convert pdf to tiff c# open source : Change security settings pdf SDK software service wpf winforms web page dnn mathinsociety13-part770

Graph Theory   127 
Step 3 & 4 (#4):  Mark Chicago as visited and Atlanta as current. 
Step 2 (#5):  The distance from Atlanta to Baltimore is 14.  Adding that to the distance 
already calculated for Atlanta gives a total distance of 14+40 = 54 hours from Baltimore to 
Bakersfield through Atlanta.  Since this is larger than the currently calculated distance, we do 
not replace the distance for Baltimore. 
Step 3 & 4 (#5):  We mark Atlanta as visited.  All cities have been visited and we are done.   
The shortest route from Baltimore to Bakersfield will take 52 hours, and will route through 
Chicago and Denver. 
Try it Now 2 
Find the shortest path between vertices A and G in the graph below. 
Euler Circuits and the Chinese Postman Problem 
In the first section, we created a graph of the Königsberg bridges and asked whether it was 
possible to walk across every bridge once.  Because Euler first studied this question, these 
types of paths are named after him. 
Euler Path 
An Euler path is a path that uses every edge in a graph with no repeats.  Being a path, 
it does not have to return to the starting vertex. 
Baltimore 
[52] 
Denver 
[19] 
Dallas 
[25] 
Chicago 
[37] 
Atlanta 
[40] 
Bakersfield 
[0] 
Baltimore 
15 
14 
Denver 
18 
24 
19 
Dallas 
18 
15 
25 
Chicago 
15 
18 
18 
14 
Atlanta 
14 
24 
15 
14 
Bakersfield 
19 
25 
Change security settings pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf security remover; creating a secure pdf document
Change security settings pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt pdf file online; pdf secure signature
128 
Example 5 
In the graph shown below, there are several Euler paths.  One such path is CABDCB.  The 
path is shown in arrows to the right, with the order of edges numbered. 
Euler Circuit 
An Euler circuit is a circuit that uses every edge in a graph with no repeats.  Being a 
circuit, it must start and end at the same vertex. 
Example 6 
The graph below has several possible Euler circuits.  Here’s a couple, starting and ending at 
vertex A:  ADEACEFCBA and AECABCFEDA.  The second is shown in arrows. 
Look back at the example used for Euler paths – does that graph have an Euler circuit?  A 
few tries will tell you no; that graph does not have an Euler circuit.  When we were working 
with shortest paths, we were interested in the optimal path.  With Euler paths and circuits, 
we’re primarily interested in whether an Euler path or circuit exists.   
Why do we care if an Euler circuit exists?  Think back to our housing development lawn 
inspector from the beginning of the chapter.  The lawn inspector is interested in walking as 
little as possible.  The ideal situation would be a circuit that covers every street with no 
repeats.  That’s an Euler circuit!  Luckily, Euler solved the question of whether or not an 
Euler path or circuit will exist. 
Euler’s Path and Circuit Theorems 
A graph will contain an Euler path if it contains at most two vertices of odd degree. 
A graph will contain an Euler circuit if all vertices have even degree 
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
easy as possible to change your PDF file permission settings. You can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security.
change security on pdf; cannot print pdf security
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK provides some PDF security settings about password to help protect your PDF document Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password.
copy from locked pdf; create secure pdf online
Graph Theory   129 
Example 7 
In the graph below, vertices A and C have degree 4, since there are 4 edges leading into each 
vertex.  B is degree 2, D is degree 3, and E is degree 1.  This graph contains two vertices with 
odd degree (D and E) and three vertices with even degree (A, B, and C), so Euler’s theorems 
tell us this graph has an Euler path, but not an Euler circuit. 
Example 8 
Is there an Euler circuit on the housing development lawn inspector graph we created earlier 
in the chapter?  All the highlighted vertices have odd degree.  Since there are more than two 
vertices with odd degree, there are no Euler paths or Euler circuits on this graph.  
Unfortunately our lawn inspector will need to do some backtracking. 
Example 9 
When it snows in the same housing development, the snowplow has to plow both sides of 
every street.  For simplicity, we’ll assume the plow is out early enough that it can ignore 
traffic laws and drive down either side of the street in either direction.  This can be visualized 
in the graph by drawing two edges for each street, representing the two sides of the street. 
Notice that every vertex in this graph has even degree, so this graph does have an Euler 
circuit.   
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
copy paste encrypted pdf; pdf password security
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
You can use our .NET PDF SDK to set file split settings for your PDF You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are good to Web Security.
can print pdf security; pdf unlock
130 
Now we know how to determine if a graph has an Euler circuit, but if it does, how do we find 
one?  While it usually is possible to find an Euler circuit just by pulling out your pencil and 
trying to find one, the more formal method is Fleury’s algorithm. 
Fleury’s Algorithm 
1.  Start at any vertex if finding an Euler circuit.  If finding an Euler path, start at one 
of the two vertices with odd degree. 
2.  Choose any edge leaving your current vertex, provided deleting that edge will not 
separate the graph into two disconnected sets of edges. 
3.  Add that edge to your circuit, and delete it from the graph. 
4.  Continue until you’re done. 
Example 10 
Let’s find an Euler Circuit on this graph using Fleury’s algorithm, starting at vertex A. 
Try it Now 3 
Does the graph below have an Euler Circuit?  If so, find one. 
Original Graph.   
Choosing edge AD. 
Circuit so far: AD 
AD deleted.  D is current. 
Can’t choose DC since that 
would disconnect graph. 
Choosing DE 
Circuit so far: ADE 
E is current. 
From here, there is only one 
option, so the rest of the 
circuit is determined. 
Circuit: ADEBDCA 
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
pdf password encryption; add security to pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Document Protection. XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. Password, digital
copy text from locked pdf; change pdf security settings
Graph Theory   131 
Eulerization and the Chinese Postman Problem 
Not every graph has an Euler path or circuit, yet our lawn inspector still needs to do her 
inspections.  Her goal is to minimize the amount of walking she has to do.  In order to do 
that, she will have to duplicate some edges in the graph until an Euler circuit exists.  
Eulerization 
Eulerization is the process of adding edges to a graph to create an Euler circuit on a 
graph.  To eulerize a graph, edges are duplicated to connect pairs of vertices with odd 
degree.  Connecting two odd degree vertices increases the degree of each, giving them 
both even degree.  When two odd degree vertices are not directly connected, we can 
duplicate all edges in a path connecting the two. 
Note that we can only duplicate edges, not create edges where there wasn’t one before.  
Duplicating edges would mean walking or driving down a road twice, while creating an edge 
where there wasn’t one before is akin to installing a new road! 
Example 11 
For the rectangular graph shown, three possible eulerizations are shown.  Notice in each of 
these cases the vertices that started with odd degrees have even degrees after eulerization, 
allowing for an Euler circuit. 
In the example above, you’ll notice that the last eulerization required duplicating seven 
edges, while the first two only required duplicating five edges.  If we were eulerizing the 
graph to find a walking path, we would want the eulerization with minimal duplications.  If 
the edges had weights representing distances or costs, then we would want to select the 
eulerization with the minimal total added weight. 
Try it Now 4 
Eulerize the graph shown, then find an Euler circuit 
on the eulerized graph. 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
change security settings on pdf; change security settings pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
decrypt pdf file; create pdf security
132 
Example 12 
Looking again at the graph for our lawn inspector from Examples 1 and 8, the vertices with 
odd degree are shown highlighted.  With eight vertices, we will always have to duplicate at 
least four edges.  In this case, we need to duplicate five edges since two odd degree vertices 
are not directly connected.  Without weights we can’t be certain this is the eulerization that 
minimizes walking distance, but it looks pretty good. 
The problem of finding the optimal eulerization is called the Chinese Postman Problem, a 
name given by an American in honor of the Chinese mathematician Mei-Ko Kwan who first 
studied the problem in 1962 while trying to find optimal delivery routes for postal carriers.   
This problem is important in determining efficient routes for garbage trucks, school buses, 
parking meter checkers, street sweepers, and more. 
Unfortunately, algorithms to solve this problem are fairly complex.  Some simpler cases are 
considered in the exercises. 
Hamiltonian Circuits and the Traveling Salesman Problem 
In the last section, we considered optimizing a walking route for a postal carrier.  How is this 
different than the requirements of a package delivery driver?  While the postal carrier needed 
to walk down every street (edge) to deliver the mail, the package delivery driver instead 
needs to visit every one of a set of delivery locations.  Instead of looking for a circuit that 
covers every edge once, the package deliverer is interested in a circuit that visits every vertex 
once. 
Hamiltonian Circuits and Paths 
A Hamiltonian circuit is a circuit that visits every vertex once with no repeats.  Being 
a circuit, it must start and end at the same vertex.  A Hamiltonian path also visits 
every vertex once with no repeats, but does not have to start and end at the same 
vertex.   
Hamiltonian circuits are named for William Rowan Hamilton who studied them in the 
1800’s. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
the conversion settings you like, and download it with one click. The entire process is quick, free and very easy. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will
copy locked pdf; creating secure pdf files
Graph Theory   133 
Example 13 
One Hamiltonian circuit is shown on the graph below.  There are several other Hamiltonian 
circuits possible on this graph.  Notice that the circuit only has to visit every vertex once; it 
does not need to use every edge.   
This circuit could be notated by the sequence of vertices visited, starting and ending at the 
same vertex: ABFGCDHMLKJEA.  Notice that the same circuit could be written in reverse 
order, or starting and ending at a different vertex. 
Unlike with Euler circuits, there is no nice theorem that allows us to instantly determine 
whether or not a Hamiltonian circuit exists for all graphs.
4
Example 14 
Does a Hamiltonian path or circuit exist on the graph below? 
We can see that once we travel to vertex E there is no way to leave without returning to C, so 
there is no possibility of a Hamiltonian circuit.  If we start at vertex E we can find several 
Hamiltonian paths, such as ECDAB and ECABD. 
With Hamiltonian circuits, our focus will not be on existence, but on the question of 
optimization; given a graph where the edges have weights, can we find the optimal 
Hamiltonian circuit; the one with lowest total weight. 
This problem is called the Traveling 
salesman problem (TSP) because the 
question can be framed like this:  Suppose a 
salesman needs to give sales pitches in four 
cities.  He looks up the airfares between each 
city, and puts the costs in a graph.  In what 
order should he travel to visit each city once 
then return home with the lowest cost?  
4
There are some theorems that can be used in specific circumstances, such as Dirac’s theorem, which says that 
a Hamiltonian circuit must exist on a graph with n vertices if each vertex has degree n/2 or greater. 
Home (Seattle) 
LA 
Chicago 
Dallas 
Atlanta 
$165 
$150 
$120 
$85 
$75 
$100 
$70 
$145 
$140 
$170 
134 
To answer this question of how to find the lowest cost Hamiltonian circuit, we will consider 
some possible approaches.  The first option that might come to mind is to just try all different 
possible circuits. 
Brute Force Algorithm (a.k.a. exhaustive search) 
1.  List all possible Hamiltonian circuits 
2.  Find the length of each circuit by adding the edge weights 
3.  Select the circuit with minimal total weight. 
Example 15 
Apply the Brute force algorithm to find the minimum cost Hamiltonian circuit on the graph 
below. 
To apply the Brute force algorithm, we list all possible Hamiltonian circuits and calculate 
their weight: 
Note:  These are the unique circuits on this graph.  All other possible circuits are the reverse 
of the listed ones or start at a different vertex, but result in the same weights. 
From this we can see that the second circuit, ABDCA, is the optimal circuit.   
The Brute force algorithm is optimal; it will always produce the Hamiltonian circuit with 
minimum weight.  Is it efficient?  To answer that question, we need to consider how many 
Hamiltonian circuits a graph could have.  For simplicity, let’s look at the worst-case 
possibility, where every vertex is connected to every other vertex.  This is called a complete 
graph. 
Suppose we had a complete graph with five vertices like the air travel graph above.  From 
Seattle there are four cities we can visit first.  From each of those, there are three choices.  
From each of those cities, there are two possible cities to visit next.  There is then only one 
choice for the last city before returning home.   
Circuit 
Weight 
ABCDA 
4+13+8+1 = 26 
ABDCA 
4+9+8+2 = 23 
ACBDA 
2+13+9+1 = 25 
13 
Graph Theory   135 
This can be shown visually: 
Counting the number of routes, we can see there are 4 3 2 1 24
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ =
routes.  For six cities there 
would be 5 4 4 3 21 1 120
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ =
routes.   
Number of Possible Circuits 
For N vertices in a complete graph, there will be ( 1)! ( 1)( 2)( 3) 3 2 1
n
n
n
n
=
⋅ ⋅
routes.  Half of these are duplicates in reverse order, so there are 
2
( n−1)!
unique 
circuits. 
The exclamation symbol, !,  is read “factorial” and is shorthand for the product shown. 
Example 16 
How many circuits would a complete graph with 8 vertices have? 
A complete graph with 8 vertices would have 
(8 1)! 7! 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
=
= ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅
= 5040 possible 
Hamiltonian circuits.  Half of the circuits are duplicates of other circuits but in reverse order, 
leaving 2520 unique routes.   
While this is a lot, it doesn’t seem unreasonably huge.  But consider what happens as the 
number of cities increase: 
Cities 
Unique Hamiltonian Circuits 
8!/2 = 20,160 
10 
9!/2 = 181,440 
11 
10!/2 = 1,814,400 
15 
14!/2 = 43,589,145,600 
600 
20 
19!/2 = 60,822,550,204,416,000 
6,000 
As you can see the number of circuits is growing extremely quickly.  If a computer looked at 
one billion circuits a second, it would still take almost two years to examine all the possible 
circuits with only 20 cities!  Certainly Brute Force is not an efficient algorithm.   
Home (Seattle) 
LA 
Chicago 
Dallas 
Atlanta 
 A 
 A 
 D 
 A 
 A 
 L 
 A 
 A 
 D 
 L 
 L 
 D 
136 
Unfortunately, no one has yet found an efficient and optimal algorithm to solve the TSP, and 
it is very unlikely anyone ever will.  Since it is not practical to use brute force to solve the 
problem, we turn instead to heuristic algorithms; efficient algorithms that give approximate 
solutions.  In other words, heuristic algorithms are fast, but may or may not produce the 
optimal circuit. 
Nearest Neighbor Algorithm (NNA) 
1.  Select a starting point. 
2.  Move to the nearest unvisited vertex (the edge with smallest weight). 
3.  Repeat until the circuit is complete. 
Example 17 
Consider our earlier graph, shown to the right.   
Starting at vertex A, the nearest neighbor is vertex D with a weight of 1. 
From D, the nearest neighbor is C, with a weight of 8.   
From C, our only option is to move to vertex B, the only unvisited vertex, 
with a cost of 13.   
From B we return to A with a weight of 4.   
The resulting circuit is ADCBA with a total weight of 1+8+13+4 = 26. 
We ended up finding the worst circuit in the graph!  What happened?  Unfortunately, while it 
is very easy to implement, the NNA is a greedy algorithm, meaning it only looks at the 
immediate decision without considering the consequences in the future.  In this case, 
following the edge AD forced us to use the very expensive edge BC later. 
Example 18 
Consider again our salesman.  Starting in Seattle, 
the nearest neighbor (cheapest flight) is to LA, at 
a cost of $70.  From there: 
LA to Chicago:  $100 
Chicago to Atlanta: $75 
Atlanta to Dallas: $85 
Dallas to Seattle: $120 
Total cost: $450 
In this case, nearest neighbor did find the optimal circuit.   
Going back to our first example, how could we improve the outcome?  One option would be 
to redo the nearest neighbor algorithm with a different starting point to see if the result 
changed.  Since nearest neighbor is so fast, doing it several times isn’t a big deal. 
13 
Home (Seattle) 
LA 
Chicago 
Dallas 
Atlanta 
$165 
$150 
$120 
$85 
$75 
$100 
$70 
$145 
$140 
$170 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested