 
refugee and migrant children, LIRS puts forward these 
recommendations in a spirit of public-private collaboration and 
with an abiding interest in the protection of children.
In FY 2014, over 68,000 children were apprehended, of whom 
51,705 were from the Northern Triangle countries of Central 
America—El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras—where rates 
of violence exceed that in recognized war zones. The proportion 
of girls and younger children also increased, creating greater 
risks. This marked increase in child migration highlighted 
various protection gaps in the systems serving unaccompanied 
children. Among those detailed in this report are the following: 
the flawed screening process at the border, which excludes 
many children from protection on the basis of nationality 
rather than individual circumstances; the use of inappropriate 
holding and institutional facilities both at the border and upon 
subsequent transfer; weaknesses in the system of placement, 
reunification and follow-up that fail to fully ensure children’s 
safety; the clear inadequacy of legal representation for 
children (despite heroic volunteer efforts); and budget-driven 
imperatives to fast-track procedures for children.
Based on the policy, practice, and protection wisdom of 
participants in these Roundtable meetings, LIRS developed 
a set of child protection principles to guide governmental 
and non-governmental work with unaccompanied children.  
These principles, laid out in the report, have now been 
endorsed by a wide range of organizations with an interest in 
the treatment of separated and unaccompanied children, and 
undergird the recommendations we make.
The President, the U.S. Congress, and federal government agencies 
must not lose sight of their legal, moral, and ethical responsibility 
to keep vulnerable children safe from harm. We have a proud 
tradition of extending protection to those who seek refuge on our 
shores.  It is time to stop giving in to passing financial, political, 
and institutional pressures—with the lives of children at stake—and 
instead to commit to a consistent principled approach to the care 
and custody of unaccompanied migrant children.
SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS
• Apprehension, Screening, and Referral to the Office of 
Refugee Resettlement: Department of Homeland Security 
and its federal agencies should develop both standard 
and emergency plans for the care of children in the least 
restrictive environment appropriate to their needs and 
vulnerabilities, utilizing child welfare professionals and 
legal service providers, implementing expeditious transfers 
to the Office of Refugee Resettlement custody, and building 
in procedural accountability.
• Access to Justice: Congress, the Department of Justice, 
Department of Homeland Security, and Health and Human 
8
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
Services should maintain and build upon existing legal 
protections for unaccompanied children, ensuring that 
unaccompanied children have access to legal counsel and 
Child Advocates (guardians ad litem) to protect their legal 
and best interests, including “Know Your Rights” information, 
Legal Orientation Programs for Custodians, and access to 
legal proceedings with substantive and procedural integrity, 
resulting in legal protection for this vulnerable population and 
safe repatriation for those who are returned.
• Family Reunification: The Office of Refugee Resettlement 
and its programming partners should prioritize child 
protection and safety in reunification decisions by revising 
assessment tools, improving collaboration, and preparing 
children and families for successful reunifications.
• Post-Release Services: Congress should mandate, and the 
Office of Refugee Resettlement should create, a continuum 
of post-release services so that every child released from 
the Office of Refugee Resettlement custody receives some 
level of follow-up contact in order to safeguard children 
by connecting them with educational, legal, and child 
welfare resources; Office of Refugee Resettlement and its 
programming partners should support and engage local 
community-based service providers that help children and 
their sponsor caregivers over the longer term so they are 
equipped to meet the needs of unaccompanied children 
and their sponsor caregivers.
• Improving Coordination: Department of Homeland 
Security, Department  of Justice, and the Office of Refugee 
Resettlement should develop effective and efficient methods 
of coordination that place child protection at the center of 
cooperative efforts and set an example for staff, partners, 
and stakeholders; non-governmental organizations should 
proactively seek out areas for collaboration that better serve 
unaccompanied children and build on existing best practices.
• Oversight and Accountability: Congress, Department 
of Homeland Security, and Health and Human Services 
should implement systems of checks and balances 
through creation of monitoring and compliance systems 
regarding the Prison Rape Elimination Act, Trafficking 
Victims’ Protection Act, child protection and human 
rights, Significant Incident Reports, and Ombudsman’s 
offices that monitor children’s issues.
PREFACE
In late 2013, LIRS launched a Roundtable consultation 
process to bring together a wide range of experts on the care 
and treatment of unaccompanied children for the purpose of 
developing shared principles and informing recommendations 
for improvements to the system. Three Roundtable meetings 
took place in 2014, with the last occurring against the backdrop 
of the dramatic rise in child migration from Central America and 
Mexico over the summer of 2014.   
With this rise in migration, many of the systems and processes 
that had been in place for years were thrown into crisis.  
Resource constraints were severe, and at the height of the 
crisis, some established legal or child welfare safeguards 
were either set aside or compromised.  Since then, as the 
flow of migration to the United States has abated (at least 
temporarily), the child-serving system has continued in a 
state of flux, restoring safeguards and practices in some areas, 
maintaining measures initiated during the crisis in others, and 
in yet other cases, evolving new policies and procedures.  
The political climate has also changed with the migration of 
Central American children as a flashpoint in the unfolding 
debate over immigration policy.  Provisions that Congress made 
for the protection and care of children in years past are under 
new scrutiny and face the possibility of repeal or amendment.   
It is against this volatile background that LIRS has prepared 
this report with an even more powerful sense of urgency to 
ensure that the rights and interests of children are protected.  
It should be noted that this report addresses U.S. policies and 
procedures towards children who come to the United States 
unaccompanied by a parent or legal guardian. An equally 
compelling policy concern—although one not within the scope 
of this report—involves those children who are accompanied 
by a parent or guardian when they enter the United States 
(“accompanied children”).  In the summer of 2014, the federal 
government opened large family detention facilities in Karnes, 
TX, and Artesia, NM, receiving widespread criticism of both 
the conditions of confinement and the immigration legal 
proceedings.
1
The re-establishment of family detention is a 
shameful new chapter, and the toll on children’s well-being 
is of particular concern.  On this topic, we refer readers to 
9
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
INTRODUCTION
Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS) has worked 
with unaccompanied refugee and immigrant children in 
the United States for nearly forty years. We are one of two 
organizations providing foster care to unaccompanied refugee 
youth who are admitted through the United States’ refugee 
resettlement program.  We have provided foster care and 
family reunification services to Central American and Mexican 
children since 2003, and to Chinese and Indian children in the 
decade before that.  This historical viewpoint and cumulative 
experience affords a unique opportunity to offer insight and 
recommendations on the United States’ current responses to 
unaccompanied children coming from Central America and 
other countries. LIRS puts forward these recommendations 
in a spirit of public-private collaboration and with an abiding 
interest in the protection of children.
For several years, the number of unaccompanied children 
from Central America and Mexico who are apprehended 
while seeking to enter the United States has been on 
the increase.  In FY 2014, over 68,000 unaccompanied 
children were apprehended, of whom 51,705 were from the 
Northern Triangle countries of Central America:  El Salvador, 
Guatemala, and Honduras.
3
Children come unaccompanied 
to the United States for a range of reasons, including safety, 
family reunification, economic need and opportunity, or a 
combination of these factors.  Several recent reports have 
established a clear causal link between the rising violence in 
Central America and Mexico and the migration of children 
who are unaccompanied by parents or caregivers.
4
Children separated from their parents due to, or during, 
migration are vulnerable to a wide range of risks, such as sex 
our companion report, Locking Up Family Values, Again: The 
Continued Failure of Immigration Family Detention, published 
by LIRS and The Women’s Refugee Commission in October 
2014, which updated an earlier 2007 report.  In our report 
we conclude, “…our findings again illustrate that large-scale 
family detention results in egregious violations of our country’s 
obligations under international law, undercuts individual 
due process rights, and sets a poor example for the rest of the 
world.”
2
The Artesia facility is now closed, but a new and even 
larger family detention facility has since been opened in Dilley, 
TX, with the capacity to detain up to 2,400 women and children.
trafficking, child labor, kidnap and ransom by smugglers, 
forcible recruitment by criminals or armed factions, 
homelessness, teen pregnancy, physical deprivation, 
and violence and trauma. The absence of adult care and 
protection, in combination with a child’s lack of maturity and 
inherent dependence, make unaccompanied children among 
the most vulnerable of migrant populations. 
The United States has a long tradition of welcoming newcomers 
and protecting the vulnerable, yet—notwithstanding this 
protective tradition—the U.S. government has wrestled for 
decades with the appropriate treatment of unaccompanied and 
separated children crossing the southern U.S. border, vacillating 
between policies that emphasize enforcement priorities on the 
one hand, and those that address child welfare responsibilities 
and the unique legal situation of children on the other. 
5
Viewed over a twenty-year span, the United States’ treatment 
of unaccompanied and separated children
6
has become 
more sensitive to the unique developmental needs, inherent 
dependence, and fundamental vulnerabilities of children.  
Critical policy changes have resulted from legal action, such as 
the 1997 Flores Settlement Agreement,
7
or have been effected 
through the enactment of legislation.
8
The recommendations contained in this report are an important 
step in continued forward movement to protect migrant children 
in the continuously recalibrated balance of federal priorities.  The 
sharp increase in migration from Central America and Mexico has 
unfortunately made the task more difficult, as the heated rhetoric 
on immigration and increased political pressure to heighten 
In this municipality, just like in many others, it is possible to get on 
a train only when in motion. Private guards prevent access to the 
station. In the south it is common for hundreds of undocumented 
people to travel in a single train.
Photo credit: Ruido. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested