convert pdf to tiff c# open source : Copy paste encrypted pdf software SDK dll windows winforms html web forms mathinsociety28-part786

Describing Data   277 
10. Refer back to the histogram from question #4. 
a.  Compute the mean number of shipping days 
b.  Compute the median number of shipping days 
c.  Write the 5-number summary for this data. 
d.  Create box plot. 
Concepts 
11. The box plot below shows salaries for Actuaries and CPAs. Kendra makes the median 
salary for an Actuary. Kelsey makes the first quartile salary for a CPA.  Who makes 
more money?  How much more? 
12. Referring to the boxplot above, what percentage of actuaries makes more than the 
median salary of a CPA? 
Exploration 
13. Studies are often done by pharmaceutical companies to determine the effectiveness of 
a treatment program. Suppose that a new AIDS antibody drug is currently under 
study. It is given to patients once the AIDS symptoms have revealed themselves. Of 
interest is the average length of time in months patients live once starting the 
treatment. Two researchers each follow a different set of 40 AIDS patients from the 
start of treatment until their deaths. The following data (in months) are collected. 
Researcher 1: 3; 4; 11; 15; 16; 17; 22; 44; 37; 16; 14; 24; 25; 15; 26; 27; 33; 29; 
35; 44; 13; 21; 22; 10; 12; 8; 40; 32; 26; 27; 31; 34; 29; 17; 8; 24; 18; 47; 33; 34 
Researcher 2: 3; 14; 11; 5; 16; 17; 28; 41; 31; 18; 14; 14; 26; 25; 21; 22; 31; 2; 35; 
44; 23; 21; 21; 16; 12; 18; 41; 22; 16; 25; 33; 34; 29; 13; 18; 24; 23; 42; 33; 29 
a.  Create comparative histograms of the data 
b.  Create comparative boxplots of the data 
Copy paste encrypted pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf password unlock; secure pdf
Copy paste encrypted pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
convert locked pdf to word doc; change security on pdf
278 
14. A graph appears below showing the number of adults and children who prefer each 
type of soda. There were 130 adults and kids surveyed. Discuss some ways in which 
the graph below could be improved 
20
25
30
35
40
45
Coke
Diet Coke
Sprite
Cherry
Coke
Kids
Adults
15. Make up three data sets with 5 numbers each that have:  
a.  the same mean but different standard deviations. 
b.  the same mean but different medians. 
c.  the same median but different means. 
16. A sample of 30 distance scores measured in yards has a mean of 7, a variance of 16, 
and a standard deviation of 4.  
a.  You want to convert all your distances from yards to feet, so you multiply 
each score in the sample by 3. What are the new mean, median, variance, and 
standard deviation?  
b.  You then decide that you only want to look at the distance past a certain point. 
Thus, after multiplying the original scores by 3, you decide to subtract 4 feet 
from each of the scores. Now what are the new mean, median, variance, and 
standard deviation? 
17. In your class, design a poll on a topic of interest to you and give it to the class.   
a.  Summarize the data, computing the mean and five-number summary. 
b.  Create a graphical representation of the data. 
c.  Write several sentences about the topic, using your computed statistics as 
evidence in your writing. 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsExtract = true; // Copy is allowed. In this part, you will know how to change and update password for an encrypted PDF file in C# programming
copy text from encrypted pdf; convert locked pdf to word online
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsExtract = True ' Copy is allowed In this part, you will know how to change and update password for an encrypted PDF file in VB.NET programming
can print pdf security; pdf secure
Probability 279 
© David Lippman 
Creative Commons BY-SA 
Probability 
Introduction 
The probability of a specified event is the chance or likelihood that it will occur.  There are 
several ways of viewing probability.  One would be experimental in nature, where we 
repeatedly conduct an experiment.  Suppose we flipped a coin over and over and over again 
and it came up heads about half of the time; we would expect that in the future whenever we 
flipped the coin it would turn up heads about half of the time.  When a weather reporter says 
“there is a 10% chance of rain tomorrow,” she is basing that on prior evidence; that out of all 
days with similar weather patterns, it has rained on 1 out of 10 of those days. 
Another view would be subjective in nature, in other words an educated guess.  If someone 
asked you the probability that the Seattle Mariners would win their next baseball game, it 
would be impossible to conduct an experiment where the same two teams played each other 
repeatedly, each time with the same starting lineup and starting pitchers, each starting at the 
same time of day on the same field under the precisely the same conditions.  Since there are 
so many variables to take into account, someone familiar with baseball and with the two 
teams involved might make an educated guess that there is a 75% chance they will win the 
game; that is, if the same two teams were to play each other repeatedly under identical 
conditions, the Mariners would win about three out of every four games.  But this is just a 
guess, with no way to verify its accuracy, and depending upon how educated the educated 
guesser is, a subjective probability may not be worth very much. 
We will return to the experimental and subjective probabilities from time to time, but in this 
course we will mostly be concerned with theoretical probability, which is defined as 
follows: Suppose there is a situation with n equally likely possible outcomes and that m of 
those n outcomes correspond to a particular event; then the probability of that event is 
defined as 
n
m
Basic Concepts 
If you roll a die, pick a card from deck of playing cards, or randomly select a person and 
observe their hair color, we are executing an experiment or procedure.  In probability, we 
look at the likelihood of different outcomes.  We begin with some terminology.  
Events and Outcomes 
The result of an experiment is called an outcome.  
An event is any particular outcome or group of outcomes.  
A simple event is an event that cannot be broken down further 
The sample space is the set of all possible simple events.  
280 
Example 1 
If we roll a standard 6-sided die, describe the sample space and some simple events. 
The sample space is the set of all possible simple events: {1,2,3,4,5,6} 
Some examples of simple events: 
We roll a 1 
We roll a 5 
Some compound events: 
We roll a number bigger than 4 
We roll an even number 
Basic Probability 
Given that all outcomes are equally likely, we can compute the probability of an event 
E using this formula: 
outcomes
likely 
-
equally
of
number 
Total
E
event 
the
to
ing
correspond
outcomes
of
Number 
P( E)=
Example 2 
If we roll a 6-sided die, calculate 
a) P(rolling a 1) 
b) P(rolling a number bigger than 4) 
Recall that the sample space is {1,2,3,4,5,6} 
a) There is one outcome corresponding to “rolling a 1”, so the probability is 
6
1
b) There are two outcomes bigger than a 4, so the probability is 
3
1
6
2
 
Probabilities are essentially fractions, and can be reduced to lower terms like fractions. 
Example 3 
Let's say you have a bag with 20 cherries, 14 sweet and 6 sour. If you pick a cherry at 
random, what is the probability that it will be sweet?  
There are 20 possible cherries that could be picked, so the number of possible outcomes is 
20. Of these 20 possible outcomes, 14 are favorable (sweet), so the probability that the cherry 
will be sweet is 
10
7
20
14
=
.  
Two dice 
One die 
Probability   281 
There is one potential complication to this example, however. It must be assumed that the 
probability of picking any of the cherries is the same as the probability of picking any other. 
This wouldn't be true if (let us imagine) the sweet cherries are smaller than the sour ones. 
(The sour cherries would come to hand more readily when you sampled from the bag.) Let us 
keep in mind, therefore, that when we assess probabilities in terms of the ratio of favorable to 
all potential cases, we rely heavily on the assumption of equal probability for all outcomes. 
Try it Now 1 
At some random moment, you look at your clock and note the minutes reading. 
a. What is probability the minutes reading is 15? 
b. What is the probability the minutes reading is 15 or less? 
Cards 
A standard deck of 52 playing cards consists of four suits (hearts, spades, diamonds 
and clubs). Spades and clubs are black while hearts and diamonds are red. Each suit 
contains 13 cards, each of a different rank: an Ace (which in many games functions as 
both a low card and a high card), cards numbered 2 through 10, a Jack, a Queen and a 
King. 
Example 4 
Compute the probability of randomly drawing one card from a deck and getting an Ace. 
There are 52 cards in the deck and 4 Aces so 
0769
0.
13
1
52
4
)
(
=
=
Ace
P
We can also think of probabilities as percents: There is a 7.69% chance that a randomly 
selected card will be an Ace. 
Notice that the smallest possible probability is 0 – if there are no outcomes that correspond 
with the event.  The largest possible probability is 1 – if all possible outcomes correspond 
with the event. 
Certain and Impossible events 
An impossible event has a probability of 0. 
A certain event has a probability of 1. 
The probability of any event must be 
( ) ) 1
0
PE
In the course of this chapter, if you compute a probability and get an answer that is negative 
or greater than 1, you have made a mistake and should check your work. 
282 
Working with Events 
Complementary Events 
Now let us examine the probability that an event does not happen. As in the previous section, 
consider the situation of rolling a six-sided die and first compute the probability of rolling a 
six: the answer is P(six) =1/6. Now consider the probability that we do not roll a six: there 
are 5 outcomes that are not a six, so the answer is P(not a six) = 
6
5
. Notice that  
1
6
6
6
5
6
1
(not a six)
(six)
= + + = =
+P
P
This is not a coincidence.  Consider a generic situation with n possible outcomes and an 
event E that corresponds to m of these outcomes. Then the remaining n - m outcomes 
correspond to E not happening, thus 
( )
1
1
)
(not 
PE
n
m
n
m
n
n
n
n m
E
P
= −
= −
= −
=
Complement of an Event 
The complement of an event is the event “E doesn’t happen” 
The notation 
E is used for the complement of event E. 
We can compute the probability of the complement using 
( )
1
( )
P E
PE
= −
Notice also that 
( )
( ) 1
PE
P E
= −
Example 5 
If you pull a random card from a deck of playing cards, what is the probability it is not a 
heart? 
There are 13 hearts in the deck, so 
4
1
52
13
)
heart
(
=
=
P
The probability of not drawing a heart is the complement:  
4
3
4
1
) 1
heart
(
) 1
heart
(not 
= − − =
= −
P
P
Probability of two independent events 
Example 6 
Suppose we flipped a coin and rolled a die, and wanted to know the probability of getting a 
head on the coin and a 6 on the die.   
We could list all possible outcomes:   {H1,H2,H3,H4,H5,H6,T1,T2,T3,T4,T5,T6}.    
Probability   283 
Notice there are 2 · 6 = 12 total outcomes.  Out of these, only 1 is the desired outcome, so the 
probability is 
12
1
The prior example was looking at two independent events. 
Independent Events 
Events A and B are independent events if the probability of Event B occurring is the 
same whether or not Event A occurs.  
Example 7 
Are these events independent? 
a)  A fair coin is tossed two times.  The two events are (1) first toss is a head and (2) second 
toss is a head. 
b) The two events (1) "It will rain tomorrow in Houston" and (2) "It will rain tomorrow in 
Galveston” (a city near Houston). 
c) You draw a card from a deck, then draw a second card without replacing the first. 
a) The probability that a head comes up on the second toss is 1/2 regardless of whether or not 
a head came up on the first toss, so these events are independent.  
b) These events are not independent because it is more likely that it will rain in Galveston on 
days it rains in Houston than on days it does not. 
c) The probability of the second card being red depends on whether the first card is red or 
not, so these events are not independent. 
When two events are independent, the probability of both occurring is the product of the 
probabilities of the individual events.  
P(A and B) for independent events 
If events A and B are independent, then the probability of both A and B occurring is 
P(A and B) = P(A) · P(B) 
where P(A and B) is the probability of events A and B both occurring, P(A) is the 
probability of event A occurring, and P(B) is the probability of event B occurring 
If you look back at the coin and die example from earlier, you can see how the number of 
outcomes of the first event multiplied by the number of outcomes in the second event 
multiplied to equal the total number of possible outcomes in the combined event. 
284 
Example 8 
In your drawer you have 10 pairs of socks, 6 of which are white, and 7 tee shirts, 3 of which 
are white.  If you randomly reach in and pull out a pair of socks and a tee shirt, what is the 
probability both are white? 
The probability of choosing a white pair of socks is  
10
6
The probability of choosing a white tee shirt is 
7
3
The probability of both being white is 
35
9
70
18
7
3
10
6
=
⋅ =
Try it Now 2 
A card is pulled a deck of cards and noted.  The card is then replaced, the deck is shuffled, 
and a second card is removed and noted.  What is the probability that both cards are Aces?   
The previous examples looked at the probability of both events occurring.  Now we will look 
at the probability of either event occurring. 
Example 9 
Suppose we flipped a coin and rolled a die, and wanted to know the probability of getting a 
head on the coin or a 6 on the die.    
Here, there are still 12 possible outcomes: {H1,H2,H3,H4,H5,H6,T1,T2,T3,T4,T5,T6} 
By simply counting, we can see that 7 of the outcomes have a head on the coin or a 6 on the 
die or both – we use or inclusively here (these 7 outcomes are H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6, T6), 
so the probability is 
12
7
.  How could we have found this from the individual probabilities? 
As we would expect, 
2
1
of these outcomes have a head, and 
6
1
of these outcomes have a 6 
on the die.  If we add these, 
12
8
12
2
12
6
6
1
2
1
=
+
+ =
, which is not the correct probability.  
Looking at the outcomes we can see why:  the outcome H6 would have been counted twice, 
since it contains both a head and a 6; the probability of both a head and rolling a 6 is 
12
1
If we subtract out this double count, we have the correct probability: 
12
7
12
1
12
8
=
.   
Probability   285 
P(A or B) 
The probability of either A or B occurring (or both) is 
P(A or B) = P(A) + P(B)  –  P(A and B) 
Example 10 
Suppose we draw one card from a standard deck. What is the probability that we get a Queen 
or a King? 
There are 4 Queens and 4 Kings in the deck, hence 8 outcomes corresponding to a Queen or 
King out of 52 possible outcomes. Thus the probability of drawing a Queen or a King is:  
52
8
)
Queen
 or 
King
(
=
P
Note that in this case, there are no cards that are both a Queen and a King, so 
) 0
Queen
 and
King
(
=
P
.  Using our probability rule, we could have said: 
52
8
0
52
4
52
4
)
Queen
 and
King
(
)
Queen
(
)
King
(
)
Queen
 or 
King
(
− =
+
=
+
=
P
P
P
P
In the last example, the events were mutually exclusive, so P(A or B) = P(A) + P(B). 
Example 11 
Suppose we draw one card from a standard deck. What is the probability that we get a red 
card or a King? 
Half the cards are red, so 
52
26
(red)
=
P
There are four kings, so 
52
4
)
King
(
=
P
There are two red kings, so 
52
2
)
(Red and King
=
P
We can then calculate 
52
28
52
2
52
4
52
26
)
(Red and King
)
King
(
(Red)
)
King
(Red or 
=
+
=
+
=
P
P
P
P
Try it Now 3 
In your drawer you have 10 pairs of socks, 6 of which are white, and 7 tee shirts, 3 of which 
are white.  If you reach in and randomly grab a pair of socks and a tee shirt, what the 
probability at least one is white? 
286 
Example 12 
The table below shows the number of survey subjects who have received and not received a 
speeding ticket in the last year, and the color of their car.  Find the probability that a 
randomly chosen person: 
a) Has a red car and got a speeding ticket 
b) Has a red car or got a speeding ticket. 
We can see that 15 people of the 665 surveyed had both a red car and got a speeding ticket, 
so the probability is 
0.0226
665
15
Notice that having a red car and getting a speeding ticket are not independent events, so the 
probability of both of them occurring is not simply the product of probabilities of each one 
occurring. 
We could answer this question by simply adding up the numbers:  15 people with red cars 
and speeding tickets + 135 with red cars but no ticket + 45 with a ticket but no red car = 195 
people.  So the probability is 
0.2932
665
195
We also could have found this probability by: 
P(had a red car) + P(got a speeding ticket) – P(had a red car and got a speeding ticket)  
665
195
665
15
665
60
665
150
=
+
Conditional Probability 
Often it is required to compute the probability of an event given that another event has 
occurred.  
Example 13 
What is the probability that two cards drawn at random from a deck of playing cards will 
both be aces?  
It might seem that you could use the formula for the probability of two independent events 
and simply multiply 
169
1
52
4
52
4
=
. This would be incorrect, however, because the two 
events are not independent. If the first card drawn is an ace, then the probability that the 
second card is also an ace would be lower because there would only be three aces left in the 
deck. 
Speeding 
ticket 
No speeding 
ticket 
Total 
Red car 
15 
135 
150 
Not red car  45 
470 
515 
Total 
60 
605 
665 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested