pdf to tiff c# code : Add signature to pdf acrobat reader SDK software project winforms windows .net UWP publicdiplo2-part1430

19 
‘And finally, there is much in our own life, here in this country, that needs 
early containment. It could, in fact, be said that the first thing we Americans 
need to learn to contain is, in some ways, ourselves’.
41
Containment, as has been noted, can be both strategic and tactical. It is 
positional but also processual. It is both long-term and short-term. The basic 
idea  of  it  is  classically  expressed  in  Kennan’s  famous  observation—and 
prescription—of 1947 that ‘Soviet pressure against the free institutions of the 
Western world is something that can be contained by the adroit and vigilant 
application of counter-force at a series of constantly shifting geographical and 
political points, corresponding to the shifts and maneuvers of Soviet policy, 
but which cannot be charmed or talked out of existence’—or, one might add, 
simply overcome militarily.
42
Professor Kennan was later at pains to explain 
that ‘containment’, as he intended it, was not primarily a military concept.
43
It 
was political, and economic. And, he might have added, public-diplomatic as 
well. 
Containment via public diplomacy, like containment by military action or 
economic measures, also can be strategic and tactical. To stop the spread of 
terror ‘with a global reach’ is now what might be considered a new grand 
strategy for  the United States, and perhaps  even  for certain of its  allies, 
notably the United Kingdom. In that remarkable document, The National 
Security Strategy of the United States of America, the statement is made: ‘We 
will cooperate with other nations to deny, contain, and curtail our enemies’ 
efforts to acquire dangerous technologies. And, as a matter of common sense 
and self-defense, America will act against such emerging threats before they 
are fully formed.’
44
This  early-reactive,  even  pre-emptive,  approach  would  have  an 
informational and ideological aspect as well.  The character of much of the 
current communications effort is, frankly, propagandistic—and reminiscent of 
‘informational’ programs carried out by the U.S. government in the 1950s. 
The National Security Strategy states: ‘We will also wage a war of ideas to win 
41)  Kennan, ‘The Origins of Containment’, 30. 
42)  George F. Kennan, American Diplomacy, 1900-1950 (New York: Mentor Books, 
1952), 99.  
43)  Kennan, ‘The Origins of Containment’, 26: ‘So when I used the word containment 
with respect to that country [Soviet Russia] in 1946, what I had in mind was not at all 
the averting of the sort of military threat people are talking about today.’ See also 
George F. Kennan, Memoirs, 1925-1950 (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1967), 
chap. 15 ‘The X-Article’. 
44)  The National Security Strategy of the United States of America, The White House, 17 
September 2002, http://www.whitehouse.gov/nsc/nss.html.  
Add signature to pdf acrobat reader - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
create signature from pdf; pdf signature stamp
Add signature to pdf acrobat reader - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
adding a signature to a pdf in preview; export pdf sign in
20 
the battle against terrorism.’ This would include ‘using effective public 
diplomacy to promote the free flow of information and ideas to kindle the 
hopes and aspirations of freedom of those in societies ruled by the sponsors of 
global terrorism.’
45
At the purely tactical level, some controversial measures are being taken. 
Some of this informational activity is largely just reactive, aimed at containing 
rumors rather than spreading truth of a higher order. The machinery that has 
been set up for this is impressive. ‘They call themselves a rapid reaction 
force’, rather dramatically began an article about it in Der Spiegel: 
At 4:30 every morning, they report for work in a windowless room on the second 
floor of the State Department in Washington. The televisions in the room are all 
set to Arab broadcasters—part of the daily search for reports coming out of the 
Islamic world that could spell danger for the United States. 
The team’s job is to correct false reports and wild myths as fast as possible—
corrections which are then posted on the State Department Web site. And some 
of the conspiracy theories are whoppers—like the one claiming the US knew 
about the catastrophic tsunami in Asia but didn’t put out a warning in time, or 
the one about US troops in Iraq selling the organs of dead Iraqis.
‘But correcting urban myths’, the Spiegel article went on to say, ‘is just a tiny 
cog in that part of Washington’s massive PR apparatus aimed at improving 
the US image in the Muslim world.’ Its author lists, among other activities, 
the financing of radio and television stations, providing help to build Islamic 
centers, and giving payments to spiritual leaders. ‘Friendly contact with the 
Islamic  world’,  is  the  secret  marching  order  Bush  has  given  the  State 
Department,  the  Pentagon  and  the  CIA  in  carrying  out  the  largest 
propaganda  offensive  since  the  end  of  the  Cold  War.’  The  program  is 
estimated to be costing ‘billions of dollars’.
46
Much of this money is being spent, directly and also indirectly, by the 
Pentagon and the U.S. military under the name of ‘information operations’. 
In 2003 Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld approved an ‘Information Operations 
Roadmap’, now declassified. This came after the Department of Defense’s 
Office of Strategic Influence was dismantled following news reports that it 
would plant false news items in the foreign press. A portion of that effort has 
45)  Ibid. 
46)  Georg Mascolo, ‘US Dollars for Islamic Goodwill’, Spiegel Online, 21 February 2006, 
http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiegel/0,1518,402130,00.html. See also David W. 
Cloud and Jeff Gerth, ‘Muslim Scholars Were Paid to Aid U.S. Propaganda’, The New 
York Times, 2 January 2006. 
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print
adding signature to pdf document; adding signature to pdf files
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
adding signature to pdf file; create pdf signature stamp
21 
been  outsourced  to  a  private  firm,  the  Lincoln  Group,  which  has  been 
reported to have a dozen U.S. government contracts totaling 130 million 
dollars. The firm works in Iraq, Afghanistan, the United Arab Emirates, and 
Jordan, and employs about two hundred persons. What it does, according to 
Lincoln  Group  president  Paige  Craig,  is  not  propaganda.  ‘We  call  it 
“influence”’,  he  said.
47
Secretary  Rumsfeld  testily  defends  the  ‘use  of 
nontraditional means to provide accurate information to the Iraqi people’ in 
the face of an ‘aggressive campaign of disinformation’. He protests:  
Yet this has been portrayed as inappropriate; for example, the allegations of 
someone in the military hiring a contractor, and the contractor allegedly paying 
someone to print a story—a true story—but paying to print a story. The effect is 
that ‘the resulting explosion of critical press stories then causes everything, all 
activity, all initiative, to stop, just frozen. Even worse, it leads to a chilling effect 
for  those  who  are  asked  to serve  in  the  military  public  affairs  field.  The 
conclusion to be drawn, logically, for anyone in the military who is asked to do 
something involving public affairs is that there is no tolerance for innovation, 
much less for human error that could conceivably be seized upon by a press that 
seems to demand perfection from the government, but does not apply the same 
standard to the enemy or even sometimes to themselves.
48
European governments, in part because their policies are for the most 
part less challenging than are the attitudes, actions, and actors of the United 
States, have been able to use public diplomatic methods in their containment 
efforts that are more open, and more reliant on the structures and forms of 
conventional diplomacy. Their responses are also becoming more multilateral. 
For instance,  in responding  to  the Danish cartoon  crisis, Prime Minister 
Rasmussen in early February, rather belatedly to be sure, invited the foreign 
ambassadors in Denmark, including those from Muslim countries, to meet 
with him to discuss the controversy. This followed his refusal in October of 
last year to meet representatives from ten majority member Muslim countries 
47)  Lynne Duke, ‘The Word at War: Propaganda? Nah, Here’s the Scoop, Say the Guys 
Who Planted Stories in Iraqi Papers’, Washington Post, 26 March 2006.  
48)  Rumsfeld, ‘New Realities in the Media Age’. The use of the Lincoln Group, and other 
private firms, in its informational efforts clearly has put the U.S. military on the 
defensive, causing it to have to insist that no ‘law’ has been violated in planting articles 
in Iraqi newspapers while concealing their source. Thom Shanker, ‘No Breach Seen in 
Iraq on Propaganda’, The New York Times, 21 March 2006. There obviously is 
concern among the military leadership that U.S. communications, in general, risk 
being ‘discredited’ by the reports of planted articles. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Allow to create digital signature. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
create pdf signature box; add signature field to pdf
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
PDF files to GIF images with high quality. It can be functioned as an integrated component without the use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat Reader.
create pdf with signature field; add signature to pdf online
22 
who objected to publication of the drawings.
49
Two weeks later, Danish 
Foreign Minister Per Stig Møller and Bishop Steen Skovsgaard of the Danish 
People’s Church in Lolland-Falster met in Vienna with Grand Mufti of Syria 
Ahmed Bader Eddin Hassoun and Grand Mufti Reis-ul-Ulema Mustafa Ceric 
of  Bosnia-Herzegovina  with  Austrian  Foreign  Minister  Ursula  Plassnik, 
representing the Austrian EU Presidency. The success of this Austrian effort 
to offer leadership at the European level was limited. The Muslim visitors, 
perhaps reluctant to appear ‘instrumentalized’ or to seem to be part of a mere 
‘containment’ exercise, declined to participate in a press conference following 
the meeting. A statement by EU foreign ministers soon afterward backed the 
promotion  of  ‘dialogue’  with  Muslim  countries,  principally  through  the 
existing Euro-Mediterranean—Barcelona—process as well as through the Asia 
Europe Meetings (ASEM). The EU also threw its weight behind an earlier 
Turkish-Spanish  initiative  for  an  ‘Alliance  of  Civilizations’,  in  part  an 
evolution of the United Nations’ 2001 Year of Dialogue among Civilizations 
that then-President, Seyed Mohamed Khatami of Iran had initiated at a UN 
General Assembly session in 1998.
50
The Secretary-General of the United Nations, Kofi Annan, called for a 
roundtable of influential Muslim-country political and religious figures and 
other international dignitaries, using an already existing group he had recently 
formed, the High-Level Group for Alliance of Civilizations.
51
The government 
of Qatar offered to host the AOC meeting, which took place in Doha on 26 
February 2006. At the event Secretary-General Annan, expressed a strong 
sense  of  urgency  as  well  as  some  frustration  at  the  ineffectiveness  of 
49)  ‘Danish PM tries to ease a cartoon row’, AlJazeera.Net, 2 February 2006. Anders 
Fogh Rasmussen’s refusal prompted twenty-two former Danish diplomats, including 
some who had served in Muslim countries, publicly to criticize the Prime Minister for 
‘snubbing’ the eleven Arab and Muslim country ambassadors who had requested a 
meeting with him to discuss the cartoons. ‘Danish Diplomats Bash PM Over Anti-
Prophet 
Cartoons’, 
12 
February 
2006, 
IslamOnline.net, 
http://islamonline.net/English/News/2005-12/20/article07.shtml. 
50)  Former  President  Khatami  himself,  however,  stressed  that  the  ‘Alliance  of 
Civilizations’ was different  from  his concept  of  ‘Dialogue  among  Civilizations’, 
although he  participated  personally in the latter effort as well.  ‘An alliance  of 
civilizations  will  be  meaningless  without  dialogue  among  civilizations’,  he said. 
‘Khatami: Alliance of Civilizations Meaningless Without Dialogue’, Payvand’s Iran 
News, 30 November 2005, http://www.payvand.com/news/05/nov/1283.html. 
51)  ‘Secretary-General  Announces Composition of High-level Group for  Alliance  of 
Civilizations’, Secretary-General, SG/SM/10073/Rev.1*, News and Media Division, 
Department 
of 
Public 
Information, 
United 
Nations, 
http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2005/sgsm10073.doc.htm. 
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
add signature to pdf reader; create signature field in pdf
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
Different from other image converters, users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any other print drivers when they use DICOM to PDF Converter.
add signature to preview pdf; adding a signature to a pdf
23 
traditional  forms  of  diplomacy.  He  hoped  that  the  High-Level  Group 
members  would  come  up  with  suggestions  that  would  ‘really  catch  the 
popular imagination, so that we are not just a nice group of people agreeing 
with each other, but people with a message that can echo round the world’. 
He  therefore said: ‘We  need  to  engage in dialogue  not only scholars, or 
diplomats  or  politicians but  also  artists,  entertainers,  sports  champions—
people  who  command  respect  and  attention  right  across  society,  and 
especially among young people, because it is very important to reach young 
people before their ideas and attitudes have fully crystallized.’
52
This Doha meeting, and other gestures like it including a joint statement 
by  UN  Secretary-General  Annan,  the  Organization  of  the  Islamic 
Conference’s Secretary-General Ekmeleddin  Ihsanoglu,  and the  European 
Union’s High Representative for Common Foreign and Security Policy Javier 
Solana, all were efforts to ‘calm’—essentially, to contain—the situation.
53
No 
‘solid plan of action’ yet has resulted. While sympathetic with short-term and 
also longer-term purposes of the AOC initiative, one can nonetheless to a 
degree understand the skeptical thinking behind the Fox News description of 
the Alliance of Civilizations as a ‘daisy-chain’.
54
It was no arc of containment. 
52)  ‘Annan envisions popular dialogue: Entertainers, athletes called on to speak to east-
west 
divide’, 
The 
Daily 
Star, 
27 
February 
2006, 
http://www.dailystar.com.lb/printable.asp?art_ID=22506&cat_ID=2. 
53)  ‘Joint Statement by Kofi A. Annan, Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, and Javier Solana, 8 
February 2006, 
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/02/08/asia/web.0208.islamstatement.php. A balanced 
expression of sensitivity to religious belief, affirmation of free speech, condemnation of 
protesters’ violence, and call for protection of all diplomatic premises and foreign 
citizens, the statement of the three secretaries-general ended with an ‘appeal for 
restraint and calm, in the spirit of friendship and mutual respect’. 
54)  Claudia Rosett and George Russell, ‘New U.N. Scheme: Alliance of Civilizations’, 22 
November 
2005, 
FOXNews.com, 
http://www.foxnews.com/printer_friendly_story/0,3566,176362,00.html.  The  full 
phrase was ‘a daisy-chain of dubious associations that cast serious doubt both on the 
project itself and on the U.N.’s ability to cut loose from the scandals of the past 
decade’, with reference to two of the former UN Secretariat officials involved in the 
AOC, Iqbal Riza and Giandomenico Picco. 
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
PDF to TIFF Converter doesn't require other third-party such as Adobe Acrobat. PDF to TIFF Converter can create the output TIFF image with 68-1024 dpi.
create pdf signature box; adding signature to pdf in preview
24 
P
ENETRATION
 third  policy-based  strategic  concept  of  public  diplomacy,  sometimes 
combined with containment, is penetration, or the attempt to reach target 
audiences and even to form relationships with selected persons or groups deep 
inside a target territory. This can be and has been done through the work of 
intelligence services, of course, but it also can be done through such public-
diplomatic  means  as  radio  programming  and  educational  and  cultural 
exchanges as well as, of course, exploratory trade and business relationships. 
The use of this term in the business world is suggestive of its meaning in 
international relations as well. 
Market penetration occurs when a company enters, or ‘penetrates’, a 
market with its current products or services by either gaining customers from 
competitors  (a  company  or  even  the  government  of  the  country  whose 
territory  is  entered),  attracting  non-users  of  the  product  or  service,  or 
convincing current clients to use more of what it has to offer. This general 
idea can be seen, for instance, in an article by the writer on public diplomacy, 
Mark Leonard, titled ‘The Great Firewall of China Will Fall’. Despite the 
Beijing-ordered operation  by  Chinese computer scientists of  an electronic 
‘firewall with a least four different kinds of filter’, and even the acceptance of 
a degree of self-censorship by Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, and some other 
Western companies, most outside information still will get through and most 
internal messages still will get around—with the resulting likelihood that ‘the 
dream of a democratic China has not been deferred’.
55
If the society or bloc of countries being addressed is relatively ‘closed’, 
such penetration may be as difficult to achieve as it can be important—as a 
generator of current ‘inside’ information and as a builder of ‘bridges’ for 
future  collaboration.  Contacts  that  may  be  established  thereby,  with 
dissidents (perhaps including persons with ethnic, religious, or other ties to 
the sending country) as well as with potential alternative political, economic, 
and scientific leaders, do exert pressure on the existing authorities of the 
receiving country. Such contacts thus can be risky, in ‘downside’ as well as 
‘upside’ ways. Sometimes, of course, provocation resulting from penetrative 
diplomacy is intentional, and it can gain an advantage for one side. But it can 
55)  Mark Leonard, ‘The Great Firewall of China Will Fall’, The Daily Telegraph, 26 
January 2006. 
25 
also occur entirely unexpectedly, and disadvantageously. It can result, for 
instance,  from  relatively  innocent  and  benign  activities  such as  scholarly 
research or journalistic reporting, if the government of the host state considers 
them to be improper ‘interference’ in its domestic affairs, or even ‘espionage’. 
The charge of espionage can be a ploy to gain bargaining leverage for a spy 
exchange. That, too, has happened. Famous ‘incidents’ from the Cold War 
era are the 1963 Barghoorn case and the 1986 Daniloff case.
56
Normally, 
however,  as  with  the  educational  relationships  that  the  British  Council 
developed with Soviet institutions during that period relationships proceeded 
without notable incident, as long as ‘reciprocity’ carefully was maintained. 
Penetration  through  exchanges,  whether  government-organized  or 
entirely private in initiative, is a subtle business. It is unlikely therefore to have 
major consequences, at least in the short run. Excessive claims have been 
made  for  the  effectiveness  of  these  and  related  programs.  That  ‘public 
diplomacy’  brought  about—or  even  was  an  important  factor  in  bringing 
about—the ‘collapse of communism’ may be, as Martin Rose has pointed out, 
‘an exaggerated case of post hoc ergo propter hoc’.
57
A good (or bad) example is 
a University of Pennsylvania Press blurb announcing a book by a former U.S. 
foreign service officer, Yale Richmond, titled, Cultural Exchange and the Cold 
War: Raising the Iron Curtain. ‘Some fifty thousand Soviets visited the United 
States under various exchange programs between 1958 and 1988’, it said. 
‘They came as scholars and students, scientists and engineers, writers and 
journalists, government and party officials, musicians, dancers, and athletes—
and among them were more than a few KGB officers. They came, they saw, 
they were conquered, and the Soviet Union would never again be the same.’
58
One  of the Soviet students who came to the United States in 1958 was 
Mikhail Gorbachev’s adviser, Alexander Yakovlev, considered by many to be 
the  author of the ‘glasnost’ policy. However,  when  he was a student at 
Columbia University in New York that year, as Yakovlev later recalled, he 
had  ‘a  very ambivalent  impression’. He recognized, of course, America’s 
56)  Professor Frederick C. Barghoorn of Yale University was briefly held by the Soviet 
government under a charge of espionage in 1963 and the U.S. News & World Report 
writer Nicholas Daniloff was similarly accused and held in 1986. 
57)  Martin Rose, ‘Supporting the Acrobat: Public Diplomacy & Trust’, address delivered 
at  the  Annenberg  School  for  Communication,  University  of  Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia, 27 January 2006. 
58)  ‘New Book Demonstrates How Cultural Exchange Programs Helped to Raise the Iron 
Curtain’, 
American 
Diplomacy 
website, 
28 
May 
2003, 
http://www.unc.edu/depts/diplomat/archives_roll/2003_04-
06/richmond_exchange/richmond_exchange.html. 
26 
wealth but he was ‘terribly irritated by the primitive criticism’ of his 
country by Americans. The kind of propaganda he encountered ‘pushed me 
toward  more  conservative  attitudes’,  he  said.  ‘This  was  not  a  matter  of 
intelligence or reason, it was just a matter of emotions. It caused negative 
emotions.’
59
The  longer-term  effect  of  Yakovlev’s  sojourn  at  Columbia, 
however, presumably was more positive and liberalizing, but it is difficult 
really  to  know the balance  of it.  The  publisher’s description  of  Cultural 
Exchange and the Cold War also noted parenthetically that these exchange 
programs  ‘brought  an  even  larger  number  of  Americans  to  the  Soviet 
Union’.
60
It would not be even plausible, however, to suggest that, as a result 
of the Americans’ exposure then, the United States ‘would never again be the 
same’.
61
The post-Cold War world has seen ‘a major shift from ideological to 
cultural engagement’, and this is a much more complex process than the 
generally propagandistic efforts of the Cold War era. ‘Where once public 
diplomacy was a crowbar that could usefully be inserted in the cracks of the 
other ideological position to break it down’, as Martin Rose emphasizes, ‘it is 
now a much more elusive and ambiguous instrument.’
62
It is an instrument 
that  has  been  called,  however,  the  ‘linchpin’  of  public  diplomacy.  That 
argument, and title, is used by the authors of the Report of the Advisory 
Committee  on  Cultural  Diplomacy  recently  carried  out  for  the  U.S. 
Department of State.  Part of the point the authors of the Report make is that 
‘when our nation is at war, every tool in the diplomatic kit bag is employed, 
including the promotion of cultural activities’. However, ‘when peace returns, 
culture gets short shrift’. A peacetime emphasis on cultural promotion and 
exchange could, the Advisory Committee’s proposition seems to be, ‘create 
enduring structures’. Cultural diplomacy could create ‘a foundation of trust’ 
59)  ‘Shaping  Russia’s  Transformation:  A  Leader  of  Perestroika  Looks  Back—
Conversation with Alexander Yakovlev’, by Harry Kreisler, Institute of International 
Studies, 
University  of  California,  Berkeley,  21  November 
1996, 
http://globetrotter.berkeley.edu/Elberg/Yakovlev/yak-con0.html. 
60)  ‘New Book Demonstrates How Cultural Exchange Programs Helped to Raise the Iron 
Curtain’. 
61)  One cannot help but think, however, of the impact on the course of American history 
of a non-exchange-student adventurer who found his way from the United States to 
Russia for a period, and returned, disastrously: Lee Harvey Oswald, the assassin of 
President John F. Kennedy on 22 November 1963.  
62)  Rose, ‘Supporting the Acrobat’. 
27 
with other peoples, on which policy makers could build ‘to reach political, 
economic, and military agreements’.
63
Exploitation of  peacetime  opportunities  also would  facilitate  creating 
‘relationships with peoples’, which endure beyond changes in government. It 
would, more specifically, ‘reach influential members of foreign societies, who 
cannot be reached through traditional embassy functions’.
64
These persons 
could develop into a network, a root system of familiarity and trust. The logic 
is explained metaphorically by former Secretary of State George P. Shultz, 
who analogized diplomacy in general to gardening. ‘You get the weeds out 
when they are small. You also build confidence and understanding. Then, 
when a crisis arises, you have a solid base from which to work.’ The role of 
cultural  diplomacy thus  would  seem  to  be ‘to plant  seeds’.
65
For this  to 
happen, a certain amount of early, organized, and penetrative, spade work is 
needed. 
With regard to Iran today, the U.S. government is newly conducting a 
two-track approach, recently outlined by Secretary Rice before the Senate 
Committee on Foreign Relations. This was reported as being, first, ‘concerted 
international pressure to deter Tehran from building a bomb’—in a sense, 
though the word is not used, containment. Then there is something new: ‘a 
newly robust attempt to seed democratic change inside the country with $75 
million for broadcasts and aid to dissidents’—in a word, penetration. This 
money  would  go  to  aid  dissidents  and  scholars  and  also  to  fund  Farsi 
language radio and satellite programming ‘in the mold of the old Radio Free 
Europe’, as an Associated Press reporter understood it. Secretary Rice herself 
stated: ‘The United States wishes to reach out to the Iranian people and 
support their desire to realize their own freedom and to secure their own 
democratic  and human rights. The  Iranian  people  should know  that the 
United  States  fully  supports  their  aspirations  for  a  freer,  better  future.’  
Another State Department official, understandably speaking on condition of 
anonymity, ‘refused to say whether the money is intended to help an eventual 
63)  Cultural  Diplomacy:  The  Linchpin  of  Public  Diplomacy,  Report  of  the  Advisory 
Committee on Cultural Diplomacy, U.S. Department of State, September 2005.  
64)  Ibid. 
65)  The Shultz diplomacy/gardening comparison quoted in the Report of the Advisory 
Committee on Cultural Diplomacy is from George P. Shultz, ‘Diplomacy in the 
Information Age’, paper presented at the Conference on Virtual Diplomacy, U.S. 
Institute of Peace, Washington, DC, 1 April 1997, 9.  
28 
overthrow of the mullah-led government’—that is, to bring about regime 
change.
66
The Department’s newly created Office of Iranian Affairs, headed by the 
Vice President’s daughter Elizabeth Cheney as a Deputy Assistant Secretary 
of  State,  is  currently  examining  applications  for  financial  support  in  an 
expanding program aimed at changing the political process inside Iran. In this 
competition  for  funding,  according  to  a  State  Department  website 
announcement,  applicants  ‘must  outline  activities  linked  to  reform  and 
demonstrate how the proposed approach would achieve sustainable impact on 
Iran’. A Department official acknowledged that activists inside Iran who apply 
for funds do so at ‘considerable personal risk’. Other experts said these might 
not be the best ones to get the money. As result of these considerations, the 
New York Times reported, ‘State Department officials and various advocates 
for change consulted by the department said that for now the money would 
probably  be  concentrated  on  groups  seeking  to  document  human  rights 
abuses and promote women’s and labor rights, rather than groups seeking 
direct political change.’
67
E
NLARGEMENT
A fourth general strategy, in this case directly associated with a policy term, is 
enlargement, or expansion of the ideological, economic, and also political and 
cultural sphere of a country and its allies on a very broad front, rather than to 
prise open a beachhead of influence within a particular country. Perhaps the 
most graphic expression of the ‘enlargement’ idea was that of the National 
Security Adviser in the first Clinton administration, Anthony Lake, when he 
said: ‘During the Cold War, even children understood America’s security 
mission; as they looked at those maps on their schoolroom walls, they knew 
we were trying to contain the creeping expansion of that big, red blob. Today, 
at great risk of oversimplification, we might visualize our security mission as 
promoting the enlargement of the “blue areas” of market democracies.’  He 
66)  Anne Gearan, ‘Senate Republicans Criticize Rice on Iraq’, The Associated Press, 15 
February 2006. 
67)  Steven R. Weisman, ‘U.S. Program Is Directed at Altering Iran’s Politics’, The New 
York Times, 15 April 2006. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested