convert pdf to tiff c# open source : Add security to pdf in reader SDK application API wpf html azure sharepoint Microsoft%20Word%202007%20for%20Dummies11-part818

The Paste Special dialog box lists options for pasting text, graphics, or what-
ever was last copied or cut; the number of options depends on what’s waiting
to be pasted. For example, you can copy a chunk of an Excel spreadsheet and
paste it into your Word document as a spreadsheet, table, picture, text, or
what-have-you.
I often use Paste Special to paste in text from a Web page but without all the
HTML-blah-blah formatting. I choose the Unformatted Text option from the
Paste Special dialog box and click OK, and the text is pasted into Word as
plain text and not as some Web object doodad.
Copying or moving a block with the mouse
When you have to move a block only a short distance, you can use the
mouse to drag-move or drag-copy the block. This feature is handy, but usu-
ally works best if you’re moving or copying between two locations that you
can see right on the screen. Otherwise, you’re scrolling your document with
the mouse while you’re playing with blocks, which is like trying to grab an
angry snake.
To move any selected block of text with the mouse, just drag the block:
Point the mouse cursor anywhere in the blocked text, and then drag the
block to its new location. Notice how the mouse pointer changes, as shown
in the margin. That means you’re moving the text.
Copying a block with the mouse works just like moving the block, except that
you press the Ctrl key as you drag. When you do that, a plus sign appears in
the mouse pointer (see the margin). That’s your sign that the block is being
copied and not just moved.
The Paste Options icon appears after you’ve “dropped” the chunk of
f
text. Refer to the preceding section for more information on the Paste
Options icon.
When you drag a block of text with the mouse, you’re not copying it to
o
the Clipboard. You cannot use the Paste (Ctrl+V) command to paste
in the block again.
A linked copy is created by dragging a selected block of text with the
the
mouse and holding down both the Shift and Ctrl keys. When you release
se
the mouse button, the copied block plops down into your document
with a dark highlight. That’s your clue that the copy is linked to the 
original; changes in the original are reflected in the copy and vice versa.
90
Part II: Word Processing Basics 
Add security to pdf in reader - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
create pdf security; add security to pdf in reader
Add security to pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
create secure pdf online; decrypt password protected pdf
Copying and moving with the F2 key
Another way to move or copy a block is to press the F2 key after the block is
selected. As long as you can remember the F2 key, moving or copying a block
by using this technique can be very handy, as explained here:
1. Select a block of text.
2. Press the F2 key.
Notice how the status bar says “Move to where?”
3. Move the insertion pointer to where you want to paste.
Use the cursor keys or scroll with the mouse. Wherever you move the
insertion pointer is where the text is pasted.
4. Press Enter to paste the text.
And the block is moved.
To copy rather than move a block, press Shift+F2 in Step 2. The status bar
says “Copy to where?”
The Miracle of Collect-and-Paste
When you copy or paste a block of text, that block is placed into a storage
place called the Clipboard. The block of text remains on the Clipboard until
il
it’s replaced by something else — another block of text or a graphic or any-
thing cut or copied in Windows. (The Clipboard is a Windows thing, which is
how you can copy and paste between Windows applications.)
In Word, however, the Clipboard can hold more than one thing at time. This
allows you to copy, copy, copy, and then use a special Clipboard view pane
to selectively paste text back into your document. They call it “collect and
paste,” and I firmly believe that this is a handy and welcome feature — but
one that also takes a bit of explaining.
Looking at the Clipboard
Word lets you see the contents of the Clipboard, to view the last several
items that have been cut or copied and, optionally, paste those items back
into your document.
91
Chapter 7: Text Blocks, Stumbling Blocks, Writer’s Blocks
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
manipulations. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB
create encrypted pdf; decrypt a pdf file online
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
decrypt pdf with password; convert locked pdf to word online
To view the Clipboard task pane (its official name), click the thing in the
he
lower-right corner of the Clipboard group on the Home tab, right next to the
word Clipboard. The Clipboard task pane then appears in the writing part
rt
of Word’s window, perhaps looking similar to what’s shown in Figure 7-4.
The scrolling list contains the last several items you’ve copied, not only from
Word but from other programs as well.
Pasting items from the Clipboard task pane is covered in the next section.
You can use the Copy command multiple times in a row to collect text
t
when the Clipboard task pane is visible.
The Clipboard can hold only 24 items. If any more than that is copied or
r
cut, the older items in the list are “pushed off” to make room for the new
ones. The current number of items is shown at the top of the task pane.
Other programs in Microsoft Office (Excel and PowerPoint, for example)
)
also share this collect-and-paste feature.
You can close the task pane when you’re done with collect and paste:
:
Click the X in the upper-right corner of the task pane window.
Pasting from the Clipboard task pane
To paste any collected text from the Clipboard view pane into your docu-
ment, simply click the mouse on that chunk of text. The text is copied from
the Clipboard and inserted into your document at the insertion pointer’s
location, just as though you typed it yourself.
Figure 7-4:
The
Clipboard
task pane.
92
Part II: Word Processing Basics 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
How to improve PDF document security. PDF Annotation. Users can freely add text annotation, freehand annotation, lines, figures and highlight annotations to PDF
pdf security remover; secure pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. 2. Add fill extension such as validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
pdf security password; decrypt pdf online
After pasting, the Paste Options icon appears next to the pasted text. Refer to
the section “Options for pasting text,” earlier in this chapter, to find out what
do to with that thing.
You can click the Paste All button to paste each and every item from the
e
Clipboard into your document.
Click only once! When you double-click, you insert two copies of
of
the text.
Cleansing the Clipboard task pane
You’re free to clean up Word’s Clipboard whenever the Clipboard task pane is
visible. To remove a single item, point the mouse at that item and click the
downward-pointing triangle to the right of the item. Choose Delete from the
shortcut menu, and that one item is zapped from the Clipboard.
To whack all the items on the Clipboard, click the Clear All button at the top
of the Clipboard task pane. I do this if I plan on collecting several items to be
pasted at once elsewhere. For example, I click Clear All and then go out and
copy, copy, copy. Then I move the insertion pointer to where I want every-
thing pasted and click the Paste All button — and I’m done.
Note that you cannot undo any clearing or deleting that’s done in the
Clipboard task pane. Be careful!
93
Chapter 7: Text Blocks, Stumbling Blocks, Writer’s Blocks
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Document Protection. XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. Password, digital
create encrypted pdf; convert secure pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Security PDF component download. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. This .NET PDF Document Add-On integrates mature PDF document
copy text from encrypted pdf; copy locked pdf
94
Part II: Word Processing Basics 
C# Image: C# Code to Upload TIFF File to Remote Database by Using
save the ImageUploadService file, add a web using System.Security.Cryptography; private void tsbUpload_Click & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change security on pdf; change security settings pdf reader
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer correspond site-> Edit Permissions -> Security -> Group or user names -> Edit -> Add -> Add Everyone usersgiven
decrypt pdf without password; change pdf document security
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
8
P
r
o
o
f
i
n
g
Y
o
u
r
D
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
(
S
p
e
l
l
i
n
g
a
n
d
G
r
a
m
m
a
r
)
In This Chapter
Understanding document proofing
Dealing with typos and spelling errors
Adding or ignoring unknown words
Correcting words automatically
Fixing grammatical boo-boos
Reviewing your document quickly
Finding synonyms with the thesaurus
Using the reference tools
Counting your words
I don’t give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way.
— Mark Twain
I
turn to no greater source on the subject of spelling and grammar than
my favorite American author, Mark Twain. His thoughts on the topic are
abundant.
Twain once described spelling in the English language as “drunken.”
Specifically, Twain blamed the alphabet. Me? I peg the problem on vowels,
but I mostly blame all the foreign words in English. Come to think of it, about
60 percent of English is composed of foreign words. Just pluck them out and
the language would be perfect! But I digress.
This chapter covers Word’s amazing proofing tools. These include the spell
checker, the grammar-checking thing, plus other amazing tools and features
to help you get just the right word, use it, and spell it correctly.
Hun Dewing Yore Mist Aches
As the title of this section suggests, it may very well be true that Word’s 
document proofing tools know an impressive number of words and have 
mastered countless grammatical rules, and they may do their darndest to
recognize context, but they still often fail. So, just because it appears that
at
your document contains no errors doesn’t mean that everything is perfect.
There’s no better way to proof a document than to read it with human eyes.
(My editor enthusiastically agrees!)
Check Your Spelling
Word’s built-in spell checker works the second you start typing. Like a
hungry leopard, the spell checker is ready to pounce on its unsuspecting
prey, the misspelled word or typo!
Spelling is corrected in two ways in Word. The most obvious way is that an
unrecognized word is underlined with a red zigzag. More subtly, the offending
word is corrected for you automatically. That feature, AutoCorrect, is covered
later in this chapter.
The red zigzag of shame
Word has an internal library consisting of tens of thousands of words, all
spelled correctly. When you type a word that doesn’t exist in the library
(yeah, looking up words is one thing the computer can do quickly), the word
that’s typed is marked as suspect. It appears underlined with a red zigzag, as
shown in Figure 8-1. What to do, what to do?
My advice: Keep typing. Don’t let the “red zigzag of a failed elementary educa-
tion” perturb you. It’s more important to get your thoughts up on the screen
than to stop and fuss over inevitable typos.
96
Part II: Word Processing Basics 
When you’re ready, say, during one of those inevitable pauses that takes
place as you write, go back and fix your spelling errors. Here’s what to do:
1. Locate the misspelled word.
Look for the red zigzag underline.
2. Right-click the misspelled word.
Up pops a shortcut menu and the Mini Toolbar, similar to what’s shown
in Figure 8-2.
3. Choose from the list the word you intended to type.
In Figure 8-2, the word tongue fits the bill. Click that word and it’s auto-
o-
matically inserted into your document, to replace the spurious word.
Figure 8-2:
Choose the
properly
spelled
word from
the list.
Figure 8-1:
The word
t
o
u
n
g
e
is
flagged as
misspelled.
97
Chapter 8: Proofing Your Document (Spelling and Grammar)
If the word you intended to type isn’t on the list, don’t fret. Word isn’t that
smart. You may have to use a real dictionary or take another stab at spelling
the word phonetically and then correct it again.
The Mini Toolbar, shown at the top of the menu in Figure 8-2, is used for
r
quick formatting. It’s the same Mini Toolbar that appears when you
select text (see Chapter 7); it also appears whenever you right-click text,
as is done with a spell-check correction.
Word turns off automatic proofing when your document grows over a
a
specific size. For example, on my computer, when the document is more
than 100 pages long, automatic spell checking is disabled. A warning
appears to alert you when this happens. Note that you can still manually
spell-check, which is covered in the section “Proofing Your Entire
Document at Once,” later in this chapter.
What to do when the spell checker 
stupidly assumes that a word is 
misspelled but in fact it isn’t
Occasionally, Word’s spell checker bumps into a word it doesn’t recognize,
such as your last name or perhaps your city. Word dutifully casts doubt on
the word, by underlining it with the notorious red zigzag. Yes, this is one of
those cases where the computer is wrong.
When a word is flagged as incorrectly spelled or as a typo, you can use two
commands, both of which are found on the pop-up menu when you right-click
the word (refer to Figure 8-2). The commands are Ignore All and Add to
Dictionary.
Ignore All: Select this command when the word is properly spelled and you
u
don’t want Word to keep flagging it as misspelled.
For example, in your science fiction short story, there’s a character named
Zadlux. Word believes it to be a spelling error, but you (and all the people of
the soon-to-be-conquered planet Drebulon) know better. After you choose the
Ignore All command, all instances of the suspect word are cheerfully ignored,
but only in that one document.
Add to Dictionary: This command adds words to the list that Word refers to
o
so that the word becomes part of the internal Spelled Correctly library.
98
Part II: Word Processing Basics 
For example, I once lived on Pilchuck Avenue, which Word thinks is a mis-
spelling of the word Paycheck. If only. So, when I right-click the incorrectly
ly
flagged word, I choose the Add to Dictionary command. Presto — the word
Pilchuck is added to Word’s internal dictionary. I’ll never have to spell-check
k
that work again.
If the word looks correct but is red-wiggly-underlined anyway, it could be
e
a repeated word. Those are flagged as misspelled by Word, so you can
either choose to delete the repeated word or just ignore it.
Word ignores certain types of words. For example, words with numbers
s
in them or words written in all capitals, which are usually abbreviations.
For example, Pic6 is ignored because it has a 6 in it. The word NYEP is
ignored because it’s in all caps.
You can adjust how spell-checking works, especially if you feel that it’s
s
being too picky. See the section “Customizing Proofing Options,” later in
this chapter.
Undoing an Ignore All command
Choosing the Ignore All command means that all instances of a given mis-
spelled word or typo are ignored in your document. This holds true even
when you save that document and open it again later. So, if you make a mis-
take and would rather have the ignored word regarded once more, do this:
1. Click the Word Options button on the Office Button menu.
The Word Options window appears.
2. Choose Proofing on the left side of the window.
3. Scroll down the right side of the window (if necessary) until you can
see the Recheck Document button; click that button.
A warning dialog box appears, reminding you of what you’re about
to do.
4. Click the Yes button.
Everything you’ve told Word to ignore while proofing your document is
now ignored. It’s the ignore-ignore command!
5. Click the OK button to return to your document.
99
Chapter 8: Proofing Your Document (Spelling and Grammar)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested