convert pdf to tiff programmatically c# : Decrypt pdf online software Library dll windows asp.net html web forms microsoft_visual_basic_black_book7-part951

Visual Basic 6 Black Book:The Visual Basic Development Environment
ITKnowledge
home
account 
info
subscribe
login
search
My 
ITKnowledge
FAQ/help
site 
map
contact us
Brief
Full
Advanced
Search
Search Tips 
To access the contents, click the chapter and section titles. 
Visual Basic 6 Black Book 
(Publisher: The Coriolis Group) 
Author(s): Steven Holzner 
ISBN: 1576102831 
Publication Date: 08/01/98 
Bookmark It
Search this book:
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Form Designers And Code Windows
The last parts of the IDE that we’ll take a look at in our overview are form designers 
and code windows, which appear in the center of Figure 2.8. (The form designer 
displays the current form under design, complete with command button, and the code 
window displays the code for the Command1_Click() procedure.)
Figure 2.8  A form designer and code window.
Form designers are really just windows in which a particular form appears. You can 
place controls into a form simply by drawing them after clicking the corresponding 
control’s tool in the toolbox. 
Code windows are similarly easy to understand: you just place the code you want to 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch02/048-054.html (1 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:57:09 AM]
Go!
Keyword
Please Select
Go!
Decrypt pdf online - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
create pdf the security level is set to high; copy text from encrypted pdf
Decrypt pdf online - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf security remover; change security settings pdf
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:The Visual Basic Development Environment
attach to an object in the code window (to open an object’s code in the code window, 
just double-click that object). There are two drop-down list boxes at the top of the code 
window: the left list lets you select the object to add code to, and the right list lets you 
select the procedure to add (all the methods the object supports appear in this list).
That completes our overview of the IDE. Let’s get into the actual meat of the chapter 
now, task by task.
Immediate Solutions
Selecting IDE Colors, Fonts, And Font Sizes
The Visual Basic IDE comes with all kinds of preset colors—blue for keywords, green 
for comments, black for other code, and so on. But as when you move into a new 
house, you might want to do your own decorating. Visual Basic allows you to do that. 
Just open the Options box by clicking the Options item in the Visual Basic Tools menu, 
and click the Editor Format tab, as shown in Figure 2.9. 
Figure 2.9  Selecting IDE colors.
Here are the text items whose colors you can select: 
  Normal Text 
  Selection Text 
  Syntax Error Text 
  Execution Point Text 
  Breakpoint Text 
  Comment Text 
  Keyword Text 
  Identifier Text 
  Bookmark Text 
  Call Return Text 
To set a particular type of text’s color and background color, just select the appropriate 
color from the drop-down list boxes labeled Foreground and Background, and click on 
OK. You can also set text font and font sizes in the same way—just specify the new 
setting and click on the OK button to customize the text the way you want it. 
Aligning, Sizing, And Spacing Multiple Controls
Visual Basic is very...well...visual, and that includes the layout of controls in your 
programs. If you’ve got a number of controls that should be aligned in a straight line, it 
can be murder to have to squint at the screen, aligning those controls in a line down to 
the very last pixel. Fortunately, there’s an easier way to do it:
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch02/048-054.html (2 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:57:09 AM]
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Allow to decrypt PDF password and open a password protected document in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms
change security settings on pdf; pdf security password
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:The Visual Basic Development Environment
1.  Hold down the Ctrl key and click all the controls you want to align. 
2.  Make sure you have one control in the correct position, and click that one 
last. 
Sizing handles, the eight small boxes that you can grasp with the mouse to resize a 
control, appear around all the clicked controls. The sizing handles appear hollow 
around all but the last control you clicked, as shown in Figure 2.10; the last control you 
clicked has solid sizing handles, and it will act as the key control. The other controls 
will be aligned using this key control’s position.
To align all the selected controls to the same left, right, or center position of the key 
control, you continue with these steps:
3.  Select the Align item in the Format menu, opening the Align submenu, as 
shown in Figure 2.10. 
Figure 2.10  Aligning new controls.
4.  Select the type of alignment you want in the Align submenu: align the left, 
the center, the right, the top, the middle, or the bottom edges of the controls with 
the key control. 
5.  While the controls are still collectively selected, you can move them, if you 
like, as a group to any new location now that they are aligned as you want them. 
To size all selected controls the same as the key control, follow Steps 1 and 2, and then 
continue this way:
3.  Select the Make Same Size item in the Format menu, opening that submenu, 
as shown in Figure 2.11. 
Figure 2.11  Sizing new controls.
4.  Choose the appropriate item in the Make Same Size submenu to size the 
controls as you want them: matching the key control’s width, height, or both. 
To space multiple controls vertically or horizontally, follow Steps 1 and 2 and then 
continue:
3.  Select the Horizontal Spacing or Vertical Spacing item in the Format menu, 
opening that submenu, as shown in Figure 2.12. 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch02/048-054.html (3 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:57:09 AM]
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:The Visual Basic Development Environment
Figure 2.12  Spacing controls.
4.  To space the controls horizontally or vertically, select one of the items in the 
corresponding submenu: 
  Make Equal—Sets the spacing to the average of the current spacing 
  Increase—Increases by one grid line 
  Decrease—Decreases by one grid line 
  Remove—Removes spacing 
The Design Time Grid
Spacing depends on grid lines. The grid is made up of the array of dots you see on a 
form at design time. This grid is to help you place controls on a form, and by default, 
controls are aligned to the grid (which means they are sized to fit along vertical and 
horizontal lines of dots). You can change the grid units (in twips) in the Options box 
when you click the General tab, as shown in Figure 2.13. (To open the Options box, 
select the Options item in the Tools menu.) 
Figure 2.13  Modifying the grid settings.
Besides setting the units of the grid, you can also specify whether or not controls must 
be aligned to the grid by checking the Align Controls To Grid checkbox. 
Setting A Startup Form Or Procedure
Visual Basic programs mean windows, right? Not necessarily. Visual Basic programs 
do not need to have any windows at all, in fact. That case is a little extreme, but there 
are times when you don’t want to start your program with code in a form. For example, 
you might want to display a flash screen when your program first starts, without 
waiting for the first (possibly complex) form to load, and then switch to the form when 
it does load. 
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Products |  
Contact Us |  
About Us |  
Privacy  |  
Ad Info  |  
Home 
Use of this site is subject to certain 
Terms & Conditions
Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc.
All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written 
permission of 
EarthWeb is prohibited.
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch02/048-054.html (4 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:57:09 AM]
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:The Visual Basic Development Environment
ITKnowledge
home
account 
info
subscribe
login
search
My 
ITKnowledge
FAQ/help
site 
map
contact us
Brief
Full
Advanced
Search
Search Tips 
To access the contents, click the chapter and section titles. 
Visual Basic 6 Black Book 
(Publisher: The Coriolis Group) 
Author(s): Steven Holzner 
ISBN: 1576102831 
Publication Date: 08/01/98 
Bookmark It
Search this book:
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Creating A Form-Free Startup Procedure
To start a program from code not in any form, you add a subroutine named Main() to 
your program. Follow these steps:
1.  Select the Properties item in the Project menu to open the Project Properties 
box, as shown in Figure 2.14. 
Figure 2.14  The Project Properties box.
2.  Click the General tab in the Project Properties box (if it’s not already 
selected), select Sub Main in the Startup Object drop-down list, and click on 
OK. 
3.  Select Add Module in the Project menu, and double-click the Module icon in 
the Add Module box that opens. 
4.  Add this code to the new module’s (General) section in the code window: 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch02/054-059.html (1 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:57:11 AM]
Go!
Keyword
Please Select
Go!
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:The Visual Basic Development Environment
Sub Main()
End Sub
5.  Place the code you want in the Main() subroutine. 
Selecting The Startup Form
On the other hand, you might have a number of forms in a project—how do you 
specify which one is displayed first? You do that with the General tab of the Project 
Properties box, just as we’ve added a Main() subroutine to our program.
To specify the startup form for a project, just open the Project Properties box as we’ve 
done in the previous section and select the appropriate form in the Startup Object box, 
as shown in Figure 2.15. Now when your program starts, that form will act as the 
startup form.
Figure 2.15  Setting a project’s startup form.
Using Visual Basic Predefined Forms, Menus, And Projects
You’re designing a new program, and you want a form with a complete File menu on 
it. You don’t want to use the Application Wizard, because that add-in would redesign 
your whole project for you. Rather than designing a complete standard File menu from 
scratch, there’s an easier way: you can use one of the predefined menus that come with 
Visual Basic. 
To add one of the predefined Visual Basic menus, follow these steps:
1.  Select the form you want to add the menu to by clicking it with the mouse. 
2.  Open the Visual Component Manager from the Tools menu. If the Visual 
Component Manager is not already loaded into Visual Basic, open the Add-In 
Manager in the Add-Ins menu, click the box labeled Visual Component 
Manager, and close the Add-In Manager. If your version of Visual Basic does 
not come with the Visual Component Manager, refer to the discussion after 
these steps. 
3.  Open the Visual Basic folder in the Visual Component Manager. 
4.  Open the Templates folder in the Visual Basic folder. 
5.  Open the Menus folder in the Templates folder, as shown in Figure 2.16. 
Figure 2.16  Opening the Menus folder in the Visual Component Manager.
6.  Select the type of menu you want and double-click it. These are the available 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch02/054-059.html (2 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:57:11 AM]
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:The Visual Basic Development Environment
menus: 
  Edit menu 
  File menu 
  Help menu 
  View menu 
  Window menu 
7.  The new menu will be added to the form you selected, as shown in Figure 
2.17. 
Figure 2.17  Adding a predefined Visual Basic menu to a form.
Besides menus, you can add a whole selection of predefined forms to your projects by 
finding the Forms folder in the Templates folder in the Visual Component Manager. 
Here are the available forms, ready to be added to your project with a click of the 
mouse: 
  Blank forms 
  About dialog boxes (two types) 
  Addin forms 
  Browser forms 
  Data grid forms 
  Dialog forms 
  Tip forms 
  Log-in forms 
  ODBC log-in forms 
  Options forms 
  Query forms 
As you’ll see in the Visual Component Manager’s Templates folder, you can add the 
following pre-defined elements to a Visual Basis Project: 
  Classes 
  Code procedures 
  Control sets 
  Forms 
  MDI forms 
  Menus 
  Modules 
  Project templates 
  Property pages 
  User controls 
  User documents 
After you’ve created components like these in Visual Basic, you can add them to other 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch02/054-059.html (3 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:57:11 AM]
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:The Visual Basic Development Environment
projects using the Visual Component Manager—in fact, reusing components like this is 
one of the things professional programmers and programming teams do best. 
If You Don’t Have The Visual Component Manager
If your version of Visual Basic does not come with the Visual Component Manager, 
you can still add many predefined components to a project, including forms, MDI 
forms, modules, class modules, user controls, and property pages. For example, to add 
a predefined form to your project, just select Add Form from the Project menu, opening 
the Add Form dialog box, as shown in Figure 2.18. 
Figure 2.18  The Add Form dialog box.
As you can see, the predefined forms are here, so you can add them to your project 
with a simple click of the mouse. 
Adding menus is a little different here, because you actually add a whole new form 
with that menu, instead of adding that menu to an already-existing form. For example, 
to add a new form with a File menu already in place, click the Existing tab in the Add 
Form dialog box, click the Menus folder, and double-click the Filemenu.frm entry. 
This adds a new form to your project, complete with File menu.
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Products |  
Contact Us |  
About Us |  
Privacy  |  
Ad Info  |  
Home 
Use of this site is subject to certain 
Terms & Conditions
Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc.
All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written 
permission of 
EarthWeb is prohibited.
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch02/054-059.html (4 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:57:11 AM]
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:The Visual Basic Development Environment
ITKnowledge
home
account 
info
subscribe
login
search
My 
ITKnowledge
FAQ/help
site 
map
contact us
Brief
Full
Advanced
Search
Search Tips 
To access the contents, click the chapter and section titles. 
Visual Basic 6 Black Book 
(Publisher: The Coriolis Group) 
Author(s): Steven Holzner 
ISBN: 1576102831 
Publication Date: 08/01/98 
Bookmark It
Search this book:
Previous
Table of Contents
Next
Setting A Project’s Version Information
Five years from now, a user stumbles across your EXE file, which you’ve conveniently 
named CDU2000.exe. This makes perfect sense to you—what else would you name the 
EXE file for a utility named Crop Dusting Utility 2000? However, the user is a little 
puzzled. How can he get more information directly from the EXE file to know just 
what CDU2000.exe does? He can do that by interrogating the file’s version 
information.
A program’s version information includes more than just the version number of the 
program; it also can include the name of the company that makes the software, general 
comments to the user, legal copyrights, legal trademarks, the product name, and the 
product description. All these items are available to the user, and if you’re releasing 
your software commercially, you should fill these items in. Here’s how you do it:
1.  Open the Project Properties box in Visual Basic now by selecting the 
Properties item in the Project menu. 
2.  Select the Make tab, as shown in Figure 2.19. 
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch02/059-063.html (1 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:57:13 AM]
Go!
Keyword
Please Select
Go!
Visual Basic 6 Black Book:The Visual Basic Development Environment
Figure 2.19  Setting a project’s version information.
3.  Fill in the information you want, including the program’s version number, 
product name, and so on. 
4.  Create the EXE file, which in our case is CDU2000.exe, using the Make 
CDU2000.exe item in the File menu. 
5.  To look at the version information in CDU2000.exe, find that file in the 
Windows Explorer and right-click the file, selecting Properties from the pop-up 
menu that opens. As you can see in Figure 2.20, our version 
information—including the name of the product—appears in the Properties box. 
Figure 2.20  Reading a program’s version information.
Sometimes, version information is all that users have to go on when they encounter 
your program, so be sure to include it before releasing that product. 
Setting An EXE File’s Name And Icon
You’re about to release your software commercially, but you suddenly realize that 
Project1.exe might not be the best name for your product’s executable file. The 
stockholders’ meeting is in five minutes—how can you change your EXE file’s name? 
To set the EXE file’s name, you just set the project’s name. Here’s how you do it:
1.  Select the Properties item in the Project menu to open the Project Properties 
box, as shown in Figure 2.21. 
Figure 2.21  Setting a project’s name.
2.  Select the General tab in the Project Properties box (if it’s not already 
selected). 
3.  Enter the name of the project you want to use, such as CDU2000 in Figure 
2.21. 
4.  The project’s name will become the name of the EXE file when you create it 
with the Make CDU2000.exe item in the File menu. 
Now you’ve named your EXE file, but how do you set the program’s icon that will 
appear in Windows? The program’s icon is just the icon of the startup form, and you 
can set that by setting that form’s Icon property in the Properties window. If you have a 
new icon in ICO file format, you can load that icon right into that form by setting the 
form’s Icon  property to the ICO file name.
file:///E|/Program%20Files/KaZaA/My%20Shared%...Basic%20-%20%20Black%20Book/ch02/059-063.html (2 of 4) [7/31/2001 8:57:13 AM]
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested