pdf to jpg c# open source : Create secure pdf online Library software class asp.net windows .net ajax LIRS_RoundtableReport_WEB1-part587

10
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
enforcement create a poor climate for reform and may actually 
erode child protections previously secured.
In 2014, against the backdrop of the increase in the numbers 
of unaccompanied children entering the United States, LIRS 
brought together over 40 national and local experts in a 
series of three full-day Roundtable meetings in Washington, 
DC to consider these fundamental questions regarding 
unaccompanied children: 
1. Exploration: What is current practice? The first 
Roundtable assessed existing policies and services, 
including ideal service models, current challenges, and 
promising practices. (March 18, 2014) 
2. Convergence: What should current practice be? The 
second Roundtable identified potential solutions to 
current challenges and methods for achieving desired 
change. (May 29, 2014) 
3. Action: How do we achieve ideal practice? The final 
Roundtable prioritized key policy and practice 
improvements and developed a shared vision for 
accomplishing change, both as a group and as individual 
organizations.  The intense media attention, heated 
Congressional hearings, and variety of proposed and actual 
policy changes in response to what the U.S. government 
deemed a “humanitarian crisis” created a tangible urgency 
for the collective deliberations. (July 16, 2014) 
The practice expertise of these inter-disciplinary professionals 
provided the foundational background for LIRS as we drafted 
this report and developed the concrete recommendations for 
a coherent protective approach to unaccompanied children, 
consistent with current child welfare and refugee protection 
principles.  All Roundtable participants had a role to play in 
the formulation of the overarching principles; however, the 
recommendations were developed by LIRS and do not necessarily 
have the endorsement of the participants.  
The recommendations of this report are also drawn from the 
following important resources:
• Child welfare principles from nationally recognized sources: 
o The Child Welfare Information Gateway of the 
Children’s Bureau (Administration for Children and 
Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human 
Services): www.childwelfare.gov 
o The Child Welfare League of America’s National 
Blueprint for Excellence in Child Welfare (2013): http://
www.cwla.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/
BlueprintExecutiveSummary1.pdf 
• United States law and legal precedent: 
o United States laws and court decisions relevant to 
unaccompanied children: http://www.ecfr.gov 
• International treaties and guidance: 
o The Convention on the Rights of the Child
o The 1951 Convention and 1967 Protocol Relating to 
the Status of Refugees
o Guidance on unaccompanied children from the 
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees 
(UNHCR): www.refworld.org 
The report is structured in four parts. We begin with a brief 
overview of the legal and policy framework, followed by a 
discussion of the current context, practices, and challenges.  
Then, we present a set of principles developed out of the LIRS 
Children’s Roundtable process, which we believe should guide 
policy and practice with unaccompanied minors.  Finally, the 
report concludes with recommendations to the U.S. federal 
government agencies and entities that have responsibility for 
the care and treatment of unaccompanied children. 
LEGAL AND POLICY FRAMEWORK
The distinctive needs of unaccompanied children have been 
recognized in a number of important international legal 
instruments. The drafting conference for the 1951 Convention 
Relating to the Status of Refugees, in which the United States 
participated, unanimously adopted a recommendation for 
governments to protect, “…refugees who are minors, in particular 
unaccompanied children and girls…”.
9
The Convention on the 
Rights of the Child also specifically mentions The United States’ 
responsibilities to provide protection and assistance to refuge-
seeking children, whether unaccompanied or accompanied.
10
In keeping with these international treaties, the United Nations 
Refugee Agency (UNHCR) has produced numerous resources 
and reports detailing the special needs of unaccompanied and 
separated children,
11
and the U.S. government has developed 
Create secure pdf online - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change security settings pdf; pdf security
Create secure pdf online - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
create pdf security; pdf security options
11
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
systems of specialized care for unaccompanied children who 
come to the United States as planned arrivals (e.g., through the 
U.S. refugee resettlement program)
12
and as unplanned arrivals 
(e.g., those encountered by immigration authorities, particularly 
along the southern U.S. border).
13
National and international 
organizations have developed specialized identification and 
caregiving procedures to protect unaccompanied children from the 
abuse, neglect, and exploitation to which they are susceptible.
14
A variety of U.S. laws and legal decisions provide the legal 
framework and authority from which current policies and 
programs towards unaccompanied children have developed. 
Described below are some of the most significant pillars of 
the legal guidance. Further detail is provided in Appendix J.
Refugee Act of 1980 
With passage of the Refugee Act of 1980, Congress approved 
the first major overhaul of U.S. refugee resettlement policy since 
1952. This legislation brought the United States into conformity 
with its treaty obligations as a signatory to the United Nations 
1951 Convention and the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status 
of Refugees,
15
implemented an asylum process for those 
needing protection after arrival to the United States, and 
removed anachronistic language so that refugee protection 
was available beyond merely those fleeing communism or 
the Middle East.
16
Furthermore, this legislation affirmed the 
principle of non-refoulement (forbids the return of a victim to his 
or her prosecutor) and the U.S. responsibility to not return to 
danger those whose life or freedom is threatened.
The Refugee Act of 1980 also included special provisions for 
providing care and supervision of unaccompanied refugee 
children, leading to the development of a network of specialized 
refugee foster care programs for unaccompanied refugee minors 
resettled in the U.S.
17
Thus, the Refugee Act of 1980 demonstrates 
the United States’ historical recognition of the vulnerabilities of 
unaccompanied children needing protection and our nation’s 
commitment to providing appropriate protection and care.
❖Flores Settlement Agreement
In 1997, the U.S. District Court for the Central District of 
California approved the Flores Settlement Agreement in 
response to a lawsuit brought by various organizations against 
the former Immigration and Naturalization Service, and by 
extension the U.S. Attorney General. The Flores Settlement 
Agreement required the U.S. government to observe certain 
due process, including custody and release provisions with 
respect to children in federal custody for immigration reasons. 
Specifically, the agreement stipulates that the federal government 
must provide safe and sanitary care for children consistent 
with children’s vulnerabilities and ensure their safety and 
well-being. While children are in federal custody, government-
funded programs for unaccompanied children are required to 
provide services such as food and shelter, health and mental 
health care, basic education, recreation, access to religious 
services, case management, and family reunification services. 
Furthermore, the Flores Settlement Agreement requires that 
children be placed in the least restrictive setting, in accordance 
with child welfare principles, and it established a preference for 
reunification with family members over continued government 
detention. A little more than ten years after the Flores Settlement 
Agreement, many of the standards from this agreement were 
eventually incorporated into the Trafficking Victims Protection 
Reauthorization Act of 2008 (TVPRA). 
❖Homeland Security Act of 2002
Following years of advocacy, investigative reporting, and 
litigation,
18
the system for dealing with unaccompanied children 
who enter the United States without immigration documents 
changed significantly in 2002 with passage of the Homeland 
Security Act (HSA), which transferred unaccompanied children’s 
care and custody responsibilities from the former Immigration 
and Naturalization Service (INS) to the existing Office of Refugee 
Resettlement (ORR), within the U.S. Department of Health 
and Human Services where ORR also had the responsibility of 
resettling unaccompanied refugee minors (URM). Under the 
former-INS, perennial problems included the lengthy detention 
of children (for months to even years) with no placement review 
process, lack of trauma-informed care, the use of jail-like detention 
facilities, physical restraints such as shackles, commingling with 
juvenile offenders for children who had not committed crimes, 
arbitrary decision making, and an intrinsic conflict of interest 
in being simultaneously responsible for both removal and 
caretaking in relation to children. Fundamentally, the structural 
change made by the HSA moved decision-making power from a 
government agency focused primarily on law enforcement, to a 
government agency focused primarily on human service needs 
and with expertise in migration and child welfare matters. The 
long-term implications of this change should not be overlooked, 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF document file creating library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK for a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry
copy from locked pdf; copy text from encrypted pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
PDF Viewer enable users to view create PDF from multiple PDF Editor also provides C#.NET users secure solutions for to set a password to PDF online directly in
copy locked pdf; decrypt pdf without password
12
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
as it represents a tangible recognition of the U.S. government’s 
responsibility to treat unaccompanied minors as children first 
and foremost.
❖The William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection 
Reauthorization Act of 2008
In December 2008, then-President George W. Bush signed 
into law the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization 
Act (TVPRA), initially passed in 2000 and reauthorized in 
2003, 2005, 2008, and 2013. The TVPRA of 2008 recognized 
the inherent trafficking risks and unique vulnerabilities 
of children outside the care of a parent or guardian and 
implemented greater protection measures for unaccompanied 
children. The TVPRA took important steps to improve the 
protection of children by building on existing U.S. procedures 
and handling children’s cases in a more sensitive manner.  
Children seeking asylum protection can now be initially 
interviewed in an office setting by U.S. asylum officers trained 
to hear children’s claims, rather than having their asylum 
cases handled and cross-examined in the more intimidating 
and formal immigration court process. Recognizing a child’s 
inability to navigate U.S. immigration procedures alone, 
the TVPRA expanded children’s access to pro bono counsel. 
Finally, the TVPRA codified the existing federal practice of 
ensuring child welfare protections were incorporated into the 
custody of unaccompanied immigrant children. This included 
procedural protections to intercept trafficking and guarantee 
a child’s right to a hearing before a judge. This practice 
safeguards due process for non-Mexican children, rather than 
perpetuating a migratory “revolving door” that can enable the 
trafficking of children. Concerns with the implementation 
of the TVPRA—and the current threat that the law may be 
rescinded or modified to the detriment of child protection—are 
explored in the following sections.
CURRENT CONTEXT, PRACTICES, 
AND CHALLENGES
A majority of the unaccompanied children coming to 
the United States report having fled violence, abuse and 
deprivation in Central America.  Although the reasons for 
migration are complex, a significant factor in the countries 
of Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala is the endemic 
violence from gangs and other armed criminal actors.  In 
Honduras, homicide levels surpass that in the worst war 
zones of South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of 
the Congo.
19
A United Nations study of global homicide 
identified Honduras as the most violent country in the 
world,
20
and U.S. Borders and Custom Protection (CBP) 
data indicated San Pedro Sula (Honduras’ second largest 
city) as the most common city of origin for unaccompanied 
children.
21, 22
El Salvador and Guatemala ranked fourth and 
fifth in global homicide rates.
23
In 2014, the United Nations High Commissioner for 
Refugees (UNHCR) issued a report—Children on the Run—
based on more than 400 interviews with unaccompanied 
children from Central America and Mexico.  The report 
found that 58% of the children UNHCR interviewed in 
ORR and Customs and Border Protection custody disclosed 
reasons for their flight warranting international protection, 
including harm from organized armed criminal actors and 
violence in the home.
24
Since 2008 other countries in the 
region—such as Belize, Costa Rica, Mexico, Nicaragua, and 
Panama—have noted a 712% increase in asylum applications 
from Salvadorans, Guatemalans, and Hondurans.
25
Beyond 
these reasons for flight, unaccompanied children are 
vulnerable to particular risks during migration, including 
trafficking, sexual assault, physical deprivation, violence, 
trauma, exploitation by criminals, kidnap and ransom, etc.
A rise in the numbers of unaccompanied children coming to the 
United States has been documented over the past several years, 
and advocates and service providers have been calling attention 
to the increasing child protection issues in a number of reports. 
From 2003 through 2011, the number of unaccompanied 
children in ORR custody was between 6,000 and 8,000 a year.
26
These numbers began to noticeably rise at the end of FY 2011, 
with nearly 14,000 children placed in ORR custody in FY 2012, 
nearly 25,000 in FY 2013, and over 57,000 unaccompanied 
children in ORR care in FY 2014.
27
It is worth noting that 
ORR receives into its care only a subset of the total number of 
unaccompanied children picked up at the border, since about 
95% of Mexican unaccompanied minors are returned to Mexico 
within 72 hours.
28
In 2014 the total number of unaccompanied 
children who were apprehended by CBP was over 68,500.
29
Within the growing population of unaccompanied children 
coming to the United States, the proportion of girls and younger 
children has increased.  The Pew Research Center found that the 
apprehension of children ages 12 and under had increased by 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
XDoc.PDF SDK provides users secure methods to protect PDF added to a specific location on PDF file page. In addition, you can easily create, modify, and delete
secure pdf; pdf security password
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
Word SDK for .NET, is a robust & thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry
pdf secure signature; change security settings on pdf
13
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
117% between FY 2013 and the first eight months of FY 2014, 
while the number of girls increased by 77% during that same 
period, with the largest increases across both categories coming 
from Honduran children.
30
This shifting demographic strongly 
suggests that current migration is being motivated by fear rather 
than economic opportunity.  In a related development, there 
has also been a dramatic increase in the migration of families 
with young children to the United States, with high percentages 
expressing a fear of return.
31
In the following sections, we describe policy and practice 
in the care and custody of unaccompanied children in 
the United States. We also describe the challenges posed 
by the current system.  This current system overview was 
heavily informed by the input of the participants in the three 
Roundtables that LIRS organized in 2014.
A System in Crisis
Current practice. An array of federal agencies, spread 
across different federal departments, touch the lives of 
unaccompanied children in varying ways, including the 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Department 
for Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Department 
of Justice. This system for responding to unaccompanied 
minors has been in constant flux for over a decade, and the 
operational infrastructure has never completely caught up 
with the changes that have been mandated.  Even before 
the steep rise in numbers in the summer of 2014, which 
overwhelmed existing resources and capacity, the system has 
been subject to repeated shifts in policy and procedure whose 
full consequences are not well anticipated, and that are not 
always clearly developed as guidance to the field, leaving a 
patchwork of differing interpretations and approaches.
Challenges. A strong child welfare system ideally has an 
intentional approach to balancing the various interests at 
stake and operates in a predictable manner.  When all of the 
players in the system are buffeted with changing directives, 
some of which undermine other aspects of the established 
framework, children fall through the cracks. 
Apprehension and Custody of Unaccompanied Children 
Current Practice. In almost all instances, the initial government 
encounter with unaccompanied children occurs at the point of 
apprehension—by Customs and Border Protection’s U.S. Border 
Patrol (USBP) near the southern U.S. border, or less often by 
Customs and Border Protection’s Office of Field Operations (OFO) 
at official ports of entry. In 2014, over 70% of the unaccompanied 
children who were identified as having entered the United 
States without proper documents, or who came through official 
inspection sites, were apprehended by U.S. Border Patrol in 
the South Texas Rio Grande Sector.
32
Upon apprehension, agents 
take children to short-term holding facilities with conditions that 
range from enclosed cells with cinderblock benches and open 
toilets, to portable modular units or outdoor cages.  Under the 
terms of the Flores Settlement Agreement, children from non-
contiguous countries must be transferred to the custody of ORR 
as quickly as possible, and within no more than 72 hours.  During 
the summer of 2014 when the number of refugee children from 
Central America was at an all-time high, ORR did not have the 
bed space to place children. As a result, some children remained 
in over-crowded CBP stations for weeks at a time. To mitigate the 
situation at the over-crowded CBP stations in McAllen and Nogales, 
Texas, CBP opened three large warehouse-style processing 
centers (“Service Processing Centers”) at Lackland Air Force 
Base (TX), Naval Base Ventura County (CA), and Fort Sill (OK).
Challenges. U.S. Border Patrol holding facilities and other 
holding facilities or processing centers are neither designed 
for nor appropriate for children. Both children and adults refer 
to the temporary holding facilities as “hieleras” (Spanish for 
“freezers”) due to their cold temperature.
33
Immense Service 
Processing Centers are neither designed for nor appropriate 
The first kilometers of this route force migrants to cross sections on foot. 
To avoid roads they venture into areas of dense vegetation. La Arrocera 
is one of these spots and is famous among migratory routes for being 
scenery of continuous assault and rape perpetrated by native groups.
Photo credit: Ruido. 
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
SDK for .NET, is a robust & thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry
pdf encryption; convert secure pdf to word
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
& thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry Create Word From PDF.
pdf file security; pdf security settings
14
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
for the care of children and conflict with basic child welfare 
standards of placing children in the least restrictive and most 
family-like setting appropriate to their needs. 
In June 2014, a coalition of six legal advocacy organizations 
filed a formal complaint against CBP with the DHS Office for 
Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, as well as the DHS Office of 
Inspector General, on behalf of 116 unaccompanied children 
between the ages of 5 and 17.
34
The complaint alleges abuse 
and mistreatment against these children while in CBP custody, 
including physical abuse, sexual assault, beatings, use of 
stress positions, verbal abuse, denial of food and medical care, 
unsanitary conditions, shackling, and custody beyond the 72 
hour maximum stipulated under the TVPRA.
35
In addition to enduring poor conditions and treatment, 
children in CBP custody do not have lawyers or Child 
Advocates and have limited assistance, knowledge, or even 
phone access to try and secure such help. This means that 
unaccompanied children in CBP custody are almost always 
interrogated alone by law enforcement officials lacking 
child welfare interviewing expertise, whether CBP agents 
or other federal law enforcement agents, without any legal 
representation or legal guardian present.  This practice is 
counter to good practice in child welfare and basic due process 
with vulnerable populations.
Lack of Protections for Unaccompanied Children from 
Contiguous Countries (i.e. Mexico & Canada)
Current Practice. Children from contiguous countries (Mexico 
and Canada) have separate processing procedures under the 
TVPRA that result in rapid return for most. The procedures 
require DHS to make a determination that these unaccompanied 
children are neither trafficking victims nor children with a fear of 
return, and that they are able to make an independent decision to 
withdraw their application of admission.
36
In practice, this policy 
applies overwhelmingly to Mexican children. These regulations 
also stipulate that unaccompanied children should be returned 
to child welfare authorities during normal business hours (so 
that children are not returned without support in the middle of 
the night, raising serious safety issues), and without a lasting 
charge on the child’s U.S. immigration record.
Under the TVPRA, DHS (in practice CBP) must make these 
determinations within 48 hours. If CBP is not able to do so 
in a timely manner, then children from contiguous countries 
must be transferred to the custody of the ORR, just as 
children from non-contiguous countries.
37
Challenges. The TVPRA-mandated special screening of children 
from non-contiguous countries was implemented to ensure that 
children (almost always Mexican) receive protections required 
under the U.S. Refugee Act
38
and to ensure that children are not 
returned to trafficking situations. However, the implementation 
of this screening is largely perfunctory and does not accomplish 
its protective intent.
39
This results in CBP routinely returning 
unaccompanied Mexican children—many of whom face severe 
risks from violent criminal actors or traffickers—without a 
thorough examination of children’s protection needs. Mexican 
unaccompanied children are routinely asked to make complex 
immigration decisions all on their own, without a lawyer or Child 
Advocate present. A child, by virtue of his or her very status as a 
child, lacks the necessary capacity to consent to a withdrawal of 
an application of admission without a legal guardian, lawyer, or 
Child Advocate assisting him or her in the process.  
The current U.S. system for processing Mexican unaccompanied 
children has, for all intents and purposes, created a two-tiered 
system of processing for these children: Mexican children 
are rarely given access to protective and due process legal 
procedures, while Central American and other children have 
access to protective measures as a matter of standard practice. 
Over the past decade, the U.S. screening and adjudication process 
for Central American children has become increasingly child-
sensitive; however, Mexican children are virtually excluded from 
these approaches and instead face fast-track return procedures. 
As a result, Central American children make up 93% of children 
in ORR custody, and Mexican unaccompanied children make up 
only 3%, a ratio that is not reflective of the protection need.
40
Custody, Transport, and Return of Unaccompanied Children
Current Practice. Practices for the transport of children are 
evolving and differ depending on where children are being taken.  
Until this past summer, agents from Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement (ICE) have had the responsibility for physically 
transporting children to ORR facilities that are located far from 
the border. This responsibility has rested with ICE’s Juvenile and 
Family Residential Management Unit (JFRMU). On the other 
hand, if the destination ORR facility is located near the border, it is 
CBP officers who transport children. Typically both ICE and CBP 
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
please copy and email the secure download link via the email which RasterEdge's online store sends. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf password unlock; can print pdf security
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
be achieved through clicking "Open an online document" button search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office text selecting in order to secure your web
copy text from locked pdf; pdf unlock
15
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
agents are armed and in uniform.  Children may be transported 
in federal vehicles or in vehicles contracted from private transport 
companies such as G4 and Trailboss.
As part of this transportation function, ICE at times places 
children in special short-term facilities during transit stopovers.  
Some of these are contracted by ICE for the purpose of holding a 
child in transport for under 72 hours, but children are also held in 
hotels or other inappropriate locations, such as secure juvenile 
detention facilities.  Over the past decade, with the responsibility 
for transport of children that came with the transfer of physical 
custody to ORR, ICE had started to expand its use of child 
appropriate shelters and instituting policies governing the 
hours when it is appropriate to transport children. 
Due to the high numbers of child migrants from Central 
America in the summer of 2014, ICE initiated a revision 
of transport procedures.  One impetus was to reduce the 
time burden on agents of accompanying large numbers 
of children being delivered to ORR facilities, but ICE 
also took into consideration NGO concerns about the 
inappropriateness of having law enforcement agents 
accompany children. In the fall of 2014, ICE’s JFRMU began 
using a private contractor, MVM Inc., which employs an array 
of professionals (from former law enforcement to child care 
workers) who are assigned depending on an individualized 
assessment of the child’s needs and safety factors. These 
transport agents are unarmed and not in law enforcement 
uniforms—recent changes that have the potential to make 
these agents less intimidating to children.  
In addition to transport to ORR facilities, ICE is responsible 
for returning unaccompanied children to their countries of 
origin. To accomplish this, ICE agents accompany children to 
the home country and physically transfer custody of the child 
to a representative of the child’s home country. Alternatively, 
unaccompanied minors can be returned on Justice Prisoner 
& Alien Transportation (JPATS) flights operated by the U.S. 
Marshals Service.  
Challenges. There are periodic concerns with transportation 
practices that become more frequent during periods of 
higher child migration flows. These concerns include 
transporting children in the middle of night, using federal 
law enforcement personnel instead of contracting with child-
appropriate workers, and using unsuitable accommodations 
for stopovers during transport. While ICE’s JFRMU 
expanded use of child appropriate shelters and civilian-
clothed childcare professionals are important steps in the 
right direction, the specific contract with MVM, Inc. that was 
entered into in the fall of 2014 remains to be evaluated. 
Placement of Unaccompanied Children 
Current Practice. Under the TVPRA, ORR is required to promptly 
place unaccompanied children “in the least restrictive setting 
that is in the best interest of the child.”
41
The Homeland Security 
Act (HSA) similarly requires ORR to ensure that the “interests 
of the child are considered” in unaccompanied children’s care 
and custody decisions and actions.
42
The Flores Settlement 
agreement stipulates the release priorities for unaccompanied 
children, in this order: parent, legal guardian, adult relative, or 
adult designated by the parent or guardian to licensed programs 
and others approved by ORR.
43
Once unaccompanied children are transferred to the care and 
custody of ORR, most are placed within a nationwide network 
of child-oriented shelter programs. Shelters are funded by ORR 
and operated by non-governmental organizations (both large 
and small, national and local, faith-based and secular), or in some 
cases by local governments that contract with ORR to provide 
a structured and supervised residential care environment. 
Under the HSA, ORR has responsibility for care and placement 
determinations, oversight and inspection of facilities, family 
reunification, maintenance of statistical information, planning to 
ensure legal counsel, and maintenance of information on Child 
Advocate and legal representation resources.
Shelter programs range from large institutional shelters 
housing hundreds of children, to mid-size facilities, to small 
group home-like settings. In addition to shelters, ORR 
contracts with a number of foster care programs around 
the United States which provide care for the youngest, 
most vulnerable children, and for trafficked, pregnant, 
and parenting teens. ORR also contracts with a few 
secure juvenile detention facilities and with residential or 
therapeutic treatment centers for children with behavioral 
health needs. 
The following chart describes the numbers of facilities or 
placement programs available for unaccompanied children.  
Because of the size of the facilities, the number of children 
VB.NET Word: VB Tutorial to Convert Word to Other Formats in .NET
Word converting assembly toolkit also allows developers to create a fully platforms, then converting Word to a more secure document format PDF will be
creating secure pdf files; creating a secure pdf document
C# Image: Zoom Image and Document Page in C#.NET Web Viewer
offers outstanding high performance and delivers secure & customizable bmp (bitmap), tiff / multi-page tiff, PDF, etc NET: Zoom In Image & Document Page Online.
create encrypted pdf; decrypt a pdf file online
16
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
in the shelter care programs is much higher than those in 
smaller programs such as foster care.
Having access to a range of care options for unaccompanied 
children—from foster care to group care to shelter care to secure 
care—is in keeping with both the Flores Settlement Agreement 
and the TVPRA legislation by enabling placement of children 
in the least restrictive setting appropriate to their individual 
needs.
44
The TVPRA further requires that any secure placement 
decisions be reviewed monthly, and the Flores Settlement 
grants children the right to judicial review of their placements if 
they disagree with the type of placement they are given.
45
Challenges. While ORR has access to a range of placement 
options, it primarily relies on large institutions for placing 
children. The federal government’s predominant reliance upon 
a large institutional model has been a concern since before 
custody of unaccompanied children was transferred from the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service to ORR.  Now that 
the custody of these children is under the Health and Human 
Service Department’s division of the Administration for 
Children and Families, the continued reliance on this model 
is perplexing. U.S. child welfare programs have decreased or 
eliminated institutional placements, except for children with 
the most complex health or mental health needs. Best practice 
standards for short-term shelters housing homeless and 
runaway youth set an upper limit at “no more than 20 children 
and youth at one location.”
46
It therefore remains troubling 
that large institutions continue to be the federal government’s 
primary care and custody model for unaccompanied children.
Home Studies Prior to Family Reunification
Current Practice. Unaccompanied children can be released 
from ORR custody to relatives or family friends who meet 
certain requirements (called “sponsors”). Under the provisions 
of the TVPRA, ORR is required to verify a sponsor’s identity 
and relationship to the child and to determine that the sponsor 
can provide for a child’s “physical and mental well-being” 
and does not pose a risk to the child.
47
Under the TVPRA, 
ORR is mandated to complete a home study for children in 
the following situations: child trafficking victims; children 
with disabilities or other special needs; children who have 
experienced physical or sexual abuse, or those with mental 
health issues.
48
LIRS is one of several national organizations 
able to conduct home studies across the country, a service 
provided by LIRS to ORR and the former INS since 1994. 
Home studies assess the suitability of a child’s placement 
with a particular sponsor through interviews with the child, 
caseworker, and family members; completion of a home 
visit and suitability assessment; and an analysis of other 
information related to the child’s specific needs. Home study 
reports include a recommendation about reunification with a 
particular sponsor, followed by a review and recommendation 
by a case coordinator (described below), after which ORR 
makes the final decision regarding reunification. 
Challenges. The federal government routinely requires home 
studies for separated refugee children reunifying with relatives 
in the United States under the U.S. Department of State’s refugee 
resettlement program.  The same principle should be applied in 
family placements involving this population of unaccompanied 
children; however, despite their common usage and requirement 
in other types of placement decisions involving children, ORR 
requests home studies on a very limited basis. Home studies are 
a protective and preventive measure in safeguarding children, 
Total Number of ORR Placement Options for Children
All programs are licensed in accordance with state and local 
child licensing laws
Placement Types
Fiscal 
Year 2014
Long-term foster care: Children with legal claims 
but no viable family sponsors are placed with 
foster families while their legal cases proceed.
16
Transitional foster care: Short-term, home-based 
placements with foster families, while family 
reunification is pursued. Reserved for young 
children, trafficking victims, pregnant or parent-
ing teens, and children with special needs.
19
Shelter: Facilities ranging in capacity from under 
20 children to over 200, usually privately run. 
Children are placed in shelters pending family 
reunification.
72
Residential treatment centers: Therapeutic pro-
grams ranging in security level for children with 
more severe mental health needs.
2
Staff-secure facilities: Medium secure juvenile 
detention facilities with lower staff-to-child ratios.
10
Secure facilities: Sub-contracted county juvenile 
detention facilities.
5
17
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
particularly when children have been separated from caregivers 
for many years, when children have not previously lived with a 
particular relative caregiver, or when identified risk factors are 
present.  A higher number of unaccompanied children fit this 
vulnerable profile than current home study usage reflects.
Case Coordination
Current Practice. Since 2010, ORR has relied upon General 
Dynamics Information Technology (GDIT) to provide case 
management services, as well as the review of home studies 
and sponsor documentation, to inform ORR’s release 
decisions for unaccompanied children. GDIT is a for-profit 
contracting agency whose traditional areas of expertise have 
been in defense, engineering, and information technology. 
For ORR contracts, GDIT employs child welfare professionals 
to conduct the review of family reunification or transfer 
documents and to make recommendations regarding release.
Challenges. What ORR currently calls “Case Coordination” 
(previously called a “Third-Party Review”) was originally 
designed to provide a neutral appraisal of reunification or 
transfer options.  Since GDIT took on this function, this 
process has moved away from a quasi-independent third 
party review approach—where an independent entity upholds 
the best interest of the child in a system replete with other 
institutional pressures—to functioning as ORR staff. 
In review meetings where release and transfer decisions are 
made, typically the only people present are the facility staff, the 
GDIT case coordinator, the ORR federal field supervisor (FFS), 
and sometimes an ICE agent. The child in question and his or 
her legal representative or Child Advocate are rarely allowed 
to participate or make a recommendation regarding these 
issues, nor is the child’s parent or legal guardian. The child’s 
wishes and legal concerns are not independently represented 
in the decision-making process, leaving the child and the legal 
guardian with little to no voice. A parent who has a child in 
ORR custody has no means to recommend a placement in 
an ORR facility near the parent, nor can he or she request a 
review regarding reunification decisions. Similarly, a child’s 
lawyer or Child Advocate may not have the opportunity to 
adequately express his or her concerns regarding the release 
of a child to an inappropriate caregiver or discuss how the 
transfer of a child may impact the child’s legal case. Finally, 
the ORR system provides for no neutral external review for 
the decisions made. While LIRS understands the need to 
subcontract out responsibilities of compliance monitoring for 
family reunification applications and transfer applications, the 
need for more systemic checks and balances remains.
Family Reunification Timeframes
Current Practice. For the majority of children, ORR facilitates 
placement with relatives or family friends living in the United 
States. Since ORR assumed responsibility for the care and 
custody of unaccompanied children, the amount of time that 
most children spend in federal custody prior to placement with 
sponsors has been steadily decreasing, in part as a response 
to budgetary pressures.  This trend became more noticeable 
starting in fall 2011 with the increase in the number of children 
in ORR custody.  Prior to this time, children remained in ORR 
custody for an average of 72 days. By the summer of 2012, 
ORR accelerated the placement of children with sponsors, 
with the average length of time in ORR custody ranging from 
40-45 days.
49
In early 2014, the average length of stay was 
approximately 35 days.
50
During the summer of 2014, as part 
of the U.S. government’s response to the large increase in 
unaccompanied children, ORR began placing children with 
U.S. relatives more rapidly and with less thorough background 
check procedures in order to reduce lengths of stay. With each 
significant increase in arrivals of unaccompanied children, ORR 
revised its reunification procedures in order to create bed space 
for children awaiting ORR placement from CBP holding cells. 
Challenges. ORR has issued a number of shifting directives to 
shelter care providers establishing “length of stay” goals for 
children in its custody. These directives appear to be driven 
by financial pressures rather than children’s best interests. 
In domestic child welfare situations, institutional interests 
are counter-balanced by the involvement of guardians ad 
litem and juvenile court judges who are not part of those 
institutions, yet in the U.S. system for unaccompanied 
children, even Child Advocates are dependent upon ORR for 
funding.  Despite the fact that ORR has potentially conflicting 
budgetary and caregiving interests, there is no external 
independent authority reviewing care and custody decisions.
Safe Release and Fingerprinting
Current Practice. Potential sponsors for unaccompanied 
children must undergo a fingerprint clearance and 
18
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
background check as part of the ORR documentation 
requirements established to protect the safety of the child. 
LIRS operates a national network of 20 fingerprinting sites 
located in nonprofit organizations.  The Safe Release Support 
fingerprinting program has been successful in providing 
a less costly and less intimidating location to complete 
sponsor processing and necessary paperwork, while also 
connecting families with local legal, health and mental health 
care, education, and social service providers.
Challenges. Working under tight timelines, ORR does not 
uniformly require or wait for fingerprint results before 
releasing children, which raises some serious safety 
concerns. The fingerprinting process is also often a critical 
missed opportunity to support sponsors and set children 
and families up for successful reunifications by providing 
additional sponsor orientation and education about the family 
reunification process, legal proceedings, school enrollment 
requirements, and community resources in order to create a 
safety net and support system for children and families.
Follow-Up Services
Current Practice. After release to their sponsors, and despite the 
significant challenges inherent in the reunification process, the 
percentage of released children who receive follow-up services 
fluctuates and is subject to allocation of funding. 
When follow-up services are provided, they greatly assist 
children and their families and provide a means to track 
the welfare of children for a period of time following 
release. Under the current system, the only children who 
routinely receive follow-up services are that small number 
(estimated at less than 15%) who were found to face a level 
of risk warranting a home study of the prospective sponsor.  
Recommendations for services to other children whose 
situations are tenuous are frequently denied by ORR. 
Where provided, follow-up services offer significant 
protections to unaccompanied children.  They emphasize 
safety, school enrollment, connection to legal assistance 
and local community services, and the critical importance 
of continuing with immigration proceedings. These services 
follow the child in the event the child changes address, and 
they include at minimum a monthly contact with the child, 
with home visits and reports required at 14-day, 60-day, 
and 180-day intervals after the child’s reunification with the 
sponsor. At 180 days after reunification, the child’s situation is 
assessed to determine whether continued follow-up services 
are needed, with extension requests decided upon by ORR. 
Challenges. The number and proportion of children receiving 
follow-up care is inadequate, and decision-making priorities 
regarding which children are initially referred and later 
extended remain unclear.  Service providers working with 
unaccompanied children report that many have suffered 
significant experiences of trauma, including as victims 
of violence, severe maltreatment, and sexual assault.  
Researchers evaluating follow-up services in four program 
locations found that, “Many UAC may be ‘at risk’ even if they 
are not flagged as such by detention center staff.”
51
Legal Services and Legal Representation
Current Practice. Children in ORR shelters are provided with 
an orientation to the legal system by nonprofit legal service 
organizations offering “Know Your Rights” presentations.  
Similarly, parents and sponsors in many communities where 
children go are provided with legal orientation presentations as 
part of the release process.  These presentations generally provide 
an overview of the legal process and legal options available, 
an individual screening to determine potential legal options, 
and information on securing legal representation.  They do not 
guarantee legal representation during immigration proceedings.
The Guatemalan Melisa and Beverly, 24 and 7 years old, inside one 
of the coaches that go toward Ixtepec. In Tapachula, Chiapas, they 
were intercepted by agents of the National Migration Institute to 
whom they had to deliver 1,000 pesos (about $100) in order for 
them to be able to continue their journey.
Photo credit: Ruido. 
19
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
Legal service funding increased significantly in 2014, yet so 
did the number of children needing legal assistance. Children 
still come to immigration court alone and unrepresented, 
left to navigate a complex system in a foreign language with 
far-reaching implications for their safety and well-being. The 
issues and consequences addressed in immigration court are 
arguably similar in magnitude to those dealt with in juvenile 
court, where children are assured either legal representation, 
a guardian ad litem, or both. Nonetheless, unaccompanied 
children lack the protections children have in juvenile court 
and at best navigate a patchwork of legal services, with many 
receiving no representation at all. 
Ultimately, there remains no guarantee of government-
appointed legal counsel for minors in immigration 
proceedings, meaning that children still face immigration 
court and removal proceedings alone. While families and 
children are allowed to obtain their own legal representation, 
most children and their families do not have the financial 
resources to pay for a private attorney.
52
ORR and the 
Department of Justice provide some funding for legal 
representation, but, despite additional funding and the 
establishment of a “Justice AmeriCorps” in 2014, the gap 
between the need and available legal services grew wider.
53
The Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse of Syracuse 
University, which maintains statistics on the legal process, 
reports that children make up about 11% of the immigration 
court caseload.
54
Moreover, “The representation rate of 
children in immigration court has dropped precipitously, from 
71% in 2012 to as low as 14-15% in some months of 2014. As 
data on case outcomes indicates, legal representation vastly 
increases the chances that a child will appear in immigration 
court: Over the last decade, only 6.1% of children with counsel 
received in absentia (in the child’s absence) removal orders, 
compared with 64.2% of unrepresented children.”
55
Challenges. Increased DOJ and ORR funding for legal 
representation is a welcome move in the right direction, but it 
is not enough.  Nonprofit organizations and the pro bono legal 
community simply do not have the capacity to fully meet the 
need.  As a result, many children are unrepresented. The rapid 
and constant turnover of children within shelter facilities and 
in an absence of safeguards in the legal system, create a serious 
challenge to effective and child appropriate legal rights and 
representation services.
56
Many children are released from ORR 
custody before they have attended a presentation. Nonprofit and 
volunteer legal service providers are unable to individually screen 
all children in order to identify those with possible legal relief. 
Furthermore, limits on the DOJ “Justice AmeriCorps” funding 
means that youth ages 16 and 17, the largest segment of 
the unaccompanied minor population, are excluded from 
being helped by the program. Thus, a significant number of 
unaccompanied children may be ordered removed because they 
lack an attorney, not because they lack a claim to legal protection.  
Child Advocates
Current Practice. The TVPRA authorized ORR to appoint “Child 
Advocates” (immigration guardians ad litem) for children 
in immigration proceedings. While attorneys represent a 
child’s expressed wishes, Child Advocates are intended to 
represent a child’s best interests within immigration custody 
and proceedings. Conceptually similar to guardians ad 
litem in juvenile court, Child Advocates are appointed to the 
most vulnerable unaccompanied children in immigration 
proceedings, such as children acting against their own best 
interests (e.g., asking to be placed in, or returned to, harmful 
or life-threatening situations). In other cases, children may 
be too young to participate in proceedings, they may have a 
mental health issue or physical disability, there may be a custody 
dispute over which parent or relative should care for the child, 
the child’s wishes may differ from the parent’s wishes for the 
child, or there may be other complicated situations in which 
there is disagreement about what is best for a particular child. In 
these types of cases, a Child Advocate meets regularly with the 
child to understand the child’s story and background, gathers 
information from different sources about the child’s individual 
circumstances, and makes recommendations to decision 
makers about what is in the child’s best interests. 
Challenges. Child Advocates play an important role in the 
children’s cases to which they are assigned; however, they 
are provided for only a small percentage of unaccompanied 
children. This contrasts with the federal government’s 
requirement in the domestic child welfare context that the 
states provide guardians ad litem for all children in abuse 
and neglect proceedings, as a prerequisite to certain federal 
funding.
57
At the end of FY 2014, ORR expanded funding 
for Child Advocate services, but these services are still only 
provided to a small portion of cases and only in a handful 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested