convert pdf to tiff c# open source : Decrypt pdf password Library application component asp.net windows winforms mvc mathinsociety9-part807

Appportionment   87 
Lowndes’ Method 
William Lowndes (1782-1822) was a Congressman from South Carolina (a small state) who 
proposed a method of apportionment that was more favorable to smaller states.  Unlike the 
methods of Hamilton, Jefferson, and Webster, Lowndes’s method has never been used to 
apportion Congress. 
Lowndes believed that an additional representative was much more valuable to a small state 
than to a large one.  If a state already has 20 or 30 representatives, getting one more doesn’t 
matter very much.  But if it only has 2 or 3, one more is a big deal, and he felt that the 
additional representatives should go where they could make the most difference. 
Like Hamilton’s method, Lowndes’s method follows the quota rule.  In fact, it arrives at the 
same quotas as Hamilton and the rest, and like Hamilton and Jefferson, it drops the decimal 
parts.  But in deciding where the remaining representatives should go, we divide the decimal 
part of each state’s quota by the whole number part (so that the same decimal part with a 
smaller whole number is worth more, because it matters more to that state). 
Lowndes’s Method 
1.  Determine how many people each representative should represent.  Do this by 
dividing the total population of all the states by the total number of representatives.  
This answer is called the divisor. 
2.  Divide each state’s population by the divisor to determine how many 
representatives it should have.  Record this answer to several decimal places.  This 
answer is called the quota. 
3.  Cut off all the decimal parts of all the quotas (but don’t forget what the decimals 
were).  Add up the remaining whole numbers.   
4.  Assuming that the total from Step 3 was less than the total number of 
representatives, divide the decimal part of each state’s quota by the whole number 
part.  Assign the remaining representatives, one each, to the states whose ratio of 
decimal part to whole part were largest, until the desired total is reached. 
Example 10 
We’ll do Delaware again.  We begin in the same way as with Hamilton’s method: 
County  
Population  Quota   
Initial 
Kent   
162,310 
7.4111 
New Castle     538,479 
24.5872 
24 
Sussex  
197,145 
9.0017 
Total   
897,934 
40 
Decrypt pdf password - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
copy paste encrypted pdf; pdf password security
Decrypt pdf password - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
create encrypted pdf; decrypt pdf online
88 
We need one more representative.  To find out which county should get it, Lowndes says to 
divide each county’s decimal part by its whole number part, with the largest result getting the 
extra representative: 
Kent:   
0.4111/7 ≈ 0.0587 
New Castle:  0.5872/24 ≈ 0.0245 
Sussex: 
0.0017/9 ≈ 0.0002 
The largest of these is Kent’s, so Kent gets the 41
st
representative: 
County  
Population  Quota   
Initial  Ratio   
Final 
Kent   
162,310 
7.4111 
7  0.0587  
New Castle     538,479 
24.5872 
24  0.0245  
24 
Sussex  
197,145 
9.0017 
9  0.0002  
Total   
897,934 
40   
41 
Example 11 
Rhode Island, again beginning in the same way as Hamilton: 
County   
Population  Quota   
Initial 
Bristol   
49,875 
3.5538 
Kent   
166,158 
11.8395 
11 
Newport             82,888 
5.9061 
Providence 
626,667 
44.6528 
44 
Washington     126,979 
9.0478 
Total   
1,052,567 
72 
We divide each county’s quota’s decimal part by its whole number part to determine which 
three should get the remaining representatives: 
Bristol: 
0.5538/3 ≈  0.1846 
Kent:   
0.8395/11 ≈  0.0763 
Newport: 
0.9061/5 ≈  0.1812 
Providence:  0.6528/44 ≈  0.0148 
Washington:  0.0478/9 ≈  0.0053 
The three largest of these are Bristol, Newport, and Kent, so they get the remaining three 
representatives: 
County   
Population  Quota   
Initial  Ratio   
Final 
Bristol   
49,875 
3.5538 
3    0.1846 
Kent   
166,158 
11.8395 
11    0.0763 
12 
Newport             82,888 
5.9061 
5    0.1812 
Providence 
626,667 
44.6528 
44    0.0148 
44 
Washington     126,979 
9.0478 
9    0.0053 
Total   
1,052,567 
72   
75 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
code in .NET class. Allow to decrypt PDF password and open a password protected document in C#.NET framework. Support to add password
creating a secure pdf document; change pdf document security properties
Appportionment   89 
As you can see, there is no “right answer” when it comes to choosing a method for 
apportionment.  Each method has its virtues, and favors different sized states. 
Apportionment of Legislative Districts 
In most states, there are a fixed number of representatives to the state legislature.  Rather than 
apportioning each county a number of representatives, legislative districts are drawn so that 
each legislator represents a district.  The apportionment process, then, comes in the drawing 
of the legislative districts, with the goal of having each district include approximately the 
same number of constituents.  Because of this goal, a geographically small city may have 
several representatives, while a large rural region may be represented by one legislator. 
When populations change, it becomes necessary to redistrict the regions each legislator 
represents (Incidentally, this also occurs for the regions that federal legislators represent).  
The process of redistricting is typically done by the legislature itself, so not surprisingly it is 
common to see gerrymandering. 
Gerrymandering 
Gerrymandering is when districts are drawn based on the political affiliation of the 
constituents to the advantage of those drawing the boundary.   
Example 12 
Consider three districts, simplified to the three boxes below.  On the left there is a college 
area that typically votes Democratic.  On the right is a rural area that typically votes 
Republican.  The rest of the people are more evenly split.  The middle district has been 
voting 50% Democratic and 50% Republican.   
As part of a redistricting, a Democratic led committee could redraw the boundaries so that 
the middle district includes less of the typically Republican voters, thereby making it more 
likely that their party will win in that district, while increasing the Republican majority in the 
third district. 
College 
Rural 
College 
Rural 
90 
Example 13 
The map to the right shows the 38
th
congressional district in California in 
2004
1
.  This district was created through 
a bi-partisan committee of incumbent 
legislators.  This gerrymandering leads 
to districts that are not competitive; the 
prevailing party almost always wins with 
a large margin. 
The map to the right shows the 4
th
congressional district in Illinois in 2004.
2
This district was drawn to contain the two 
predominantly Hispanic areas of Chicago.  
The largely Puerto Rican area to the north 
and the southern Mexican areas are only 
connected in this districting by a piece of 
the highway to the west. 
1
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:California_District_38_2004.png 
2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Illinois_District_4_2004.png 
Appportionment   91 
Exercises 
In exercises 1-8, determine the apportionment using 
a.  Hamilton’s Method 
b.  Jefferson’s Method 
c.  Webster’s Method 
d.  Huntington-Hill Method 
e.  Lowndes’ method 
1.  A college offers tutoring in Math, English, Chemistry, and Biology.  The number of 
students enrolled in each subject is listed below.  If the college can only afford to hire 15 
tutors, determine how many tutors should be assigned to each subject. 
Math:  330  English:  265  Chemistry:  130 
Biology: 70 
2.  Reapportion the previous problem if the college can hire 20 tutors. 
3.  The number of salespeople assigned to work during a shift is apportioned based on the 
average number of customers during that shift.  Apportion 20 salespeople given the 
information below. 
Shift 
Morning  Midday  Afternoon  Evening 
ning 
Average number of 
customers 
95 
305 
435 
515 
4.  Reapportion the previous problem if the store has 25 salespeople. 
5.  Three people invest in a treasure dive, each investing the amount listed below.  The dive 
results in 36 gold coins.  Apportion those coins to the investors. 
Alice: $7,600   
Ben: $5,900   
Carlos: $1,400 
6.  Reapportion the previous problem if 37 gold coins are recovered. 
7.  A small country consists of five states, whose populations are listed below.  If the 
legislature has 119 seats, apportion the seats. 
A: 810,000  B: 473,000  C: 292,000  D: 594,000  E: 211,000 
8.  A small country consists of six states, whose populations are listed below.  If the 
legislature has 200 seats, apportion the seats. 
A: 3,411 
B: 2,421 
C: 11,586 
D: 4,494 
E: 3,126 
F: 4,962 
9.  A small country consists of three states, whose populations are listed below. 
A:  6,000 
B: 6,000 
C: 2,000 
a.  If the legislature has 10 seats, use Hamilton’s method to apportion the seats. 
b.  If the legislature grows to 11 seats, use Hamilton’s method to apportion the seats. 
c.  Which apportionment paradox does this illustrate? 
92 
10. A state with five counties has 50 seats in their legislature.  Using Hamilton’s method, 
apportion the seats based on the 2000 census, then again using the 2010 census.  Which 
apportionment paradox does this illustrate? 
County 
2000 Population  2010 Population 
Jefferson 
60,000 
60,000 
Clay 
31,200 
31,200 
Madison 
69,200 
72,400 
Jackson 
81,600 
81,600 
Franklin 
118,000 
118,400 
11. A school district has two high schools:  Lowell, serving 1715 students, and Fairview, 
serving 7364. The district could only afford to hire 13 guidance counselors.   
a.  Determine how many counselors should be assigned to each school using Hamilton's 
method. 
b.  The following year, the district expands to include a third school, serving 2989 
students.  Based on the divisor from above, how many additional counselors should 
be hired for the new school? 
c.  After hiring that many new counselors, the district recalculates the reapportion using 
Hamilton's method.  Determine the outcome. 
d.  Does this situation illustrate any apportionment issues? 
12. A small country consists of four states, whose populations are listed below.  If the 
legislature has 116 seats, apportion the seats using Hamilton’s method.  Does this 
illustrate any apportionment issues? 
A: 33,700 
B: 559,500  C: 141,300  D: 89,100 
Exploration 
13. Explore and describe the similarities, differences, and interplay between weighted voting, 
fair division (if you’ve studied it yet), and apportionment. 
14. In the methods discussed in the text, it was assumed that the number of seats being 
apportioned was fixed.  Suppose instead that the number of seats could be adjusted 
slightly, perhaps 10% up or down.  Create a method for apportioning that incorporates 
this additional freedom, and describe why you feel it is the best approach.  Apply your 
method to the apportionment in Exercise 7. 
15. Lowndes felt that small states deserved additional seats more than larger states.  Suppose 
you were a legislator from a larger state, and write an argument refuting Lowndes. 
16. Research how apportionment of legislative seats is done in other countries around the 
world.  What are the similarities and differences compared to how the United States 
apportions congress? 
17. Adams’s method is similar to Jefferson’s method, but rounds quotas up rather than down.  
This means we usually need a modified divisor that is smaller than the standard divisor.  
Rework problems 1-8 using Adam’s method.  Which other method are the results most 
similar to? 
Fair Division   93 
© David Lippman 
Creative Commons BY-SA 
Fair Division 
Whether it is two kids sharing a candy bar or a couple splitting assets during a divorce, there 
are times in life where items of value need to be divided between two or more parties. While 
some cases can be handled through mutual agreement or mediation, in others the parties are 
adversarial or cannot reach a decision all feel is fair.  In these cases, fair division methods 
can be utilized. 
Fair Division Method 
A fair division method is a procedure that can be followed that will result in a division 
of items in a way so that each party feels they have received their fair share.  For these 
methods to work, we have to make a few assumptions: 
•  The parties are non-cooperative, so the method must operate without 
communication between the parties. 
•  The parties have no knowledge of what the other players like (their valuations). 
•  The parties act rationally, meaning they act in their best interest, and do not make 
emotional decisions. 
•  The method should allow the parties to make a fair division without requiring an 
outside arbitrator or other intervention. 
With these methods, each party will be entitled to some fair share.  When there are N parties 
equally dividing something, that fair share would be 1/N.   For example, if there were 4 
parties, each would be entitled to a fair share of ¼ = 25% of the whole.  More specifically, 
they are entitled to a share that they value as 25% of the whole.   
Fair Share 
When N parties divide something equally, each party’s fair share is the amount they 
entitled to.  As a fraction, it will be 1/N 
It should be noted that a fair division method simply needs to guarantee that each party will 
receive a share they view as fair.  A basic fair division does not need to be envy free; an 
envy-free division is one in which no party would prefer another party’s share over their 
own.   A basic fair division also does not need to be Pareto optimal; a Pareto optimal 
division is one in which no other division would make a participant better off without making 
someone else worse off.  Nor does fair division have to be equitable; an equitable division is 
one in which the proportion of the whole each party receives, judged by their own valuation, 
is the same.  Basically, a simple fair division doesn’t have to be the best possible division – it 
just has to give each party their fair share. 
Example 1 
Suppose that 4 classmates are splitting equally a $12 pizza that is half pepperoni, half veggie 
that someone else bought them.  What is each person’s fair share? 
Since they all are splitting the pizza equally, each person’s fair share is $3, or pieces they 
value as 25% of the pizza. 
94 
It is important to keep in mind that each party might value portions of the whole differently.  
For example, a vegetarian would probably put zero value on the pepperoni half of the pizza. 
Example 2 
Suppose that 4 classmates are splitting equally a $12 pizza that is half pepperoni, half veggie.  
Steve likes pepperoni twice as much as veggie.  Describe a fair share for Steve. 
He would value the veggie half as being worth $4 and the pepperoni half as $8, twice as 
much.  If the pizza was divided up into 4 pepperoni slices and 4 veggie slices, he would value 
a pepperoni slice as being worth $2, and a veggie slice as being worth $1.   
If we weren’t able to guess the values, we could take a more algebraic approach.  If Steve 
values a veggie slice as worth x dollars, then he’d value a pepperoni slice as worth 2x dollars 
– twice as much.  Four veggie slices would be worth 4·x = 4x dollars, and 4 pepperoni slices 
would be worth 4·2x = 8x dollars.  Altogether, the eight slices would be worth 4x + 8x = 12x 
dollars.  Since the total value of the pizza was $12, then 12x = $12.  Solving we get x = $1; 
the value of a veggie slice is $1, and the value of a pepperoni slice is 2x = $2. 
A fair share for Steve would be one pepperoni slice and one veggie slice ($2 + $1 = $3 
value), 1½ pepperoni slices (1½ · $2 = $3 value), 3 veggie slices (3 · $1 = $3 value), or a 
variety of more complicated possibilities. 
Try it Now 1 
Suppose Kim is another classmate splitting the pizza, but Kim is vegetarian, so won’t eat 
pepperoni.  Describe a fair share for Kim. 
You will find that many examples and exercises in this topic involve dividing food – dividing 
candy, cutting cakes, sharing pizza, etc.  This may make this topic seem somewhat trivial, but 
instead of cutting a cake, we might be drawing borders dividing Germany after WWII.  
Instead of splitting a bag of candy, siblings might be dividing belongings from an 
inheritance.  Mathematicians often characterize very important and contentious issues in 
terms of simple items like cake to separate any emotional influences from the mathematical 
method. 
Because of this, our requirement that the players not communicate about their preferences 
can seem silly.  After all, why wouldn’t four classmates talk about what kind of pizza they 
like if they’re splitting a pizza?  Just remember that in issues of politics, business, finance, 
divorce settlements, etc. the players are usually less cooperative and more concerned about 
the other players trying to get more than their fair share. 
Fair Division   95 
There are two broad classifications of fair division methods:  those that apply to 
continuously divisible items, and those that apply to discretely divisible items.   
Continuously divisible items are things that can be divided into pieces of any size, like 
dividing a candy bar into two pieces or drawing borders to split a piece of land into smaller 
plots.  Discretely divisible items are when you are dividing several items that cannot be 
broken apart easily, such as assets in a divorce (house, car, furniture, etc). 
Divider-Chooser 
The first method we will look at is a method for continuously divisible items.  This method 
will be familiar to many parents - it is the “You cut, I choose” method.  In this method, one 
party is designated the divider and the other the chooser, perhaps with a coin toss.  The 
method works as follows: 
Divider-Chooser Method 
1.  The divider cuts the item into two pieces that are, in his eyes, equal in value. 
2.  The chooser selects either of the two pieces 
3.  The divider receives the remaining piece 
Notice that the divider-chooser method is specific to a two-party division.  Examine why this 
method guarantees a fair division: since the divider doesn’t know which piece he will 
receive, the rational action for him to take would be to divide the whole into two pieces he 
values equally.  There is no incentive for the divider to attempt to “cheat” since he doesn’t 
know which piece he will receive.  Since the chooser can pick either piece, she is guaranteed 
that one of them is worth at least 50% of the whole in her eyes.  The chooser is guaranteed a 
piece she values as at least 50%, and the divider is guaranteed a piece he values at 50%. 
Example 3 
Two retirees, Fred and Martha, buy a vacation beach house in Florida together, with the 
agreement that they will split the year into two parts.   
Fred is chosen to be the divider, and splits the year into two pieces:  November – February 
and March – October.  Even though the first piece is 4 months and the second is 8 months, 
Fred places equal value on both pieces since he really likes to be in Florida during the winter.  
Martha gets to pick whichever piece she values more.  Suppose she values all months 
equally.  In this case, she would choose the March – October time, resulting in a piece that 
she values as 8/12 = 66.7% of the whole.  Fred is left with the November – February slot 
which he values as 50% of the whole. 
Of course, in this example, Fred and Martha probably could have discussed their preferences 
and reached a mutually agreeable decision.  The divider-chooser method is more necessary in 
cases where the parties are suspicious of each other’s motives, or are unable to communicate 
effectively, such as two countries drawing a border, or two children splitting a candy bar. 
96 
Try it Now 2 
Dustin and Quinn were given an apple pie and a chocolate cake, and need to divide them.  
Dustin values the apple pie at $6 and the chocolate cake at $4.  Quinn values the apple pie as 
$4 and the chocolate cake at $10.  Describe a fair division if Quinn is dividing, and specify 
which “half” Dustin will choose. 
Things quickly become more complicated when we have more than two parties involved.  
We will look at three different approaches.  But first, let us look at one that doesn’t work. 
How not to divide with 3 parties 
When first approaching the question of 3-party fair division, it is very tempting to propose 
this method:  Randomly designate one participant to be the divider, and designate the rest 
choosers.  Proceed as follows: 
1)  Have the divider divide the item into 3 pieces 
2)  Have the first chooser select any of the three pieces they feel is worth a fair share 
3)  Have the second chooser select either of the remaining pieces 
4)  The divider gets the piece left. 
Example 4.  Don’t do this – it is bad! 
Suppose we have three people splitting a cake.  We can immediately see that the divider will 
receive a fair share as long as they cut the cake fairly at the beginning.  The first chooser 
certainly will also receive a fair share.  What about the second chooser?  Suppose each 
person values the three pieces like this: 
Since the first chooser will clearly select Piece 1, the second chooser is left to select between 
Piece 2 and Piece 3, neither of which she values as a fair share (1/3 or about 33.3%).  This 
example shows that this method does not guarantee a fair division. 
To handle division with 3 or more parties, we’ll have to take a more clever approach. 
Lone Divider 
The lone divider method works for any number of parties – we will use N for the number of 
parties.  One participant is randomly designated the divider, and the rest of the participants 
are designated as choosers.   
Piece 1  Piece 2  Piece 3 
Chooser 1 
40% 
30% 
30% 
Chooser 2 
45% 
30% 
25% 
Divider 
33.3% 
33.3% 
33.3% 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested