Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Toolbars, Status Bars, Progress Bars, And Coolbars
Figure 15.24  Using a simple status bar.
TIP:  One reason programmers used to use simple status bars was to show the progress of an 
operation by displaying a succession of dots (or other text) in the status bar’s single long panel. 
However, you can use the progress bar control for that these days—see the next topic in this 
chapter.
Adding A Progress Bar To A Form
The Testing Department is calling again. Why does downloading the 200MB data file your 
program requires take so long? Well, you explain, the Internet is like that. They ask, but can’t 
you at least show the user what progress the downloading operation is making? You take a look 
at the Progress Bar Control tool in the Visual Basic toolbox. Sure, you say, no problem. 
You can use progress bar controls to show the progress of a time-consuming operation. These 
controls display a colored band that can grow (or shrink) as time goes on. To add a progress bar 
to a form, follow these steps:
1.  Select the Project|Components menu item. 
2.  Click the Controls tab in the Components dialog box. 
3.  Select the Microsoft Windows Common Controls item, and click on OK to close the 
Components dialog box. This adds the Progress Bar Control tool to the Visual Basic 
toolbox, as shown in Figure 15.3. 
4.  To place a progress bar in your form, just add it as you would any control, using the 
Progress Bar Control tool. 
5.  Set the progress bar’s Min (default is 0) and Max (default is 100) properties as desired 
to match the range of the operation you’re reporting on. 
Now you’ve got a new progress bar in your form—but how do you use it? See the next topic. 
Using A Progress Bar
Now that you’ve added a progress bar to your program and set its Min and Max properties, how 
do you actually use it to display data? You use a progress bar’s Value property (available only at 
runtime) to specify how much of the progress bar is visible. As you might expect, setting Value 
to Min means none of the progress bar is visible, and setting it to Max means all of it is.
Let’s see an example. In this case, we’ll let the user click a button to display a progress bar 
whose bar lengthens from Min to Max in 10 seconds. Add a progress bar, command button, and 
a timer control to a form now. Set the timer’s Interval property to 1000 (in other words, 1000 
milliseconds, or 1 second). We’ll leave the progress bar’s Min property at 0 and its Max 
property at 100, the defaults.
When the form loads, we disable the timer and set the progress bar’s Value to 0:
Private Sub Form_Load()
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch15/489-493.html (3 of 4) [7/31/2001 9:01:25 AM]
Pdf password encryption - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
convert locked pdf to word doc; creating secure pdf files
Pdf password encryption - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf encryption; decrypt pdf file online
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Toolbars, Status Bars, Progress Bars, And Coolbars
Timer1.Enabled = False
ProgressBar1.Value = 0
End Sub
When the user clicks the command button, we want to start the progress bar, so we enable the 
timer. We also set the progress bar back to 0 (even though we did that when the form loads, the 
user might want to restart the operation, which means he might click the button several times): 
Private Sub Command1_Click()
ProgressBar1.Value = 0
Timer1.Enabled = True
End Sub
Finally, in the Timer event handler, Timer1_Timer, we add a value of 10 to the progress bar’s 
Value property every second. We also check if we’ve filled the progress bar, and if so, disable 
the timer:
Private Sub Timer1_Timer()
ProgressBar1.Value = ProgressBar1.Value + 10
If ProgressBar1.Value >= 100 Then Timer1.Enabled = False
End Sub
That’s all we need—now when the user clicks the command button, we start the progress bar in 
motion, and it goes from 0 to 100 in 10 seconds, as shown in Figure 15.25. 
Figure 15.25  Using a progress bar.
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Products |  
Contact Us |  
About Us |  
Privacy  |  
Ad Info  |  
Home 
Use of this site is subject to certain 
Terms & Conditions
Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc.
All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written 
permission of 
EarthWeb is prohibited.
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch15/489-493.html (4 of 4) [7/31/2001 9:01:25 AM]
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf"; // Create a setting object with user password which is Hello World"); // Set encryption level to AES
change pdf document security properties; add security to pdf file
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
Find your password-protected PDF and upload it. If there is no strong encryption on your file, it will be unlocked and ready to download within seconds.
secure pdf; decrypt pdf online
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Toolbars, Status Bars, Progress Bars, And Coolbars
Click Here!
ITKnowledge
home
account 
info
subscribe
login
search
My 
ITKnowledge
FAQ/help
site 
map
contact us
Brief
Full
Advanced
Search
Search Tips 
To access the contents, click the chapter and section titles. 
Visual Basic 6 Black Book 
(Publisher: The Coriolis Group) 
Author(s): Steven Holzner 
ISBN: 1576102831 
Publication Date: 08/01/98 
Bookmark It
Search this book:
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
The code for this example is located in the progressbar folder on this book’s accompanying CD-
ROM. 
Adding A Coolbar To A Form
Coolbars were first introduced in the Microsoft Internet Explorer, and they are toolbars that 
present controls in bands. The user can adjust these bands by dragging a gripper, which appears at 
left in a band. In this way, users can configure the coolbar by sliding the bands around as they 
want. 
To add a coolbar control to a form, follow these steps:
1.  Select the Project|Components menu item. 
2.  Click the Controls tab in the Components dialog box. 
3.  Select the Microsoft Windows Common Controls-3 item, and click on OK to close the 
Components dialog box. This adds the Coolbar Control tool to the Visual Basic toolbox, as 
shown in Figure 15.3. 
4.  To place a coolbar in your form, just add it as you would any control, using the Coolbar 
Control tool. 
Now that you’ve added a coolbar to your form, maybe you’ll need to align it in that form? See the 
next topic for the details. 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch15/493-497.html (1 of 4) [7/31/2001 9:01:28 AM]
Go!
Keyword
Please Select
Go!
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a setting object with user password which is PasswordSetting("Hello World") ' Set encryption level to
secure pdf; change pdf security settings reader
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf"; // Create a setting object with user password "Hello World". Hello World"); // Set encryption level to
decrypt pdf password online; create secure pdf online
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Toolbars, Status Bars, Progress Bars, And Coolbars
Aligning Coolbars In A Form
Now that you’ve added a coolbar to your form, how do you align it to the top, bottom, or wherever 
you want to place it? You use the Align property, setting it to one of these values:
  vbAlignNone—0 (the default) 
  vbAlignTop—1 
  vbAlignBottom—2 
  vbAlignLeft—3 
  vbAlignRight—4 
Now that you’ve added a coolbar to your form and set its alignment as you want, how do you add 
bands to that coolbar? See the next topic for the details. 
Adding Bands To A Coolbar
The controls in a coolbar are usually organized into bands (and note that those controls can 
themselves contain controls, as when you place toolbars in a band). To add a band to a coolbar, 
just follow these steps: 
1.  Right-click the coolbar and select the Properties item in the menu that appears. 
2.  Click the Bands tab in the coolbar’s property pages, as shown in Figure 15.26. 
Figure 15.26  The coolbar property pages.
3.  Add new bands to the coolbar using the Insert Band button. 
4.  When finished, close the property pages by clicking on OK. 
You can also add a band to a coolbar at runtime with its Bands collection, because that collection 
supports the usual collection methods Add and Remove. For example, here’s how we add a new 
band to a coolbar at runtime:
Private Sub Command1_Click()
Dim band5 As Band
Set band5 = CoolBar1.Bands.Add()
End Sub
Now that you’ve added bands to a coolbar, how do you install controls in those bands? Take a 
look at the next topic to get the details. 
Adding Controls To Coolbar Bands
You add controls to coolbar bands by setting the band’s Child property. The Child property can 
only hold one child control, which you might think limits the power of coolbars, but in fact, that 
control can be a complete toolbar. If you fill a coolbar’s bands with toolbar controls, users can 
arrange and slide those toolbars around as they like.
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch15/493-497.html (2 of 4) [7/31/2001 9:01:28 AM]
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a password setting object with user password "Hello World Hello World") ' Set encryption level to
pdf secure; copy text from encrypted pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
NET class. Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Support PDF encryption in VB.NET class applications. A professional
decrypt pdf without password; decrypt a pdf file online
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Toolbars, Status Bars, Progress Bars, And Coolbars
To add a control to a coolbar band, follow these steps:
1.  Add the control (such as a toolbar) you want to place in a band to the coolbar by 
drawing it inside the coolbar. 
2.  Right-click the coolbar and select the Properties item in the menu that appears. 
3.  Click the Bands tab in the coolbar’s property pages, as shown in Figure 15.27. 
Figure 15.27  Adding a toolbar to a coolbar band.
4.  Select the band you want to work with. 
5.  Set the band’s Child property to the control you want to add to that band, such as 
Toolbar1 in Figure 15.27. 
6.  Close the coolbar’s property pages by clicking on OK. 
You can also set a band’s Child property at runtime, as in this example where we set the control in 
the coolbar’s first band to Toolbar1:
Private Sub Command1_Click()
Set CoolBar1.Bands(1).Child = Toolbar1
End Sub
Handling Coolbar Control Events
You’ve set up the coolbar you want and placed a few toolbars in the various bands of that coolbar. 
Now how do you handle button clicks in those toolbars (or other controls you’ve place in a 
coolbar’s bands)? 
Handling events from controls in coolbar bands is easy—just connect event handlers to those 
controls as you normally would (in other words, if they weren’t in a coolbar). Here’s an example 
where we’ve added a toolbar, Toolbar1, to a coolbar. You can add buttons to the toolbar as you 
would normally—just open the toolbar’s property pages and use the Insert Button button. To 
handle Click events for those button, you just double-click the toolbar’s buttons at design time, 
which opens the matching Click event handler:
Private Sub Toolbar1_ButtonClick(ByVal Button As ComctlLib.Button)
End Sub
Then you just proceed as you would in a normal toolbar, such as adding this code where we 
indicate to users which button they’ve clicked: 
Private Sub Toolbar1_ButtonClick(ByVal Button As ComctlLib.Button)
MsgBox "You clicked button " & Button.Index
End Sub
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch15/493-497.html (3 of 4) [7/31/2001 9:01:28 AM]
VB.NET Word: How to Convert Word Document to PNG Image Format in
and document formats, including converting Word to PDF in VB protection by utilizing the modern Advanced Encryption Standard that converts a password to a
change security settings pdf; create encrypted pdf
C# Image: How to Annotate Image with Freehand Line in .NET Project
Tutorials on how to add freehand line objects to PDF, Word and TIFF SDK; Protect sensitive image information with redaction and encryption annotation objects;
create pdf the security level is set to high; copy text from locked pdf
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Toolbars, Status Bars, Progress Bars, And Coolbars
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Products |  
Contact Us |  
About Us |  
Privacy  |  
Ad Info  |  
Home 
Use of this site is subject to certain 
Terms & Conditions
Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc.
All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written 
permission of 
EarthWeb is prohibited.
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch15/493-497.html (4 of 4) [7/31/2001 9:01:28 AM]
C# Image: C#.NET Code to Add HotSpot Annotation on Images
Protect sensitive information with powerful redaction and encryption annotation objects to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf security remover; change pdf document security
C# Image: Add Watermark to Images Within RasterEdge .NET Imaging
powerful and reliable color reduction products, image encryption decryption, and even to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
decrypt pdf online; creating secure pdf files
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Image Lists, Tree Views, List Views, And Tab Strips
ITKnowledge
home
account 
info
subscribe
login
search
My 
ITKnowledge
FAQ/help
site 
map
contact us
Brief
Full
Advanced
Search
Search Tips 
To access the contents, click the chapter and section titles. 
Visual Basic 6 Black Book 
(Publisher: The Coriolis Group) 
Author(s): Steven Holzner 
ISBN: 1576102831 
Publication Date: 08/01/98 
Bookmark It
Search this book:
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Chapter 16
Image Lists, Tree Views, List Views, And 
Tab Strips 
If you need an immediate solution to: 
Adding An Image List To A Form 
Adding Images To Image Lists 
Using The Images In Image Lists 
Setting Image Keys In An Image List 
Adding A Tree View To A Form 
Selecting Tree View Styles 
Adding Nodes To A Tree View 
Adding Subnodes To A Tree View 
Adding Images To A Tree View 
Expanding And Collapsing Nodes (And Setting Node Images To Match) 
Handling Tree View Node Clicks 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch16/499-504.html (1 of 5) [7/31/2001 9:01:30 AM]
Go!
Keyword
Please Select
Go!
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Image Lists, Tree Views, List Views, And Tab Strips
Adding A List View To A Form 
Adding Items To A List View 
Adding Icons To List View Items 
Adding Small Icons To List View Items 
Selecting The View Type In List Views 
Adding Column Headers To A List View 
Adding Column Fields To A List View 
Handling List View Item Clicks 
Handling List View Column Header Clicks 
Adding A Tab Strip To A Form 
Inserting Tabs Into A Tab Strip Control 
Setting Tab 
Setting Tab Images 
Using A Tab Strip To Display Other Controls 
Handling Tab Clicks 
In Depth
In this chapter, we’re going to take a look at image list controls and some of the 
controls that use image lists: tree views, list views, and tab strips. These controls are 
part of the Windows common controls package and are being used more and more 
frequently in Windows programs. 
We’ll get an overview of each control before tackling the programming issues. You 
add all the controls in this chapter to the Visual Basic toolbox by selecting the 
Project|Components menu item, clicking the Controls tab in the dialog box that opens, 
selecting the entry marked Windows Common Controls, and clicking on OK to close 
the Components dialog box.
Image Lists
Image list controls are invisible controls that serve one purpose: to hold images that are 
used by other controls. Usually, you add images to an image list control at design time, 
using the Insert Picture button in the control’s property pages. You can also add images 
to an image list at runtime, using the Add method of its internal image collection, 
ListImages.
To use the images in the image list, you usually associate the image list with a 
Windows common control (which has an ImageList property). For each item in the 
common control, such as a tab in a tab strip control, you can then specify either an 
index into the image lists’ ListImages collection or an image’s key value to associate 
that image with the item.
You can also reach the images in an image list with the ListImages collection’s 
Picture property. For example, if you wanted to use an image list with a control that’s 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch16/499-504.html (2 of 5) [7/31/2001 9:01:30 AM]
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Image Lists, Tree Views, List Views, And Tab Strips
not a Windows common control, such as a picture box, you can assign the first image 
in the image control to that picture box this way:
Picture1.Picture = ImageList1.ListImages(1).Picture
The Image List Control tool appears in the Visual Basic toolbox in Figure 16.1 at 
bottom, on the right. 
Figure 16.1  The Image List Control tool.
Tree Views
If you’ve used the Windows Explorer, you’re familiar with tree views. Tree views 
present data in a hierarchical way, such as the view of directories that appears in the 
tree view at left in the Windows Explorer, as shown in Figure 16.2. 
Figure 16.2  The Windows Explorer.
Trees are composed of cascading branches of nodes , and each node usually consists of 
an image (set with the Image property) and a label (set with the Text property). Images 
for the nodes are supplied by an image list control associated with the tree view 
control.
A node can be expanded or collapsed, depending on whether or not the node has child 
nodes. At the topmost level are root nodes, and each root node can have any number of 
child nodes. Each node in a tree is actually a programmable Node object, which 
belongs to the Nodes collection. As with other collections, each member of the 
collection has a unique Index and Key property that allows you to access the properties 
of the node.
The Tree View Control tool is the thirteenth tool down on the right in Figure 16.3.
Figure 16.3  The Tree View Control tool.
List Views
The list view control displays, as its name implies, lists of items. You can see a list 
view at right in the Windows Explorer in Figure 16.2. There, the list view is displaying 
a list of files. Each item in a list view control is itself a ListItem object and can have 
both text and an image associated with it. The ListItem objects are stored in the list 
view’s ListItems collection.
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch16/499-504.html (3 of 5) [7/31/2001 9:01:30 AM]
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:Image Lists, Tree Views, List Views, And Tab Strips
List views can display data in four different view modes:
  Icon mode—Can be manipulated with the mouse, allowing the user to drag 
and drop and rearrange objects. 
  SmallIcon mode—Allows more ListItem objects to be viewed. Like the Icon 
view mode, objects can be rearranged by the user. 
  List mode—Presents a sorted view of the ListItem objects. 
  Report mode—Presents a sorted view, with sub-items, allowing extra 
information to be displayed. 
The list view in the Windows Explorer in Figure 16.2 is displaying files in Report view 
mode (which is the only mode that has columns and column headers). In this mode, 
you add sub-items to each item, and the text in those sub-items will appear under the 
various column headings. 
You usually associate two image list controls with a list view: one to hold the icons for 
the Icon view mode, and one to hold small icons for the other three modes. The size of 
the icons you use is determined by the image list control (the available sizes are 16 × 
16, 32 × 32, 48 × 48, and Custom).
The List View Control tool is the fourteenth control down on the left in Figure 16.4.
Figure 16.4  The List View Control tool.
Tab Strips
A tab strip control presents the user with a row (or rows) of tabs that acts like the 
dividers in a notebook or the labels on a group of file folders. Like an increasing 
number of other controls (such as coolbars and tree views), tab strips represent one of 
Microsoft’s attempts to compact data into less and less of the screen (because there’s 
getting to be more and more data). Using tab strips, the user can click a tab and see a 
whole new panel of data, like opening a file folder. In fact, we’ve already used tab 
strips in many parts of this book already to set Visual Basic options or to include 
ActiveX controls in our programs. 
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch16/499-504.html (4 of 5) [7/31/2001 9:01:30 AM]
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested