convert pdf to tiff programmatically c# : Change security on pdf software SDK dll winforms wpf .net web forms IJRER%20-%20StephanieReview0-part91

INTERNATIONAL!JOURNAL!OF!RENEWABLE!ENERGY!RESEARCH!!
Lau"et"al.",!Vol.4,!No.3,!2014"
Development in Photoanode Materials for High 
Efficiency Dye Sensitized Solar Cells 
Stephanie Chai Tying Lau *, Jedol Dayou **, Coswald Stephen Sipaut*, Rachel Fran Mansa *‡ 
* Energy and Materials Research Group (EMRG), Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400 
Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, MALAYSIA. 
** Energy, Vibration and Sound Research Group (e-VIBS), Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia 
Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, MALAYSIA 
(slct88@gmail.com, jed@ums.edu.my, cssums@gmail.com, rfmansa@ums.edu.my) 
‡ 
Corresponding Author; Rachel Fran Mansa, Tel: +60 88320000, Fax:+60 88320286, rfmansa@ums.edu.my 
Received: 30.06.2014 Accepted:29.08.2014
Abstract-  Dye-sensitized  solar  cells  (DSSC)  have  been  extensively  studied  due  to  their  promising  potential  for  high 
efficiency, low production cost and eco-friendly production. The photoanode is one of the main components in DSSCs which 
determines its performance. The main issues facing in DSSCs are the charge recombinations and low light harvesting capacity. 
Conventional TiO
2
nanoparticles with large surface area has low light scattering ability and low electron transport rate while 
one dimensional nanostructures have high electron transport rate and good light scattering ability but has a low surface area. 
Different approaches such as nanocomposite, light scattering layer and hierarchical structures to improve performance of 1D 
DSSCs are discussed.  Besides that, works  done  on the  optimization of  TiO
2
photoanode in cobalt based DSSC is also 
discussed. Additionally, doping of TiO
2
to improve the properties of TiO
2
and studies on alternative photoanode materials 
which involved the application of band gap engineering are discussed to further improve the performance of DSSCs. 
Keywords- Dye Sensitized Solar Cells; Photoanode; Charge recombination; Light harvesting. 
1.  Introduction 
With  the  growing  demand  for  sustainable  energy 
sources,  dye  sensitized  solar  cells  (DSSCs)  have  been 
intensively  studied  as  potential  alternatives  for  the  next 
generation  solar  cells  due  to  their  low  production  cost, 
relatively high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and eco-
friendly production when compared with silicon solar cells 
[1-4].  
DSSC was first reported by Gratzel and coworkers in 
1991[1]. Typically, DSSC comprised of a photoanode with 
sensitizer  attached  on  the  surface  of  the  wide  band  gap 
semiconductor layer coated on transparent conductive glass 
(TCO),  an  iodine  based  redox-coupled  electrolyte  and  a 
counter electrode of TCO coated with a platinum layer [1, 5, 
6]. To date, a PCE up to 12% has been reported by using the 
cobalt electrolyte and porphyrin sensitized TiO
2
photoanode 
[7, 8].  
The photoanode which is one of the main components 
in DSSCs, is usually fabricated using photoanode materials 
such as TiO
2
due to their large surface area to volume ratios 
[1,  7,  9].  However,  the  conversion  efficiency  of 
TiO
2
nanoparticles-based DSSCs was limited  by the slow 
transportation of electrons through the randomly arranged 
nanoparticles  as  well as  the  energy  losses  caused  by  the 
recombination [10, 11].   
In recent years, many attempts were made to overcome 
the limitations by  improving or  varying the structure and 
morphology  as  well  as  the  surface  properties  of  the 
photoanode  materials.  In  this  paper,  we  review  the 
development of photoanode materials in the dye sensitized 
solar  cells  to  improve  the  overall  power  conversion 
efficiency of the DSSC. The main findings and limitations 
of each approach are discussed for further development of 
high efficiency dye sensitized solar cell.  
2.  Operating Principle of DSSC 
DSSCs works based on the photoinjection of electrons 
from sensitizer (Pathway 1, Figure 1) into the conduction 
band (E
c
) of metal oxide semiconductor (Pathway 2, Figure 
1)  upon irradiation by sunlight. Subsequently, the excited 
sensitizer is reduced back to the ground state by electrons 
donation  from  the  iodide/triiodide  redox  couples  in  the 
electrolyte (Pathway  3, Figure 1).  Regeneration of  iodide 
ions,  which  are  oxidized  to  triiodide  in  this  reaction  is 
achieved by electrons transferred from the counter electrode 
(Pathway 4, Figure 1). The circuit is completed through the 
Change security on pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt pdf file online; decrypt pdf without password
Change security on pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change pdf document security; secure pdf file
INTERNATIONAL!JOURNAL!OF!RENEWABLE!ENERGY!RESEARCH!!
Lau"et"al.",!Vol.4,!No.3,!2014"
666!
external load. However, recombination reaction may occur 
during the process. The injected electrons in the conduction 
band  of  semiconductor  can  recombine  with  either  the 
excited  sensitizer  or  the  oxidized  form  of  the  iodide 
electrolyte as shown in fig.1 (Pathway 5 and 6) [12].   
Fig. 1. Schematic energy diagram and operating principle 
of DSSC. Adapted from [Source: 13]. 
The  performance of a DSSC  depends  on the energy 
levels  of  the  component  (sensitizer,  photoanode  and 
electrolyte)  in  DSSC. The energy difference  between  the 
highest occupied molecular orbital, HOMO and the lowest 
unoccupied molecular orbital, LUMO of the sensitizer (ΔE
1
will  determine  the  amount  of  photocurrent  obtained  in 
DSSC. The maximum open circuit voltage of DSSC, on the 
other hand depends on the energy difference between the 
Fermi level (maximum energy that any electron may possess 
at  absolute  zero  temperature)  [14]  and  electrolyte  redox 
potential (ΔE
2
). For efficient electron injection, the energy 
level of the LUMO must be sufficiently high (i.e., >0.2 eV) 
in energy  (moving upward in  the energy  level  axis) with 
respect to the E
c
of photoanode. The HOMO level of the 
sensitizer  must  be  sufficiently  low  in  energy  (moving 
downward in the energy level axis) than the redox potential 
of the I
/I
3
redox electrolyte for efficient regeneration of 
oxidized dye [13]. 
The  conversion  efficiency  of  the  solar  cell,  ɳ  is 
determined  by  its  current–voltage  characteristics, 
specifically  the  open-circuit  photovoltage  (V
oc
),  the 
photogenerated current density measured under short-circuit 
conditions (J
sc
), light irradiance (I
o
) and the fill factor of the 
cell (FF), which depends on the series resistances and on the 
shunt  resistances  in  the  cell  [15].  The  short-circuit 
photocurrent  (J
sc
 is  essentially  related  to  the  amount  of 
sunlight harvested in the visible part of the solar spectrum 
by the sensitizer. The open-circuit voltage (V
oc
) is related to 
the  energy  difference  between  the  quasi-Fermi  level  of 
electrons in the semiconductor and the chemical potential of 
the redox mediator in the electrolyte. The related equation 
under standard illumination is shown in equation (1) [15-
17].  
ɳ = (J
sc 
V
oc 
FF)/I
o
(1)                                                                   
3.  Photoanode Materials in DSSCs 
In general, a photoanode material is composed of metal 
oxide  semiconductor  which  has  high  surface  area  for 
sufficient dye adsorption, highly porous for effective mass 
transport by diffusion and a suitable band gap that matches 
with the sensitizer for effective electron injection and fast 
electron  transport.  The  combined  improvements  in  this 
factor  contribute  to  a  higher  charge-collection  efficiency 
[18-22].  
Wide band gap metal oxide semiconductor (E
g
> 3eV) 
such as TiO
2
, ZnO, SnO
2
and Nb
2
O
5
have been commonly 
used  as  photoanode  materials  due  to  their  good  stability 
against photocorrosion (transparent to the major part of the 
solar  spectrum)  and  good  electronic  properties  [23-26]. 
Photocorrosion  which  caused  by  the  oxidation  of  holes 
(generated  through  band  gap  excitation)  with  the  redox 
electrolytes  may  affect  the  performance  of  the 
semiconductor.      
The  efficiency of  the  DSSCs  fabricated with  various 
photoanode materials is shown in Table 1. At present, TiO
2
nanoparticle which gives the highest recorded efficiencies 
(12.3 %) has been  to be the  best photoanode  material  in 
DSSCs  [7,  27].  Moreover,  TiO
2
is  a  low  cost,  widely 
available, non-toxic and biocompatible material. It has been 
used in health care products as well as domestic applications 
such as paint pigmentation [28].  
On the other hand, ZnO which has a similar conduction 
band edge and working function as TiO
2
, but with the higher 
carrier mobility than TiO
2
was considered as a promising 
photoanode of DSSCs. However, the instability of ZnO in 
the  acidic  environment  and  formation  of  dye  aggregates 
deteriorates its performance [29]. Some other semiconductor 
materials,  such  as  Zn
2
SnO
4
[30],  WO
[31], SrTiO
3
[32],  
have been applied to the electrodes for DSCs. However, the 
efficiency of these DSCs still cannot compete with TiO
2
-
based DSCs. 
Table 1. Comparison in performance of DSSCs with 
different photoanode materials  
Photoanode 
material 
Band gap 
ɳ (%) 
Reference 
TiO
2
3.23 
12.3 
[7] 
ZnO 
3.3 
5.60 
[29] 
Nb
2
O
5
3.49 
5.00 
[25] 
Zn
2
SnO
4
3.7 
3.70 
[30] 
SrTiO
3
3.2 
1.80 
[32] 
WO
2.6-3.0 
0.75 
[31] 
SnO
2
3.6 
0.30 
[33] 
Typically, TiO
2
exists in three crystalline forms which 
are rutile with energy band, E
g
of 3.05 eV, anatase with E
g
of 3.23 eV and brookite with E
g
of 3.26 eV. The anatase 
TiO
2
provides a higher surface area for dye loading and a 
higher  electron  diffusion  coefficient  than  the  rutile 
nanoparticle photoanode. However, brookite is difficult to 
produce  and  is  therefore  not  considered  in  the  DSSC 
application  [34,  35].  Therefore,  the  anatase  TiO
2
nanoparticle is widely used as the main component of the 
photoanode in DSSCs.  
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB.NET: Necessary DLLs for PDF Password Edit.
pdf password encryption; copy text from locked pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
pdf security; convert locked pdf to word online
INTERNATIONAL!JOURNAL!OF!RENEWABLE!ENERGY!RESEARCH!!
Lau"et"al.",!Vol.4,!No.3,!2014"
667!
4.  The Main Issues Affecting the Performance of TiO
2
based DSSC 
Conventional  TiO
2
photoanode  film  usually  exhibits 
high  transparency  and  weak  light  scattering  due  to  the 
nanometer particle  size,  resulting  in  poor  light-harvesting 
efficiency (LHE). Furthermore, the slow electron transport 
rate and low electron mobility  of TiO
2
nanoparticles also 
leads  to  charge  recombination  in  TiO
2
based  DSSC. 
Recently,  mass  transport  issues  which  causing  charge 
recombination in cobalt electrolyte based DSSC has been 
raised up. TiO
2
photoanode film prepared in conventional 
method is no longer suitable for cobalt based DSSC which 
reported highest PCE recently[7]. In this section, issues on 
light harvesting efficiency and charge recombination in TiO
based DSSC are discussed. 
4.1  Light Harvesting Efficiency  
As  discussed  in  Section  3,  conventional  TiO
2
nanoparticles  (10-20nm)  which  has  high  specific  surface 
area (50 -100 m
2
/g) has been used in most DSSC. However, 
TiO
2
nanoparticles which has large surface area usually have 
low light-scattering ability. The particle size (20nm) which 
is smaller  than  the  wavelength  of visible  light  (400  nm) 
allows transmittance of most of the visible light before being 
absorbed by the photosensitizer. This may lead to low light 
harvesting efficiency [36, 37].  
To tackle this issue, the concept of the bilayer structure 
with  a  scattering  layer  made  of  TiO
2
large  particle  with 
several hundred nanometers in size as the overlayer has been 
proposed. This bilayer structure could enhance the LHE by 
confining  the  incident  light  within  the  photoanode  via 
scattering or diffracting it backward [38-41]. However, the 
introduction of such large particles would reduce the dye-
loading capacity of the photoanode due to the decrease of 
the specific surface area, and thus leading to the decrease of 
the photocurrent, to some extent. Thus, new multifunctional 
TiO
photoanode materials, offering both a good capability 
for light scattering and a high specific surface area for dye 
loading, should be synthesized for application to the DSSCs 
[41]. 
4.2.  Charge Recombination 
A conventional TiO
2
nanoparticle comes with numorous 
defects (usually located at the TiO
2
/electrolyte interface, in 
the bulk of the TiO
particles, or at grain boundaries)     and 
surface  states  (the  energy  states  generated  below  the 
conduction  band  of  TiO
2
nanoparticles)  which  limits  the 
electron  transportation.  Figure  2  shows  the  electron 
transportation path  in  TiO
nanoparticles.  As the electron 
diffused within the TiO
2
network via hopping mechanism, 
this defect in the TiO
2
nanoparticles and surface state will 
definitely  serve  as  trap  centers  to  retard  electron 
transportation.  Once  the  electron  being  trapped,  it  may 
undergo recombination reaction with the oxidized sensitizer 
or oxidized iodide in DSSC. 
Surface treatment of TiO
2
nanoparticles such as TiCl
4
treatment (formed a thin blocking layer on the photoanode 
surface)  and  TiO
2
core shell  structure  (additional  energy 
barrier layer coated  on surface of TiO
2
nanoparticle) was 
often  performed  to  suppress  charge  recombination  and 
facilitate charge transport [34, 42-45] .  
Besides that, one dimensional (1D) nanostructures such 
as nanowires, nanotube and nanorods which has excellent 
electron  transport  and  light  scattering  ability  have  been 
studied as photoanode materials in DSSC to reduce charge 
recombination  [46-48].  However,  DSSC  with  this 
configuration shows lower efficiency (9%) compared to the 
TiO
2
nanoparticle film (12%) due to its low internal surface 
area leads to insufficient dye adsorption, and therefore low 
LHE.  Table  2  shows  the  performance  of  TiO
2
1D 
nanostructures  compared  to  the  conventional  TiO
2
nanoparticle.  Until  now,  it  is  still  remain  challenge  to 
improve the electron transport and light scattering abilities 
without sacrificing its internal surface area. 
Table 2. Performance of TiO
2
1D nanostructures based on 
highest efficiency  
1D nanostructures 
Efficiency, %  References 
TiO
2
nanowire 
9.33 
[49] 
TiO
2
nanorod 
9.00 
[50] 
TiO
2
-nanotube arrays 
9.1 
[51] 
TiO
2
nanoparticle 
12.3 
[7] 
Apart  from  that,  DSSC  based  on  cobalt  electrolyte 
which  had  achieved  higher  PCE  compared  to the  iodide 
based DSSC also suffered from recombination issues. The 
photovoltaic  performance  of  DSSC  based  on  electrolytes 
consisting cobalt complexes is constrained by mass transport 
limitations of the mediator. In this case, the thickness and 
the porosity of the photoanode was found to be very crucial. 
Conventional TiO
2
nanoparticles with pore size of 20 nm 
allows effective mass transport and electrolyte penetration in 
iodide  based  DSSC  but  not  in  the  case  of  cobalt  based 
DSSC.  This  increases  the  risk  of  charge  recombination. 
Thus, TiO
2
film porosity should be optimized to enhance the 
performance of cobalt based DSSC.  
5.  Development of TiO
2
Morphology in High Efficiency 
DSSC 
As has been discussed before, the main issues facing in 
conventional  TiO
2
nanoparticles  based  DSSC  are  high 
charge recombination and  low LHE. Introduction of  light 
scattering layer of large TiO
2
particles increase the LHE but 
also  reduce  the  surface  area  for  dye  loading.  1D  TiO
2
nanostructures  has  excellent  electron  transport  to  reduce 
charge  recombination  and  light  scattering  abilities  for 
excellent LHE. However, its performance was limited by the 
low  surface  area  causing  poor  dye  loading.  Thus,  a 
photoanode materials with high surface area, fast electron 
transport and good light scattering ability is needed for high 
efficiency DSSC. 
Recent  development  in  TiO
2
photoanode  materials 
focused  on  solving  surface  area  limitations  in  1D 
nanostructures  by  introducing  nanocomposite  and 
hierarchical  structures  in  DSSC.  Besides  that,  alternative 
scattering  layer  which include various nanoctructures has 
been  studied  to  substitute  the  conventional  large  particle 
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
easy as possible to change your PDF file permission settings. You can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security.
secure pdf; pdf password security
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
HTML5 Viewer. How to improve PDF document security. PDF Version. • C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports adobe PDF version 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 and 1.7.
create encrypted pdf; add security to pdf
INTERNATIONAL!JOURNAL!OF!RENEWABLE!ENERGY!RESEARCH!!
Lau"et"al.",!Vol.4,!No.3,!2014"
668!
TiO
2
scattering  layer.  Therefore,  in  this  section, 
development in TiO
2
photoanode materials which is divided 
into nanocomposite, hierarcical structure and light scattering 
layer  will  be  discussed.  Besides  that,  works  done  in 
optimizing TiO
2
photoanode for application in cobalt based 
DSSC. 
5.1.  Nanocomposite 
As  discussed  in Section  4.1, 1D TiO
2
nanostructures 
suffer from low internal surface area which caused the poor 
dye loading and thereby lower performance compare to the 
TiO
2
nanoparticle films. Mixing one-dimensional materials 
with the nanoparticles  has been  a successful approach  in 
improving the surface area for dye loading and thus, device 
performance  [52,  53].  Besides  that,  highly  electrically 
conductive  carbon  materials,  such  as  carbon  nanotubes 
(CNTs) [58], and graphene [54] was incorporated into TiO
2
to improve  the charge collection efficiency  [55].  Table 3 
shows  the  performance  of  TiO
2
nanocomposite  with 
different materials. 
Table 3.  Performance of TiO
2
nanocomposite (NC) in DSSC 
Nanomaterial/nanoparticle  (NP) 
Efficiency (%) of NC/NP 
References 
TiO
2
nanotube/2% NP 
8.43/5.01 
[56] 
TiO
2
nanorod/NP 
7.12/5.82 
[57] 
TiO
2
nanowire/NP 
3.8/2.45 
[58] 
0.025%wt MWCNT/TiO
NP 
10.29/6.31 
[18] 
1%wt graphene/ TiO
NP 
6.86/5.98 
[54] 
From  Table  3,  the  blending  and  mixing  of  1D 
nanostructures  with  nanoparticles  showed  an  improved 
efficiency compared to the bare TiO
2
nanoparticles. TiO
2
-
MWCNT  (Multiwall  Carbon  Nanotube)  nanocomposite 
shows  the  highest  efficiency  of  10.29%  and  highest 
increment due to the unique electrical properties of CNT. 
CNT not only have a large electrons-storage capacity, but 
also show electronic conductivity similar to that of metals. 
Besides that, incorporation of graphene into the TiO
2
matrix 
also  enhance  electron  transport  while  reduce  charge 
recombination.  However,  recombination  reaction  may 
happen  in  this  monolayer  structure  which  affects  the 
performance. Furthermore, single layer film cannot harvest 
light well due to its shorter electron path. 
5.2  Light Scattering Layer 
In  order  to  improve  light  scattering and dye  loading 
simultaneously,  bilayer  structure  with  one  dimensional 
material  overlayer has  been  proposed  to  replace  the 
conventional TiO
2
large particles scattering layer which has 
low dye loading ability together with TiO
2
nanoparticles as 
the under-layer [59, 60]. Table 4 shows the effect of light 
scattering  overlayer  on  the  performance  of  double  layer 
DSSCs.  
Table 4. Effect of light scattering overlayer on the performance of double layer DSSCs 
Light Scattering layer (SC) 
Underlayer 
Jsc (mAcm
-2
with SC 
(without SC) 
ɳ (%) 
with SC 
(without SC) 
Reference 
Hollow spherical TiO2 
TiO
2
Nanoparticle 
15.8(12.5) 
9.43(7.79) 
[36] 
400 nm-sized TiO2 
TiO
2
Nanoparticle 
14.6(12.5) 
8.96(7.79) 
[36] 
TiO
2
beads 
TiO
2
Nanoparticle 
15.47(13.25) 
8.84(7.38) 
[61] 
400-nm TiO
2
TiO
2
Nanoparticle 
14.56(13.25) 
7.87(7.38) 
[61] 
From  Table  4,  the  highest  conversion  efficiency  of 
9.43% was being achieved after hollow spherical TiO
2
was 
introduced  as  the  scattering  layer.  When  comparing  the 
photovoltaic  performance  of  hollow  spherical  TiO
2
overlayer  and  400  nm-diameter  TiO
2
overlayer,  hollow 
spherical  TiO
2
overlayer  shows  a  higher  J
SC
 The  TiO
2
hollow spherical particles are believed to be able to adsorb 
dye  efficiently  and  has  good  light  scattering  ability 
compared to the commonly used which only provide light 
scattering ability. 
Besides  that,  DSSC  prepared  with  the  beads  as  a 
scattering layer have also shown similar result. This shows 
that  bilayer  structured  photoanodes  with  nanocrystalline 
aggregates  as  light-scattering  particles  is  a  promising 
approach to enhance the efficiency of DSSCs. However, the 
increase in thickness with  the use  of multilayer structure 
films may lead to the higher recombination rate. 
5.3 Hierarchical Structrures 
Hierarchical structures such as spherical, quasi-1D or 
1D micro/nanoscale aggregates that could function as light 
scattering centers without sacrificing the internal surface and 
exhibit  better  electron  transport  properties  has  attracted 
much  interest  [62].  Hierarchically  structured  materials 
usually consists of assemblies of small building blocks, such 
as nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires, nanoplates, etc which 
is small in size so that high surface area can be retained in 
the new photoanode film, leading to a high load of the dye 
molecules [12]. Table 5 shows the performance of different    
nanostructured TiO
2
electrodes in DSSCs. 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
change security settings pdf; change pdf security settings
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security. We have a privacy
pdf password security; creating a secure pdf document
INTERNATIONAL!JOURNAL!OF!RENEWABLE!ENERGY!RESEARCH!!
Lau"et"al.",!Vol.4,!No.3,!2014"
669!
Table 5. Performance of different nanostructured TiO
2
electrodes in DSSCs 
Hierarchical Structure 
Assemble by 
Efficiency 
(Hierarchical) 
Efficiency 
(NP) 
Reference 
TiO
2
sphere 
nanorods and nanoparticles 
10.34 
8.10 
[63] 
Yolk –shell TiO
beads 
TiO
2
nanoparticle 
9.05 
7.56 
[64] 
nanoporous TiO
2
spheres 
TiO
2
nanoparticles 
8.44 
7.30 
[65] 
From  the  table,  we  have  demonstrated  that  the 
photoanode derived from spherical nanoparticle aggregates 
could  generate  efficiencies  comparable  to  or even higher 
than those made with TiO
2
nanoparticles due to their ability 
to  generate  effective  light  scattering  without  sacrificing 
internal surface area, the facilitation of electrolyte diffusion 
through the relatively open structure and the improvement of 
electron transport resulting from compact interconnection of 
nanoparticles.  
As  shown  in  the  table,  DSSC  with  TiO
2
sphere 
assemble by the nanorods and nanoparticle achieved highest 
increment compared to the other spherical TiO
2
assemble by 
TiO
2
nanoparticles.  This  may  due  to  its  superior  light 
scattering  ability which  contributed  to the  increase in the 
light harvesting efficiency. However, its poor contact with 
the FTO glass which leaves large uncovered space on FTO 
glass may lead to a higher interface resistance. Therefore, to 
obtain  a  higher  efficiency,  combination  of  hierarchical 
structure  layer and nanoparticles  which has  good  contact 
with  FTO glass within one film  electrode  is a promising 
approach. 
5.4  Optimization of TiO
2
Photoanode Materials for Cobalt 
Based DSSC 
Recently,  efficiencies  of  up  to  12.3%  have  been 
obtained in DSSC employing cobalt based electrolyte [7]. 
However, optimization of conventional  TiO
is pivotal  to 
achieve high performance in cobalt based DSSC. Previous 
investigations have suggested that the performance of cobalt 
redox mediators in DSCs is limited by rapid recombination 
from electrons in the TiO
2
conduction band to the cobalt(III) 
species and mass transport problems in the mesoporous TiO
2
electrode [66, 67]. 
To  retard  the  fast  recombination  between 
TiO
2
conduction band electrons and the oxidized species of 
the  cobalt(III/II)  electrolyte,  blocking  layer  has  been 
incorporated on the TiO
2
surface[66, 68]. Cobalt complexes 
are bulky and therefore need sufficiently large pores to avoid 
mass transport limitations in TiO
2
based DSSC [7]. A mixed 
TiO
2
macroporous–mesoporous  morphology  has  been 
introduced to assist the diffusion of  cobalt electrolyte [69]. 
Yella  and  coworkers  (2013)  manage  to  solve  the  mass 
transport issues in cobalt based DSSC by increasing TiO
2
pore size (from 23 nm to 32 nm) and reducing thickness of 
TiO
2
film [7]. 
6.  Band Gap Engineering to Improve   Performance of 
Photoanode Materials  
As discussed from Section 4.2, oxygen vacancy defects 
was found in the conventional TiO2 photoanode material. 
These defects trap the electrons, causing the recombination 
reaction  to  occur.  To  improve  the  performance  of  TiO
2
photoanode, it is necessary to tailor the band gap of TiO
2
so 
that  the  properties  of  TiO
2
can  be  improved.  Another 
possible solution is to discover new photoanode materials to 
substitute  TiO
2
nanoparticles.  The  band  gap  of 
semiconductors such as nanosilica (> 4 eV) can be tuned to 
be used in DSSC applications.  
6.1 Doping to Tailor the Band Gap of Photoanode Materials 
Recently, doping TiO
2
with metal or nonmetal ions has 
been  considered  as  a  promising  way  to  improve  the 
properties  of  TiO
2
photoanode.  Doping  could  change  the 
surface properties such as the band edge or surface states of 
TiO
2
[70]. The positive shift of conduction band (moving 
downward in y axis) results in an increased injection driving 
force  of  electrons  which  improve  the  electron  injection 
efficiency  from  the  LUMO  of  the  dye  to  the  TiO
2
conduction  band.  Fast  electron  transport  can  improve 
charge-collection efficiency and thus increase photocurrent 
density [71].   
Metal doping such as Nb, Sn, Zn and W doped TiO
2
has 
been found to exhibit a positive shift in a conduction band 
edge  which increase the electron  injection  efficiency  and 
suppressed the carrier  recombination [72,  73]. Doping  of 
nonmetals such as nitrogen, carbon, sulfur, and fluorine also 
shifts the conduction band edge of TiO
2
and decreases the 
concentration of oxygen vacancy by replacing the oxygen 
atoms which reduce the trapping of electrons at the defect 
sites [74].  Figure 2 shows the positive shift of E
with W 
doping. Performance of doped and undoped TiO
2
in DSSC 
was shown in Table 6. 
Fig. 2. Positive shift in E
c
of TiO
2
with W doping increases 
the driving force for electron injection (increases in 
J
sc
) and suppress recombination [Source:75].  
Positive!shift!
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
change security settings pdf reader; convert locked pdf to word doc
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
with a higher density and data security compared with barcode on a certain page of PDF or Word use barcode relocation API solution to change barcode position
copy text from locked pdf; decrypt a pdf file online
INTERNATIONAL!JOURNAL!OF!RENEWABLE!ENERGY!RESEARCH!!
Lau"et"al.",!Vol.4,!No.3,!2014"
670!
Table 6. Performance of doped and undoped TiO
2
in DSSC 
From Table 6 we can see that doping of TiO
2
improved 
the conversion efficiency of DSSC. Photocurrent, Jsc which 
depends on the driving force for electron injection, namely 
the difference between the conduction band and the LUMO 
is  increased  with  the  doping  of  TiO
2
 However,  the  V
oc 
which is dependent on the difference between the E
c
of TiO
2
and the redox potential of the redox couples electrolyte, is 
remain or slightly change with the doping of TiO
2
due to the 
positive shift in E
c.
Although extensive studies have been 
made on doping TiO
2
, none of which could both enhance the 
J
SC
and V
OC
6.2.  Band Gap Modification in Developing New Oxide 
Semiconductor   
It is well known that photoanode materials in DSSCs 
usually consists of wide band gap (> 3 eV) semiconductor 
oxide which is stable against photocorrosion. Besides that, 
the conduction band of semiconductor oxide must be lower 
than  the  LUMO  level  of  sensitizer  for  efficient  electron 
injection from  sensitizer. Conventional TiO
2
nanoparticles 
with the band gap of 3.2 eV has fullfilled the requirement of 
photoanode materials. However, silica which has wide band 
gap of 8.9 eV will definitely have a higher conduction band 
edge than the excited state energy level of sensitizer. This 
may  affect  the  working  mechanism  of  a  DSSC  as  the 
electron cannot be injected from sensitizer. Thus, narrowing 
band  gap  is  needed  in  order  to  use  it  as  a  photoanode 
materials [80]. 
It  has  been  reported  that  the  band  gap  of  a 
semiconductor material is a function of the particle size [81, 
82]. According to Brus and coworkers [82], the density of 
defects or surface states of semiconductor oxide increases 
with the decrease in particle size below a certain threshold. 
These defects create deep and shallow traps near the band 
edge of its electronic state causing reduction in band gap, 
that is, red-shift in absorption spectrum [81, 82]. However, 
when the size of semiconductor particle decreases from its 
bulk to that of Bohr radius, the band gap of semiconductor 
material  increases.  This  may  due  to  the  arising  of  size 
quantization effect [82]. Padavettan and coworkers (2009) 
studied on the  effect of particle size on the  band  gap of 
synthesized  nanosilica  and  found  that  the  decrease  in 
particle size from 400 nm to 7 nm, the band gap decreased 
from 6.03 to 5.89 eV [83]. Besides  that, Yelil Arasi and 
coworkers (2013) also reported reduction in band gap (3 - 4 
eV) with the nanosilica of 78 to 85 nm [84]. This shows a 
large reduction of band gap from the reported band gap of 
bulk  silica  (11 eV)  [85]. Lin and coworkers  (2006)  also 
reported  the  similar  result  where  the  band  gap  of  TiO
2
decreased from 3.239 to 3.173 eV  when the particle size 
decreased from 29 to 17 nm [86].  
From the above reported result, we can conclude that 
the band gap decreased (red  shift) to a  certain minimum 
value (critical size) with the decrease in particle size from its 
bulk  particle.  Further  decrease  in  particle  size  from  the 
critical  size  caused the band gap to  increase  (blue shift). 
Thus,  band  gap  of  semiconductor  such  as  silica  can  be 
narrowed with the decrease in particle size from bulk to its 
critical size.  
7.  Conclusions and Summary 
DSSCs  have  been  extensively  studied  due  to  their 
promising potential for high efficiency, low production cost 
and eco-friendly production.  However, recombination  and 
light  harvesting  issues  occurs  in  conventional  TiO
2
nanoparticles limits its improvement in efficiency. Surface 
treatment such as TiCl
4
treatment and core shell structure is 
advantageous  in  retarding  recombination.  Hierarchical 
structures which consists of assemblies of nanoparticles or 
1D nanoparticles is the most promising photoanode due to 
its excellent properties without compromising surface area 
of  the particles.  Mass transport limitation in cobalt  based 
DSSC can be overcome by  optimizing  the  pore  size  and 
thickness  of  TiO
2
photoanode.  Meanwhile,  band  gap 
tailoring  of  TiO
2
and  studies  on  alternative  photoanode 
materials  for future  development of DSSCs  can  be  done 
through band gap engineering to overcome the limits in TiO
2
nanoparticles.  Thus,  it  is  believed  that  with  the  above 
accomplishment,  DSSCs  will  become  one  of  the  most 
promising solar devices in next generation. 
Acknowledgments 
This  research  is supported  by  the  Malaysian  Ministry  of 
Education under the research grant number ERGS0022-TK-
1-2012  and  ERGS0019-TK-1/2012,  and  is  greatly 
acknowledged. 
References 
[1]   B.  O'Regan,  and  M.  Graetzel,  "Low-cost,  high-
efficiency solar cell based on dye-sensitized colloidal 
TiO2 films", Nature, vol. 353, pp. 737, 1991.  
[2]    Y.  Chiba,  A.  Islam,  Y.  Watanabe,  R.  Komiya,  N. 
Koide,  and L. Han, "Dye-sensitized solar  cells with 
conversion efficiency of 11.1%", Japanese Journal of 
Photoanode 
materials 
J
SC 
(mAcm
-2
(Doped/Undoped) 
V
oc
(V) 
(Doped/Undoped) 
ɳ (%) 
(Doped/Undoped) 
Reference 
W-doped TiO2 
8.94/7.05 
0.61/0.62 
4.20/3.37 
[75] 
Sn-doped TiO
16.01/15.15 
0.72/0.70 
8.31/7.45 
[76] 
Nb-doped TiO
17.67/11.87 
0.70/0.79 
7.8/6.6 
[77] 
N-doped TiO2 
11.56/9.35 
0.68/0.68 
6.25/5.08 
[78] 
F-doped TiO2
19.39/16.86 
0.66/0.66 
8.07/7.25 
[79] 
INTERNATIONAL!JOURNAL!OF!RENEWABLE!ENERGY!RESEARCH!!
Lau"et"al.",!Vol.4,!No.3,!2014"
671!
Applied Physics, Part 2:  Letters, vol. 45, pp.  L638-
L640, 2006.  
[3]    L.  Yang,  B.-g.  Zhai,  Q.-l.  Ma,  and  Y.M.  Huang, 
"Effect  of  ZnO  decoration  on  the  photovoltaic 
performance of TiO2 based dye sensitized solar cells", 
Journal of Alloys and Compounds, vol. 605, pp. 109-
112, 2014.  
[4]    R.F. Mansa, G. Govindasamy, Y.Y. Farm, H.A. Bakar, 
J. Dayou, and C.S. Sipaut, Hibiscus flower extract as 
the natural dye sensitizer for dye-sensitized solar cell, 
in, Journal of Physical Science, 2013, Accepted. 
[5]    M. Grätzel, "Photoelectrochemical cells", Nature, vol. 
414, pp. 338-344, 2001.  
[6]    R.F. Mansa,  A.R.A.  Yugis, K.S.  Liow,  S.C.T.  Lau, 
M.C. Ung, J. Dayou, and C.S. Sipaut, A Brief Review 
on  Photoanode,  Electrolyte,  and  Photocathode 
Materials  for  Dye-Sensitized  Solar  Cell  Based  on 
Natural  Dye  Photosensitizers,  in:  P.  Ravindra,  A. 
Bono, C.M. Chu (Eds.) Developments in Sustainable 
Chemical and Bioprocess  Technology,  Springer,  pp. 
313-319, 2013. 
[7]    A.  Yella,  H.W.  Lee,  H.N.  Tsao,  C.  Yi,  A.K. 
Chandiran,  M.K.  Nazeeruddin,  E.W.G.  Diau,  C.Y. 
Yeh, S.M. Zakeeruddin, and M. Grätzel, "Porphyrin-
sensitized solar cells with cobalt (II/III)-based redox 
electrolyte exceed 12 percent efficiency", Science, vol. 
334, pp. 629-634, 2011.  
[8]    W.Q. Wu, J.Y. Liao, H.Y. Chen, X.Y. Yu, C.Y. Su, 
and D.B. Kuang, "Dye-sensitized solar cells based on a 
double  layered  TiO2  photoanode  consisting  of 
hierarchical  nanowire  arrays  and  nanoparticles  with 
greatly improved photovoltaic  performance", Journal 
of  Materials  Chemistry,  vol.  22,  pp.  18057-18062, 
2012.  
[9]    S. Ito, P. Chen, P. Comte, M.K. Nazeeruddin, P. Liska, 
P.  Péchy,  and  M.  Grätzel,  "Fabrication  of  screen-
printing pastes from TiO2 powders for dye-sensitised 
solar cells", Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and 
Applications, vol. 15, pp. 603-612, 2007.  
[10]  Q. Huang, G. Zhou, L. Fang, L. Hu, and Z.S. Wang, 
"TiO2  nanorod  arrays  grown  from  a  mixed  acid 
medium  for  efficient  dye-sensitized  solar  cells", 
Energy and Environmental Science, vol. 4, pp. 2145-
2151, 2011.  
[11]  M. Wang, Y. Wang, and J. Li, "ZnO nanowire arrays 
coating  on  TiO2  nanoparticles  as  a  composite 
photoanode  for  a  high  efficiency  DSSC",  Chemical 
Communications, vol. 47, pp. 11246-11248, 2011.  
[12]  H.Y. Chen, D.B. Kuang, and C.Y. Su, "Hierarchically 
micro/nanostructured  photoanode  materials  for  dye-
sensitized solar cells", Journal of Materials Chemistry, 
vol. 22, pp. 15475-15489, 2012.  
[13]  K. Hara, and H. Arakawa, Dye-sensitized Solar Cells, 
in:  S.H.  Antonio  Luque  (Ed.)  Handbook  of 
Photovoltaic Science and  Engineering,  England:John 
Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2003. 
[14]  B.  Grob,  and  M.E.  Schultz,  Basic  electronics,  vol.  
Gregg Division, 1977. 
[15]  L.R.  Andrade,  and  A.H.A.  Mendes,  Dye-sensitized 
Solar Cells: An Overview in Energy Production and 
Storage: Inorganic Chemical Strategies for A Warming 
World, pp. 53-72, 2010.  
[16]  L.  Andrade,  J.  Sousa,  H.  Aguilar  Ribeiro,  and  A. 
Mendes,  "Phenomenological  modeling  of  dye-
sensitized solar cells under transient conditions", Solar 
Energy, vol. 85, pp. 781-793, 2011.  
[17]  J. Maçaira, L. Andrade, and A. Mendes, "Review on 
nanostructured  photoelectrodes  for  next  generation 
dye-sensitized solar cells", Renewable and Sustainable 
Energy Reviews, vol. 27, pp. 334-349, 2013.  
[18]  T.  Sawatsuk,  A.  Chindaduang,  C.  Sae-kung,  S. 
Pratontep, and G. Tumcharern, "Dye-sensitized solar 
cells based on TiO2-MWCNTs composite electrodes: 
Performance  improvement  and  their  mechanisms", 
Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 18, pp. 524-527, 
2009.  
[19]  S.R. Jang, R. Vittal, and K.J. Kim, "Incorporation of 
functionalized  single-wall  carbon  nanotubes  in  dye-
sensitized  TiO2 solar  cells",  Langmuir, vol. 20, pp. 
9807-9810, 2004.  
[20]  T.Y. Lee, P.S. Alegaonkar, and J.B. Yoo, "Fabrication 
of dye sensitized solar cell using TiO2 coated carbon 
nanotubes", Thin Solid Films, vol. 515, pp. 5131-5135, 
2007.  
[21]  S.L. Kim, S.R. Jang, R. Vittal, J. Lee, and K.J. Kim, 
"Rutile TiO2-modified multi-wall carbon nanotubes in 
TiO2  film  electrodes  for  dye-sensitized  solar  cells", 
Journal  of  Applied  Electrochemistry,  vol.  36,  pp. 
1433-1439, 2006.  
[22]  H.  Usui,  H.  Matsui,  N.  Tanabe,  and  S.  Yanagida, 
"Improved  dye-sensitized  solar  cells  using  ionic 
nanocomposite  gel  electrolytes",  Journal  of 
Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, vol. 
164, pp. 97-101, 2004.  
[23]  M.  Saito,  and  S.  Fujihara,  "Large  photocurrent 
generation in dye-sensitized ZnO solar cells", Energy 
& Environmental Science, vol. 1, pp. 280-283, 2008.  
[24]  B.  Onwona-Agyeman,  S.  Kaneko,  A.  Kumara,  M. 
Okuya, K. Murakami, A. Konno, and K. Tennakone, 
"Sensitization  of  nanocrystalline  SnO2  films  with 
indoline dyes", Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, 
Part 2: Letters, vol. 44, pp. L731-L733, 2005.  
[25]  P. Guo, and M.A. Aegerter, "RU(II) sensitized Nb2O5 
solar  cell  made by  the sol-gel process",  Thin  Solid 
Films, vol. 351, pp. 290-294, 1999.  
[26]  M. Grätzel, "The advent of mesoscopic injection solar 
cells",  Progress  in  Photovoltaics:  Research  and 
Applications, vol. 14, pp. 429-442, 2006.  
INTERNATIONAL!JOURNAL!OF!RENEWABLE!ENERGY!RESEARCH!!
Lau"et"al.",!Vol.4,!No.3,!2014"
672!
[27]  R.  Jose,  V.  Thavasi,  and  S.  Ramakrishna,  "Metal 
Oxides for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells", Journal of the 
American  Ceramic  Society,  vol.  92,  pp.  289-301, 
2009.  
[28]  M.  Grätzel,  "Dye-sensitized  solar  cells",  Journal  of 
Photochemistry and Photobiology C:  Photochemistry 
Reviews, vol. 4, pp. 145-153, 2003.  
[29]  H.  Minoura,  and  T.  Yoshida,  "Electrodeposition  of 
ZnO/dye  hybrid  thin  films  for  dye-sensitized  solar 
cells", Electrochemistry Tokyo, vol. 76, pp. 109, 2008.  
[30]  B. Tan, E. Toman, Y. Li, and Y. Wu, "Zinc stannate 
(Zn2SnO4) dye-sensitized solar cells", Journal of the 
American Chemical Society, vol. 129, pp. 4162-4163, 
2007.  
[31]  H.  Zheng,  Y.  Tachibana,  and  K.  Kalantar-Zadeh, 
"Dye-sensitized solar cells based on WO3", Langmuir, 
vol. 26, pp. 19148-19152, 2010.  
[32]  S. Burnside, J.-E. Moser, K. Brooks, M. Grätzel, and 
D.  Cahen,  "Nanocrystalline  mesoporous  strontium 
titanate as photoelectrode material for photosensitized 
solar  devices:  increasing  photovoltage  through 
flatband  potential  engineering",  The  Journal  of 
Physical Chemistry B, vol. 103, pp. 9328-9332, 1999.  
[33]  N. Nang Dinh, M.C. Bernard, A. Hugot-Le Goff, T. 
Stergiopoulos, and P. Falaras, "Photoelectrochemical 
solar  cells  based  on  SnO2  nanocrystalline  films", 
Comptes Rendus Chimie, vol. 9, pp. 676-683, 2006.  
[34]  N.G. Park, G. Schlichthörl, J. Van De Lagemaat, H.M. 
Cheong,  A.  Mascarenhas,  and  A.J.  Frank,  "Dye-
sensitized  TiO2  solar  cells:  Structural  and 
photoelectrochemical 
characterization 
of 
nanocrystalline electrodes formed from the hydrolysis 
of TiCl4", Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol. 103, 
pp. 3308-3314, 1999.  
[35]  N.G.  Park,  J.  Van  De  Lagemaat,  and  A.J.  Frank, 
"Comparison  of  dye-sensitized  rutile-  and  anatase-
based TiO2 solar cells", Journal of Physical Chemistry 
B, vol. 104, pp. 8989-8994, 2000.  
[36]  H.J. Koo, Y.J. Kim, Y.H. Lee, W.I. Lee, K. Kim, and 
N.G. Park, "Nano-embossed hollow spherical TiO2 as 
bifunctional material for high-efficiency dye-sensitized 
solar cells", Advanced Materials, vol. 20, pp. 195-199, 
2008.  
[37]  J.H. Park, S.Y. Jung, R. Kim, N.G. Park, J. Kim, and 
S.S. Lee, "Nanostructured photoelectrode consisting of 
TiO2 hollow spheres for non-volatile electrolyte-based 
dye-sensitized solar cells", Journal of Power Sources, 
vol. 194, pp. 574-579, 2009.  
[38]  Z.S.  Wang,  H.  Kawauchi,  T.  Kashima,  and  H. 
Arakawa, 
"Significant 
influence 
of 
TiO2 
photoelectrode morphology on the energy conversion 
efficiency  of  N719  dye-sensitized  solar  cell", 
Coordination Chemistry Reviews, vol. 248, pp. 1381-
1389, 2004.  
[39]  A.  Usami,  "Theoretical  simulations  of  optical 
confinement  in  dye-sensitized  nanocrystalline  solar 
cells", Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 64, 
pp. 73-83, 2000.  
[40]  J. Ferber, and J. Luther, "Computer simulations of light 
scattering and absorption in dye-sensitized solar cells", 
Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 54, pp. 
265-275, 1998.  
[41]  K. Guo, M. Li, X. Fang, L. Bai, M. Luoshan, F. Zhang, 
and X. Zhao, "Improved properties of dye-sensitized 
solar cells by multifunctional scattering layer of yolk-
shell-like TiO< sub> 2</sub> microspheres", Journal 
of Power Sources, vol. 264, pp. 35-41, 2014.  
[42]  D.B. Menzies, R. Cervini, Y.B. Cheng, G.P. Simon, 
and  L.  Spiccia,  "Nanostructured  ZrO2-coated  TiO2 
electrodes  for  dye-sensitised  solar  cells",  Journal  of 
Sol-Gel Science and Technology, vol. 32, pp. 363-366, 
2004.  
[43]  E. Palomares, J.N. Clifford, S.A. Haque, T. Lutz, and 
J.R.  Durrant,  "Slow  charge  recombination  in  dye-
sensitised  solar  cells  (DSSC)  using  Al2O3  coated 
nanoporous TiO2 films", Chemical Communications, 
pp. 1464-1465, 2002.  
[44]  E. Palomares, J.N. Clifford, S.A. Haque, T. Lutz, and 
J.R.  Durrant,  "Control  of  charge  recombination 
dynamics in dye sensitized solar cells by the use of 
conformally  deposited  metal  oxide blocking layers", 
Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 125, 
pp. 475-482, 2003.  
[45]  S. Ito, P. Liska, P. Comte, R. Charvet, P. Pechy, U. 
Bach, L. Schmidt-Mende, S.M. Zakeeruddin, A. Kay, 
M.K. Nazeeruddin, and M. Grätzel, "Control of dark 
current in photoelectrochemical (TiO2/I--I3-) and dye-
sensitized solar cells", Chemical Communications, pp. 
4351-4353, 2005.  
[46]  Y.  Wang,  H.  Yang,  and  H.  Xu,  "DNA-like  dye-
sensitized solar cells based on TiO2 nanowire-covered 
nanotube  bilayer  film  electrodes", Materials  Letters, 
vol. 64, pp. 164-166, 2010.  
[47]  J.Y. Liao, B.X. Lei, H.Y. Chen, D.B. Kuang, and C.Y. 
Su,  "Oriented  hierarchical  single  crystalline  anatase 
TiO2 nanowire arrays on Ti-foil substrate for efficient 
flexible  dye-sensitized  solar  cells",  Energy  and 
Environmental Science, vol. 5, pp. 5750-5757, 2012.  
[48]  K.  Zhu,  N.R.  Neale,  A.  Miedaner,  and  A.J.  Frank, 
"Enhanced  charge-collection  efficiencies  and  light 
scattering in dye-sensitized solar cells using oriented 
TiO2 nanotubes arrays", Nano Letters, vol. 7, pp. 69-
74, 2007.  
[49]  M. Adachi, Y. Murata, J. Takao, J. Jiu, M. Sakamoto, 
and F.  Wang,  "Highly  efficient  dye-sensitized  solar 
cells with a titania thin-film electrode composed of a 
network  structure  of  single-crystal-like  TiO2 
nanowires  made  by  the  “oriented  attachment” 
mechanism",  Journal  of  the  American  Chemical 
Society, vol. 126, pp. 14943-14949, 2004.  
INTERNATIONAL!JOURNAL!OF!RENEWABLE!ENERGY!RESEARCH!!
Lau"et"al.",!Vol.4,!No.3,!2014"
673!
[50]  B.H. Lee, M.Y. Song, S.Y. Jang, S.M. Jo, S.Y. Kwak, 
and  D.Y.  Kim,  "Charge  transport  characteristics  of 
high  efficiency  dye-sensitized  solar  cells  based  on 
electrospun TiO2 nanorod photoelectrodes", Journal of 
Physical  Chemistry  C,  vol.  113,  pp.  21453-21457, 
2009.  
[51]  C.J.  Lin,  W.Y.  Yu,  and  S.H.  Chien,  "Transparent 
electrodes  of  ordered  opened-end  TiO2-nanotube 
arrays for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells", 
Journal  of  Materials  Chemistry,  vol.  20,  pp.  1073-
1077, 2010.  
[52]  B. Tan, and Y. Wu, "Dye-sensitized solar cells based 
on  anatase  TiO2  nanoparticle/nanowire  composites", 
Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol. 110, pp. 15932-
15938, 2006.  
[53]  Y. Alivov, and Z.Y. Fan, "Efficiency of dye sensitized 
solar  cells  based  on  TiO2  nanotubes  filled  with 
nanoparticles", Applied Physics Letters, vol. 95, 2009.  
[54]  T.-H.  Tsai,  S.-C.  Chiou,  and  S.-M.  Chen, 
"Enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cells by  using 
graphene-TiO2  composites  as  photoelectrochemical 
working electrode", Int. J. Electrochem. Sci, vol. 6, pp. 
3333-3343, 2011.  
[55]  M. Zhu, X. Li, W. Liu, and Y. Cui, "An investigation 
on  the  photoelectrochemical  properties  of  dye-
sensitized  solar  cells  based  on  graphene–TiO2 
composite  photoanodes", Journal  of  Power  Sources, 
vol. 262, pp. 349-355, 2014.  
[56]  S.  Ngamsinlapasathian,  S.  Sakulkhaemaruethai,  S. 
Pavasupree, A. Kitiyanan, T. Sreethawong, Y. Suzuki, 
and  S.  Yoshikawa,  "Highly  efficient  dye-sensitized 
solar  cell  using  nanocrystalline  titania  containing 
nanotube  structure",  Journal  of  Photochemistry  and 
Photobiology  A:  Chemistry,  vol.  164,  pp.  145-151, 
2004.  
[57]  S. Pavasupree, S. Ngamsinlapasathian, M. Nakajima, 
Y.  Suzuki,  and  S.  Yoshikawa,  "Synthesis, 
characterization,  photocatalytic  activity  and  dye-
sensitized 
solar 
cell 
performance 
of 
nanorods/nanoparticles  TiO2  with  mesoporous 
structure",  Journal  of  Photochemistry  and 
Photobiology  A:  Chemistry,  vol.  184,  pp.  163-169, 
2006.  
[58]  P. Sun, X. Zhang, C. Wang, Y. Wei, L. Wang, and Y. 
Liu,  "Rutile  TiO2  nanowire  array  infiltrated  with 
anatase nanoparticles as photoanode for dye-sensitized 
solar cells: Enhanced cell performance via the rutile-
anatase  heterojunction",  Journal  of  Materials 
Chemistry A, vol. 1, pp. 3309-3314, 2013.  
[59]  A.M. Bakhshayesh, M.R. Mohammadi, and D.J. Fray, 
"Controlling electron transport rate and recombination 
process of TiO2 dye-sensitized solar cells by design of 
double-layer films with different arrangement modes", 
Electrochimica Acta, vol. 78, pp. 384-391, 2012.  
[60]  Y.  Qiu,  W.  Chen,  and  S.  Yang,  "Double-layered 
photoanodes  from  variable-size  anatase  TiO2 
nanospindles:  A  candidate  for  high-efficiency  dye-
sensitized  solar  cells",  Angewandte  Chemie  - 
International Edition, vol. 49, pp. 3675-3679, 2010.  
[61]  F. Huang, D. Chen, X.L. Zhang, R.A. Caruso, and Y.B. 
Cheng,  "Dual-function  scattering  layer  of 
submicrometer-sized mesoporous TiO2 beads for high-
efficiency  dyesensitized  solar  cells",  Advanced 
Functional Materials, vol. 20, pp. 1301-1305, 2010.  
[62]  F. Xu, X. Zhang, Y. Wu, D. Wu, Z. Gao, and K. Jiang, 
"Facile  synthesis  of  TiO2  hierarchical  microspheres 
assembled by  ultrathin nanosheets for  dye-sensitized 
solar cells", Journal of  Alloys and Compounds, vol. 
574, pp. 227-232, 2013.  
[63]  J.Y. Liao, B.X. Lei, D.B. Kuang, and C.Y. Su, "Tri-
functional  hierarchical  TiO2  spheres  consisting  of 
anatase nanorods and nanoparticles for high efficiency 
dye-sensitized solar cells", Energy and Environmental 
Science, vol. 4, pp. 4079-4085, 2011.  
[64]  J.Y. Liao, H.P. Lin, H.Y. Chen, D.B. Kuang, and C.Y. 
Su, "High-performance dye-sensitized solar cells based 
on hierarchical yolk-shell anatase TiO2 beads", Journal 
of Materials Chemistry, vol. 22, pp. 1627-1633, 2012.  
[65]  Y.J. Kim, M.H.  Lee, H.J. Kim, G. Lim, Y.S. Choi, 
N.G.  Park,  K.  Kim,  and  W.I.  Lee,  "Formation  of 
highly  efficient  dye-sensitized  solar  cells  by 
hierarchical  pore  generation  with  nanoporous  TiO2 
spheres", Advanced Materials, vol. 21, pp. 3668-3673, 
2009.  
[66]  B.M.  Klahr,  and  T.W.  Hamann,  "Performance 
Enhancement  and  Limitations  of  Cobalt  Bipyridyl 
Redox  Shuttles  in  Dye-Sensitized  Solar  Cells",  The 
Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 113, pp. 14040-
14045, 2009.  
[67]  K.S. Liow, C.S. Sipaut, R.F. Mansa, and J. Dayou, 
"Dye  Sensitized  Solar  Cell  Based  on  Polyethylene 
Glycol/4,4’Diphenylmethane Diisocyanate Copolymer 
Quasi Solid State Electrolyte", Applied Mechanics and 
Materials, vol. 625, pp. 140-143, 2014.  
[68] S.M. Feldt, E.A. Gibson, E. Gabrielsson, L. Sun, G. 
Boschloo, and A. Hagfeldt, "Design of organic dyes 
and  cobalt  polypyridine  redox  mediators  for  high-
efficiency dye-sensitized solar  cells",  Journal  of  the 
American  Chemical  Society,  vol.  132,  pp.  16714-
16724, 2010.  
[69]  T.T.  Trang  Pham,  T.M.  Koh,  K.  Nonomura,  Y.M. 
Lam,  N.  Mathews,  and  S.  Mhaisalkar,  "Reducing 
Mass-Transport  Limitations  in  Cobalt-Electrolyte-
Based  Dye-Sensitized  Solar  Cells  by  Photoanode 
Modification",  ChemPhysChem,  vol.  15,  pp.  1216-
1221, 2014.  
[70]  Y. Duan, N. Fu, Q. Zhang, Y. Fang, X. Zhou, and Y. 
Lin, "Influence of Sn source on  the performance of 
dye-sensitized  solar  cells  based  on  Sn-doped  TiO2 
photoanodes: A strategy for choosing an appropriate 
doping  source",  Electrochimica  Acta,  vol.  107,  pp. 
473-480, 2013.  
INTERNATIONAL!JOURNAL!OF!RENEWABLE!ENERGY!RESEARCH!!
Lau"et"al.",!Vol.4,!No.3,!2014"
674!
[71]  J.K. Lee, and M. Yang, "Progress in light harvesting 
and  charge  injection  of  dye-sensitized  solar  cells", 
Materials  Science  and  Engineering  B:  Solid-State 
Materials  for  Advanced  Technology,  vol.  176,  pp. 
1142-1160, 2011.  
[72]  X. Lü, X. Mou, J. Wu, D. Zhang, L. Zhang, F. Huang, 
F.  Xu, and S.  Huang, "Improved-Performance  Dye-
Sensitized  solar  cells  using  Nb-Doped  TiO2 
electrodes:  Efficient  electron Injection and  transfer", 
Advanced Functional Materials, vol. 20, pp. 509-515, 
2010.  
[73]  M. Yang, D.  Kim, H.  Jha,  K.  Lee,  J.  Paul,  and P. 
Schmuki,  "Nb  doping  of  TiO2  nanotubes  for  an 
enhanced  efficiency  of  dye-sensitized  solar  cells", 
Chemical  Communications,  vol.  47,  pp.  2032-2034, 
2011.  
[74]   H. Tian, L. Hu, C. Zhang, W. Liu, Y. Huang, L. Mo, 
L.  Guo,  J.  Sheng,  and  S.  Dai,  "Retarded  charge 
recombination in dye-sensitized nitrogen-doped TiO2 
solar cells", Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 114, 
pp. 1627-1632, 2010.  
[75]  X. Zhang, F. Liu, Q.-L. Huang, G. Zhou, and Z.-S. 
Wang, "Dye-sensitized W-doped TiO2 solar cells with 
 tunable  conduction  band  and  suppressed  charge 
recombination", The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 
vol. 115, pp. 12665-12671, 2011.  
[76]  Y. Duan, N. Fu, Q. Liu, Y. Fang, X. Zhou, J. Zhang, 
and  Y.  Lin,  "Sn-doped  TiO2  photoanode  for  dye-
sensitized  solar  cells",  The  Journal  of  Physical 
Chemistry C, vol. 116, pp. 8888-8893, 2012.  
[77]  X. Lü, X. Mou, J. Wu, D. Zhang, L. Zhang, F. Huang, 
F.  Xu,  and  S.  Huang,  "Improved!Performance 
Dye!Sensitized  Solar  Cells  Using  Nb!Doped  TiO2 
Electrodes: Efficient Electron Injection and Transfer", 
Advanced Functional Materials, vol. 20, pp. 509-515, 
2010.  
[78]  Y. Xie, N. Huang, Y. Liu, W. Sun, H.F. Mehnane, S. 
You,  L.  Wang,  W.  Liu,  S.  Guo,  and  X.-Z.  Zhao, 
"Photoelectrodes modification by N doping  for  dye-
sensitized  solar  cells", Electrochimica Acta, vol. 93, 
pp. 202-206, 2013.  
[79]  S. Yang, S. Guo, D. Xu, H. Xue, H. Kou, J. Wang, and 
G. Zhu, "Improved efficiency of dye-sensitized solar 
cells applied with F-doped TiO2 electrodes", Journal 
of Fluorine Chemistry, vol. 150, pp. 78-84, 2013.  
[80]  S.C.T. Lau, C.S. Sipaut, J. Dayou, and  R.F.  Mansa, 
"Sol gel synthesized nanosilica as photoanode material 
for  dye  sensitized  solar  cells  (DSSCs)  system", 
Applied Mechanics and Materials, vol. 625, pp. 110-
113, 2014.  
[81]  J.-P. Rino, and N. Studart, "Structural correlations in 
titanium  dioxide",  Physical  Review  B,  vol.  59,  pp. 
6643-6649, 1999.  
[82]  L.E.  Brus,  "Electron–electron  and  electron!hole 
interactions  in  small semiconductor crystallites:  The 
size dependence of the lowest excited electronic state", 
The Journal of  chemical physics, vol. 80, pp. 4403-
4409, 1984.  
[83]  V.A.L. Padavettan, Synthesis And Characterization Of 
Silica Nanoparticles And Their Application As Fillers 
In Silica-Bismaleimide Nanocomposite,  PhD Thesis, 
Universiti Sains Malaysia, 2009. 
[84]  A.  Yelil  Arasi,  M.  Hemma,  P.  Tamilselvi,  and  R. 
Anbarasan,  "Synthesis  and  characterization  of  SiO
2
nanoparticles  by  sol-gel  process",  Indian  Journal  of 
Science, vol. 1, pp. 6-10, 2012.  
[85] A.N.  Trukhin,  L.N.  Skuja,  A.G. Boganov, and V.S. 
Rudenko,  "The  correlation  of  the  7.6  eV  optical 
absorption  band  in  pure  fused  silicon  dioxide  with 
twofold-coordinated  silicon",  Journal  of  Non-
Crystalline Solids, vol. 149, pp. 96-101, 1992.  
[86]  H. Lin, C. Huang, W. Li, C. Ni, S.I. Shah, and Y.-H. 
Tseng, "Size dependency of nanocrystalline TiO2 on 
its  optical  property  and  photocatalytic  reactivity 
exemplified by 2-chlorophenol", Applied Catalysis B: 
Environmental, vol. 68, pp. 1-11, 2006.  
!
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested