convert pdf to tiff programmatically c# : Change security on pdf Library control component .net web page html mvc microsoft_visual_basic_black_book25-part902

Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Command Buttons, Checkboxes, And Option Buttons
Figure 7.6  Setting access characters.
Setting Button Tab Order
To make your buttons more accessible from the keyboard—especially if you’ve got a 
lot of them—you can use the TabStopTabIndex, and Default properties. Here’s 
what those properties do:
  TabStop indicates if this button can accept the focus when the user tabs to it. 
  TabIndex is the index of the current button in the tab order (starts at 0). 
  Default is True for one control on a form only; that control will have the 
focus when the form first appears (by default, so to speak, the default control is 
the control with TabIndex 0). 
When the user presses the Tab key, the focus moves from button to button, ascending 
through the tab order. 
You can arrange the tab order for your buttons with the TabIndex property. For 
example, in Figure 7.7 the first button, at upper left, has the focus (you can tell because 
its border is thickened). Pressing the Tab key will move the focus to the next button, 
and the next, then to the next row, and so on.
Figure 7.7  Using tab-enabled buttons.
TIP:  Another use of tab order is in text-entry forms. If, for example, you have 10 
text boxes in a row that need to be filled out, the user can enter text in the first one, 
press the Tab key to move to the next one, enter text there, press Tab again to move 
to the next text box, and so on. Thoughtfully setting the tab order in such a case can 
make text-oriented forms much easier on your users.
Disabling Buttons
Another problem from the Testing Department concerning your program, 
SuperDuperTextPro. It seems the users are sometimes pressing your Connect To The 
Internet button twice by mistake, confusing the program and causing crashes. Can you 
stop that from happening?
Yes, you can—you can disable the button by setting its Enabled property to False 
when it’s inappropriate to use that button. For example, we’ve disabled all the buttons 
in Figure 7.8. When a button is disabled, it is inaccessible to the user (and it can’t 
accept the focus).
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch07/235-238.html (2 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:58:29 AM]
Change security on pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf password encryption; create pdf the security level is set to high
Change security on pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt password protected pdf; copy locked pdf
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Command Buttons, Checkboxes, And Option Buttons
Figure 7.8  Disabling buttons in a form.
You can also disable buttons at runtime, of course, like this: 
Private Sub Command1_Click()
Command1.Enabled = False
End Sub
TIP:  If you set a button’s Style property to Graphical (Style = 1), you can set the 
button’s DisabledPicture property to a picture, such as from an image file. And 
when the button is disabled, that image will appear in the button. That can be very 
useful to reinforce the fact that the button is disabled—you might have a big X 
appear, for example.
Showing And Hiding Buttons
In the last topic, we saw that we can disable buttons using the Enabled property. 
However, it’s an inefficient use of space (and frustrating to the user) to display a lot of 
disabled buttons. If you have to disable a lot of buttons, you should hide them.
To make a button disappear, just set its Visible property to False. To make it reappear, 
set the Visible property to True. You can set this property at either design time or 
runtime. Here’s how to make a button disappear when you click it (and probably startle 
the user!):
Private Sub Command1_Click()
Command1.Visible = False
End Sub
TIP:  If your program shows and hides buttons, you can rearrange the visible buttons 
to hide any gaps using the buttons’ Move method (the Move method is discussed in 
“Resizing And Moving Buttons From Code” later in this chapter).
Adding Tool Tips To Buttons
Your new word processor, SuperDuperTextPro, is a winner, but the User Interface 
Testing Department has a request—can you add tool tips to the buttons in your 
program? What’s a tool tip, you ask? They say that it’s one of those small yellow boxes 
with explanatory text that appears when you let the mouse cursor rest above an object 
on the screen. “Of course I can add those ,” you say—but can you really?
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch07/235-238.html (3 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:58:29 AM]
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB.NET: Necessary DLLs for PDF Password Edit.
pdf file security; pdf password unlock
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
convert locked pdf to word; decrypt pdf password
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Command Buttons, Checkboxes, And Option Buttons
Yes you can, using the ToolTipText property for the buttons. You just place the text 
you want to appear in the tool tip into the ToolTipText property to create a tool tip for 
the button, and you’re all set. For example, we’ve added a tool tip to the command 
button in Figure 7.9.
Figure 7.9  A button’s tool tip.
You can also set tool tip text at runtime, using the ToolTipText property this way in 
code:
Private Sub Command1_Click()
Command1.ToolTipText = "You already clicked me!"
End Sub
If your buttons change functions as your program runs, changing the buttons’ tool tip 
text can be very helpful to your program’s users. 
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Products |  
Contact Us |  
About Us |  
Privacy  |  
Ad Info  |  
Home 
Use of this site is subject to certain 
Terms & Conditions
Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc.
All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written 
permission of 
EarthWeb is prohibited.
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch07/235-238.html (4 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:58:29 AM]
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
easy as possible to change your PDF file permission settings. You can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security.
pdf security options; change security settings pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
HTML5 Viewer. How to improve PDF document security. PDF Version. • C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports adobe PDF version 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 and 1.7.
change pdf document security; add security to pdf in reader
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Command Buttons, Checkboxes, And Option Buttons
Click Here!
ITKnowledge
home
account 
info
subscribe
login
search
My 
ITKnowledge
FAQ/help
site 
map
contact us
Brief
Full
Advanced
Search
Search Tips 
To access the contents, click the chapter and section titles. 
Visual Basic 6 Black Book 
(Publisher: The Coriolis Group) 
Author(s): Steven Holzner 
ISBN: 1576102831 
Publication Date: 08/01/98 
Bookmark It
Search this book:
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Resizing And Moving Buttons From Code
Your new April Fool’s program has an Exit button, but it moves around and resizes itself, making it a 
moving target for the user to try to hit. Your coworkers think it’s hilarious and they love it. Your boss hates 
it and asks to see you in his cubicle to discuss time management—immediately. 
How do you move buttons and resize them in code? You use the Top, LeftHeight, and Width properties, 
or the Move method. Here’s what those properties hold:
  Left holds the horizontal coordinate of the upper left of the button. 
  Top holds the vertical coordinate of the upper left of the button. 
  Height holds the button’s height. 
  Width holds the button’s width. 
(When setting these properties, remember that the default measurement units in Visual Basic are twips, and 
that the default coordinate system’s origin is at upper left in a form.) 
And here’s how you use the Move method:
Button.Move left, [ top, [ width, [ height ]]]
Let’s see an example; here, we move a command button 500 twips to the right when the user clicks it: 
Private Sub Command1_Click()
Const iIncrement = 500
Command1.Move Command1.Left + iIncrement
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch07/239-243.html (1 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:58:33 AM]
Go!
Keyword
Please Select
Go!
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
cannot print pdf security; secure pdf
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security. We have a privacy
decrypt a pdf; cannot print pdf security
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Command Buttons, Checkboxes, And Option Buttons
End Sub
Adding A Picture To A Button
Your boss (who’s been angling for a promotion) wants the company logo to appear in all the buttons in your 
program. Before you start looking for a new job, take a look at the Visual Basic Picture property.
Using the Picture property, you can load an image into a button—just click the button with the ellipsis (…) 
in the Picture property’s entry in the Properties window and indicate an image file in the Load Picture dialog 
box that opens. That’s not all, however—you also have to set the button’s Style property to Graphical 
(which has a numeric value of 1). We’ve loaded an image into a command button in Figure 7.10.
Figure 7.10  Adding a picture to a button.
When you set checkboxes and option buttons to graphical style, they actually look just like graphical 
command buttons. The only difference is that when you click a graphical checkbox or option button, as 
shown in Figure 7.11, they stay clicked until you click them again (and option buttons still function in 
groups, of course). 
Figure 7.11  A graphical checkbox.
You can also set the Picture property at runtime—but don’t try setting it directly to the name of a file. You 
can only load Visual Basic Picture objects into the Picture property; such objects are returned by the 
LoadPicture() function like this:
Private Sub Command1_Click()
Command1.Picture = LoadPicture("c:\vbbb\picturebuttons\image.bmp")
End Sub
Adding A Down Picture To A Button
Besides adding a simple image to a button, you can add an image that is displayed when the button is down. 
This is more useful with checkboxes and option buttons—which stay down when clicked—than it is with 
command buttons. 
Using the DownPicture property, you can load an image into a button—just click the button with the ellipsis 
(…) in the DownPicture property’s entry in the Properties window, and indicate an image file in the Load 
Picture dialog box that opens.
You also have to set the button’s Style property to Graphical (which has a numeric value of 1). For 
example, we’ve loaded a down image into a command button in Figure 7.12.
Figure 7.12  Adding a down picture to a graphical checkbox.
You can also set the DownPicture property at runtime using the LoadPicture() function:
Private Sub Check1_Click()
Check1.DownPicture = LoadPicture("c:\vbbb\picturebuttons\image2.bmp")
End Sub
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch07/239-243.html (2 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:58:33 AM]
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
create pdf security; decrypt pdf file online
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
with a higher density and data security compared with barcode on a certain page of PDF or Word use barcode relocation API solution to change barcode position
change security settings on pdf; change security settings pdf reader
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Command Buttons, Checkboxes, And Option Buttons
TIP:  You can also add an image to be displayed in a graphical button when it’s disabled by using the 
DisabledPicture property.
Adding Buttons At Runtime
Your new program lets the user add options to customize things, and you want to display a new button for 
each option. Is there a way to add buttons to a Visual Basic program at runtime? 
Yes, there is. You can use the Load statement to load new buttons if they’re part of a control array. To see 
how this works, add a new button to a form, giving it the name, say, “Command”. To make it the first 
member of a control array, set its Index property to 0. Now when the user clicks this button, we can add a 
new button of the same type to the form with Load. Here, we load Command(1), because Command(0) is 
already on the form:
Private Sub Command_Click(Index As Integer)
Load Command(1)
End Sub
The new button is a copy of the original one—which includes the original button’s position—so we move 
the new button so it doesn’t cover the original one: 
Private Sub Command_Click(Index As Integer)
Load Command(1)
Command(1).Move 0, 0
End Sub
Finally, we make the new button visible by setting its Visible property to True:
Private Sub Command_Click(Index As Integer)
Load Command(1)
Command(1).Move 0, 0
Command(1).Visible = True
End Sub
And that’s it—we’ve added a new button to the program at runtime. 
TIP:  You can also remove buttons at runtime by unloading them with Unload.
Passing Buttons To Procedures
You’ve got 200 buttons in your new program, and each one has to be initialized with a long series of code 
statements. Is there some easy way to organize this process? There is. You can pass the buttons to a 
procedure and place the initialization code in that procedure. 
Here’s an example. We can set a button’s caption by passing it to a subroutine named SetCaption() like this:
Private Sub Command1_Click()
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch07/239-243.html (3 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:58:33 AM]
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Command Buttons, Checkboxes, And Option Buttons
SetCaption Command1
End Sub
In the SetCaption() procedure, you just declare the button as a parameter; we’ll name that parameter Button 
and make it of type Control:
Private Sub SetCaption(Button As Control)
End Sub
Now we can refer to the passed button as we would any parameter passed to a procedure, like this: 
Private Sub SetCaption(Button As Control)
Button.Caption = "You clicked me!"
End Sub
The result appears in Figure 7.13—when you click the command button, the SetCaption() subroutine 
changes its caption, as shown.
Figure 7.13  Passing a button to a procedure to change its caption.
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Products |  
Contact Us |  
About Us |  
Privacy  |  
Ad Info  |  
Home 
Use of this site is subject to certain 
Terms & Conditions
Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc.
All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written 
permission of 
EarthWeb is prohibited.
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch07/239-243.html (4 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:58:33 AM]
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Command Buttons, Checkboxes, And Option Buttons
Click Here!
ITKnowledge
home
account 
info
subscribe
login
search
My 
ITKnowledge
FAQ/help
site 
map
contact us
Brief
Full
Advanced
Search
Search Tips 
To access the contents, click the chapter and section titles. 
Visual Basic 6 Black Book 
(Publisher: The Coriolis Group) 
Author(s): Steven Holzner 
ISBN: 1576102831 
Publication Date: 08/01/98 
Bookmark It
Search this book:
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Handling Button Releases
You can tell when a button’s been pushed using its Click event, but can you tell when it’s been 
released? Yes, using the MouseUp event. In fact, buttons support the MouseDownMouseMove
MouseUpKeyDownKeyPress, and KeyUp events.
To determine when a button’s been released, you can just use its MouseUp event this way:
Private Sub Command1_MouseUp(Button As Integer, Shift As Integer,_
X As Single, Y As Single)
MsgBox "You released the button."
End Sub
This can be useful if you want the user to complete some action that has two parts; for example, 
you can use MouseDown to begin changing (for example, incrementing or decrementing) a 
setting of some kind in realtime, giving the user interactive visual feedback, and you can use 
MouseUp to freeze the setting when the user releases the button.
Making A Command Button Into A Cancel Button
When you’re designing dialog boxes, you usually include an OK button and a Cancel button. In 
fact, you can skip the OK button if you have other ways of letting the user select options (for 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch07/244-247.html (1 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:58:35 AM]
Go!
Keyword
Please Select
Go!
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Command Buttons, Checkboxes, And Option Buttons
example, a Finish button or a Yes button), but a Cancel button is just about required in dialog 
boxes. You should always have a Cancel button to let the user close the dialog box in case he has 
opened it by mistake or changed his mind. 
Command buttons do have a Cancel property, and Microsoft recommends that you set it to True if 
you are making a command button into a Cancel button. Only one button can be a Cancel button 
in a form.
However, there doesn’t seem to be much utility in making a command button into a Cancel button. 
There’s nothing special about that button, really—it won’t automatically close a dialog box, for 
example—except for one thing: when the user hits the Esc key, the Cancel button is automatically 
clicked. Using the Esc key is one way users have of closing dialog boxes, but it’s not a very 
compelling reason to have a separate Cancel property for buttons.
Tellingly, the Cancel button in the predefined dialog box that comes with Visual Basic (you can 
add it when you select Project|Add Form) does not have its Cancel property set to True.
Getting A Checkbox’s State
You’ve added all the checkboxes you need to your new program, WinBigSuperCasino, and you’ve 
connected those checkboxes to Click event handlers. But now there’s a problem—when the users 
set the current amount of money they want to bet, you need to check if they’ve exceeded the limit 
they’ve set for themselves. But they set their limit by clicking another checkbox. How can you 
determine which one they’ve checked?
You can see if a checkbox is checked by examining its Value property (Visual Basic does have a 
Checked property, but that’s only for menu items, a fact that has confused more than one 
programmer). Here are the possible Value settings for checkboxes:
  0— Unchecked 
  1— Checked 
  2— Grayed 
Here’s an example; in this case, we will change a command button’s caption if a checkbox, 
Check1, is checked, but not otherwise:
Private Sub Command1_Click()
If Check1.Value = 1 Then
Command1.Caption = "The check mark is checked"
End If
End Sub
Setting A Checkbox’s State
Your new program, SuperSandwichesToGoRightNow , is just about ready, but there’s one hitch. 
You use checkboxes to indicate what items are in a sandwich (cheese, lettuce, tomato, and more) 
to let users custom-build their sandwiches, but you also have a number of specialty sandwiches 
with preset ingredients. When the user selects one of those already-built sandwiches, how do you 
set the ingredients checkboxes to show what’s in them?
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch07/244-247.html (2 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:58:35 AM]
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Command Buttons, Checkboxes, And Option Buttons
You can set a checkbox’s state by setting its Value property to one of the following:
  0—Unchecked 
  1—Checked 
  2—Grayed 
Here’s an example; In this case, we check a checkbox, Check1, from code:
Private Sub Command1_Click()
Check1.Value = 1
End Sub
Here’s another example that uses the Visual Basic Choose() function to toggle a checkbox’s state 
each time the user clicks the command button Command1:
Private Sub Command1_Click()
Check1.Value = Choose(Check1.Value + 1, 1, 0)
End Sub
Grouping Option Buttons Together
When you add option buttons to a form, they are automatically coordinated so that only one option 
button can be selected at a time. If the user selects a new option button, all the other options 
buttons are automatically deselected. But there are times when that’s not convenient. For example, 
you may have two sets of options buttons: days of the week and day of the month. You want the 
user to be able to select one option button in each list. How do you group option buttons together 
into different groups on the same form? 
You can use the frame control to group option buttons together (and, in fact, you can also use 
Picture Box controls). Just draw a frame for each group of option buttons you want on a form and 
add the option buttons to the frames (in the usual way—just select the Option Button tool and 
draw the option buttons in the frames). Each frame of option buttons will act as its own group, and 
the user can select one option button in either group, as shown in Figure 7.14.
Figure 7.14  Grouping option buttons together using frames.
For organizational purposes, and if appropriate, you might consider making the option buttons in 
each group into a control array, which can make handling multiple controls easier. 
Getting An Option Button’s State
You can check if an option button is selected or not with the Value property. Unlike checkboxes, 
which have three settings for the Value property (corresponding to checked, not checked, and 
grayed), option buttons’ Value property only has two settings: True if the button is selected, and 
False if not.
Here’s an example showing how to see whether or not an option button is selected. In this case, 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch07/244-247.html (3 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:58:35 AM]
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested