Rights of return — products are currently available 
Fact Set: 
The Vendor currently has four products: Product A, Product B, Product C, and Product D. The products 
are all in the same product family, have been available for five years, and are marketed to high-income 
adults. However, they have different functionality levels and are licensed at significantly different prices, 
but VSOE of fair value can be determined for each. The Vendor's history suggests that 10 to 20% of 
these products are returned. The Vendor plans to introduce Product N early next year. Product N will be 
the first in a new family of products that will be marketed to children. 
Question: 
The Vendor enters into an arrangement with Customer X for the licensing of Product A for $500. Included 
in its arrangement with Customer X is a clause that states, “For six months from the date of delivery, 
Customer X can return Product A and receive a credit off the license fee for Products B, C or D equal to 
50% of the purchase price of Product A ($250).” How should revenue under the arrangement be 
recognized? 
Answer: 
The facts and circumstances in each case would have to be evaluated to determine if a reasonable 
estimate of returns could be made. In the fact pattern above, the details suggest that a reasonable 
estimate of returns could be made. Factors to consider in drawing this conclusion are as follows: 
Products A, B, C and D have been marketed for five years; 
Products A, B, C and D are marketed to a homogeneous population; and 
Products A, B, C and D are all in the same product family. 
If a reasonable estimate of returns can be made, revenue under the arrangement should be recognized 
upon the delivery of Product A, assuming that all other revenue recognition criteria have been met. The 
Vendor would record a returns reserve, based on its FAS 48 analysis of returns. 
Rights of return — products are not currently available 
Fact Set: 
Assume that the same fact pattern as that which is stated in the last fact set pertains here. 
Question: 
The Vendor enters into an arrangement with Customer Y for the licensing of Product B for $1,000. 
Included in its arrangement with Customer Y is a clause that states, “Upon the introduction of Product N, 
Customer Y can return Product B and receive 50% off the license fee of Product N for six months after 
the date that Product N first becomes available.” VSOE of the fair values of Products B and N exist. How 
should revenue under the arrangement be recognized? 
Answer: 
Facts and circumstances will vary from case to case and need to be evaluated individually to determine if 
a reasonable estimate of returns can be made. Based on the facts presented above, it would seem that a 
reasonable estimate of returns cannot be made. Factors to consider in drawing this conclusion are as 
follows: 
Product N is a new product and not yet available; 
Product N will be marketed towards a new population of consumers; 
Product N is in a new product family, with which the Vendor has no experience; and 
The period for returns is long (i.e., Product N will not be introduced until next year and the return 
right extends for six months after the date that Product N first becomes available). 
www.pwcrevrec.com  
79 
Pdf sign in - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
add signature to pdf acrobat reader; adding a signature to a pdf file
Pdf sign in - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
add signature box to pdf; sign pdf
If a reasonable estimate of returns cannot be made, revenue under the arrangement should be deferred 
until Product N has been delivered or the return right lapses, assuming that all other criteria for revenue 
recognition have been met. 
Return rights for unspecified products — specified term 
Fact Set: 
The Vendor enters into an arrangement with the Customer whereby the Customer licenses Product A for 
$5,000. The Vendor's strategy is to make its lower-end product, Product A, very attractive to potential 
customers by pricing it below the competition. However, all of the Vendor's arrangements include a 
clause that states, “the Customer can receive full credit for the license fee of Product A when licensing 
any of the Vendor's other existing products or new products for a 12-month period starting at the date of 
delivery of Product A.” The Vendor's objective is to induce customers to license its higher-end products, 
for which the margins are substantially greater, during the 12 months after the delivery of Product A. 
Question: 
The Vendor has concluded that it can reasonably estimate returns for Product A at 20% of the total sales. 
How should the $5,000 of revenue be recognized? 
Answer: 
Because the Vendor can reasonably estimate returns, $4,000 (80% x $5,000) should be recognized upon 
the delivery of Product A, and the remaining $1,000 deferred and recognized when the return privilege 
has substantially expired or when Product A has actually been returned and the new product(s) delivered, 
assuming that all other criteria for revenue recognition have been met. 
Return rights for unspecified products — unlimited term 
Fact Set: 
The Customer agrees to license Product Z from the Vendor for $100,000. Product Z is an inventory 
tracking system that is for Platform A. The Vendor also has developed Products A, B, and C, which 
operate on Platform B. As part of the license agreement, the Customer obtains the right to return Product 
Z at any time for 40% off the license fee of one or more of the other products. The Vendor's products are 
not typically sold at a discount from list. 
Question: 
How should the $100,000 of revenue be recognized? 
Answer: 
As the term of the return privilege is indefinite, the Vendor may have difficulty reasonably estimating 
returns. If no such estimate can be made, all the revenue must be deferred until a reasonable estimate of 
returns can be made. 
4.2  Exchange and platform-transfer rights 
If a right to exchange a delivered element for another element qualifies for exchange accounting and all 
other revenue recognition criteria have been met, all revenue from the arrangement should be recorded 
upon the delivery of the initial software. The subsequent exchange of products has no impact on revenue 
recognition. We again emphasize that if the customer is entitled, either by contractual terms or business 
practices, to continue using both the software that was initially delivered, as well as the software received 
in the exchange, the right must be accounted for as a right to an additional product as discussed in 
Chapter 3. The originally delivered software does not have to be physically returned, as long as the 
customer's contractual right to use the originally delivered product has terminated. 
80  
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Use C# Demo to Sign Your PDF Document. Add necessary references: This is a simple C# demo that show you how to sign your PDF document using XDoc.PDF.
add signature to preview pdf; adding signature to pdf form
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
Use VB.NET Demo to Sign Your PDF Document. Add necessary references: This is a simple VB.NET demo that explains how to sign your PDF document using XDoc.PDF.
click to sign pdf; add signature pdf
Paragraphs 50 through 54 of SOP 97-2 address the issue of exchange and platform-transfer rights. A 
platform-transfer right is defined in SOP 97-2 as a right granted by a vendor to transfer software from one 
hardware platform or operating system to one or more other hardware platforms or operating systems. 
SOP 97-2 specifically addresses the fact that the revenue ramifications of an exchange right are different 
from those of a right of return. Paragraph 50 states, "As part of an arrangement, a software vendor may 
provide the customer with the right to return software or to exchange software for products with no more 
than minimal differences in price, functionality, or features." (Emphasis added.) With regard to platform-
transfer rights, paragraph 53 notes that they can be accounted for in a manner similar to how an 
exchange right is accounted for when the right "1) is for the same product (see paragraph 54) and 2) does 
not increase the number of copies or concurrent users of the software product available under the license 
arrangement." Paragraph 54 adds that the products involved in the exchange right must also be 
"marketed as the same product." 
It must be noted that exchange accounting cannot be applied to exchange rights that are granted to 
resellers. Because a reseller is not the end user, such rights must be accounted for as returns. Exchange 
rights granted to resellers are addressed in Chapter 7. 
4.2.1  Exchange and platform-transfer rights for specified products currently 
available 
If a right that is included in an arrangement meets the criteria discussed above, recognizing revenue upon 
the delivery of the initial product is appropriate, assuming that all other revenue recognition criteria have 
been met and the products and/or platforms eligible for exchange are currently available. Paragraph 51 of 
SOP 97-2 states, “Conversely, exchanges by users of software products for dissimilar software products 
or for similar software products with more than minimal differences in price, functionality, or features are 
considered returns, and revenue related to arrangements that provide users with the right to make such 
exchanges should be accounted for in conformity with FAS 48.” 
SOP 97-2 does not provide guidance on interpreting the word minimal in paragraph 50. Revenue 
recognition in these cases is subjectively determined and should be decided on a case-by-case basis. 
Paragraph 54 indicates that two products may be considered the same even though there may be 
differences between them that arise from environmental variables such as operating systems, user 
interfaces, and platform scales. Indications that products have been “marketed as the same product” 
include the same product name (although version numbers may differ), similar pricing, and/or an 
emphasis on the same features and functions. Factors that may indicate that there are more than minimal 
differences between a product and other products or that the product is not marketed in the same way as 
other products may include the following: 
The product that is to be received in the exchange has a different name; 
The new product performs functions in areas outside the domain in which the original product 
operated; 
The reporting options available to the customer in the new software are either more numerous or 
more limited than the original software; 
Marketing materials promote significantly increased functionality or features; and 
The customer orders more copies or site licenses for the new product than it had for the old 
product, indicating that functionality may have increased, which enables more users to benefit 
from the product. 
www.pwcrevrec.com  
81 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature. To view, convert, edit, process, protect, sign PDF files, please refer to XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET overview.
adding a signature to a pdf document; add signature field to pdf
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
View PDF outlines. Related Resources. To view, convert, edit, process, protect, sign PDF files, please refer to XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET overview.
add signature to pdf document; create signature from pdf
4.2.2  Exchange and platform-transfer rights for specified products not currently 
available 
Paragraph 51 of SOP 97-2 addresses product exchange rights for cases in which all the products are not 
currently available. It states, “If the other product(s) is not available at the time the initial product is 
delivered, there should be persuasive evidence that demonstrates there will be no more than minimal 
differences in price, features, or functionality among the products in order for the right to quality as a right 
to exchange. Additionally, if the vendor expects to incur a significant amount of development costs related 
to the other product, the other product should be considered to have more than a minimal difference in 
functionality.” 
The evaluation of what constitutes “persuasive evidence” should be made on a case-by-case basis. 
Factors to consider in determining whether the evidence is sufficient to support the assertion that there 
will be no more than minimal differences in price, features, or functionality include the following: 
Whether the specifications for the new product are similar to those for the old product; 
Whether the difference between the prices of the two products can be reasonably estimated as 
minimal; 
Whether the marketing material for the two products is similar; 
Whether potential customers are awaiting the release of the new product to place an order; and 
Whether the period preceding the introduction of the new product into the market is short, and 
whether the impact of possible changes in environmental factors that could change the vendor's 
plans is minimal. 
In a situation where a customer orders a product but the vendor delivers a substitute product because the 
ordered product is not currently available, the vendor may grant the customer a right to exchange the 
delivered product for the ordered product when available. Additional considerations beyond those above 
include: 
Whether the customer can use the substitute product after the ordered product is delivered; 
Whether the fee is subject to refund or concession if the ordered product is not delivered; 
Whether the vendor intends to grant or has a history of granting a refund or other concession if 
the ordered product is not delivered. 
4.2.3  Exchange and platform-transfer rights for unspecified products 
Some software arrangements involve exchange rights for unspecified products or platforms. If the criteria 
in paragraphs 50 through 55 of SOP 97-2 are met, the right may qualify for exchange accounting. 
Paragraphs 48 and 49 of SOP 97-2 indicate that if the right does not qualify for exchange accounting, 
subscription accounting should be applied. 
4.2.4  Sunset clauses 
Oftentimes customers will negotiate the right to exchange a product if the vendor discontinues the product 
and ceases providing support for the product (i.e., "sunsets the product"), to protect itself against the risk 
of early product obsolescence — commonly referred to as a sunset clause. Considerations in assessing 
the impact of such clauses on revenue recognition include: 
Does the agreement require that the "replacement product" has no more than minimal differences 
in price, features, and functionality as the already owned product? 
If the customer avails itself of the option to receive the "replacement product", must the customer 
return, destroy, or contractually cease using the already owned product? 
82  
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET. Related Resources. To view, convert, edit, process, protect, sign PDF files, please refer to XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET overview.
create pdf signature; pdf signature stamp
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create To view, convert, edit, process, built, sign Word documents, please refer to
pdf to word converter sign in; pdf create signature
If the answer to both considerations is yes, then the exchange right is not considered an additional 
element of the arrangement and would not impact the revenue recognition. If, however, the answer to 
either of the considerations is no, then the contractual provision is considered an additional element of the 
arrangement and could potentially impact the revenue recognition. If VSOE of fair value does not exist for 
the additional element, the arrangement should be accounted for as a subscription and the entire fee 
should be recognized over the contractual term or the estimated economic life. Judgment is required 
based on the economic substance of the arrangement to determine the conclusion of whether the fee 
should be recognized over the contractual term or the estimated economic life. 
Questions and Answers 
Exchange rights for the same product 
Fact Set: 
The Vendor enters into an arrangement with the Customer for $250,000 on June 30, X1 to license 
Product A on Platform X. Pursuant to the terms of the arrangement, the Customer can exchange Product 
A on Platform X for Product A on Platform Y at any point. Product A on Platform X has the same features 
and functionality as Product A on Platform Y and is (1) marketed as having the same features and 
functionality and (2) currently licensed at the same price. The arrangement specifically states, “The 
Customer surrenders the right to continue to use Product A on Platform X upon receiving Product A on 
Platform Y.” 
Question: 
Does the arrangement qualify for exchange accounting? Can the Vendor recognize the $250,000 on 
June 30, X1? 
Answer: 
The arrangement does qualify for exchange accounting. The Customer's right to Product A on Platform X 
terminates upon its receipt of Product A on Platform Y. On June 30, X1, the Vendor can recognize 
$250,000 related to this arrangement, assuming that all other criteria for revenue recognition have been 
met. 
Exchange rights — continued use of original version 
Fact Set: 
Assume that the same fact pattern as that which is stated in the last fact set pertains here, except that the 
Customer has no contractual obligation to return Product A on Platform X and will be entitled to continue 
using that version. 
Question: 
Does the arrangement qualify for exchange accounting? Can the Vendor recognize the $250,000 on 
June 30, X1? 
Answer: 
The arrangement does not qualify for exchange accounting. Paragraph 50 of SOP 97-2 states, “If the 
software is not returned physically and the customer contractually is entitled to continue to use the 
previously delivered software, the arrangement should be accounted for in the manner prescribed in the 
section herein entitled 'Additional Software Products.'” See Chapter 5 for discussion of accounting for 
additional products as part of a multiple-element arrangement. 
www.pwcrevrec.com  
83 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
adding a signature to a pdf; pdf add signature field
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Purchase information
XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Acquisition. XImage.Twain. XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET. View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images.
adding signature to pdf file; pdf sign
Platform-transfer rights for specified product not currently available — insignificant development 
costs yet to be incurred 
Fact Set: 
On January 31, X1, the Vendor enters into a licensing arrangement with the Customer for Product X, 
which is operating on Platform A (the platform that is currently being used by the Customer), for 
$500,000. Pursuant to the terms of the arrangement, the Vendor delivers Product X on January 31, X1. 
The arrangement also contains a provision that the Customer can exchange its current version of Product 
X for a new version of Product X that operates on a different operating system (Platform B). The 
Customer is in the process of converting to Platform B. The Vendor anticipates that the new version of 
Product X will be available on October 29, X1. The price for the two versions will be the same, and the 
same features and functionality are being marketed with both versions. 
Question: 
Does the arrangement qualify for exchange accounting? Can the Vendor recognize the $500,000 on 
January 31, X1? 
Answer: 
The right may be accounted for as an exchange if the Vendor has persuasive evidence that (1) there will 
be no more than minimal differences in price, functionality, or features between the two versions, (2) all of 
the other criteria for revenue recognition have been met, and (3) the Customer will not be entitled to 
continue using the Platform A version of Product X after the exchange occurs. Even though this situation 
appears to involve a platform-transfer right that would be subject to exchange accounting, since the 
Customer is in the process of converting to Platform B, delivery of the new version of Product X may likely 
be required under the agreement. If delivery of the new version of Product X is required, the $500,000 
would be deferred until the new version is delivered (as the price for the two versions is the same). 
Platform-transfer rights for specified product not currently available — significant development 
costs yet to be incurred 
Fact Set: 
Assume that the same facts as those in the last fact set pertain here, except that the Vendor does not 
anticipate that the Platform B version of Product X will be available until December 29, X3, which is more 
than two years after the delivery of the Platform A version of Product X. The Vendor anticipates that the 
development costs for the new version of Product X will be in excess of the arrangement fee of $500,000 
but significantly less than the anticipated revenue for the year ended X2. 
Question: 
Does the arrangement qualify for exchange accounting? Can the Vendor recognize the $500,000 on 
January 31, X1? 
Answer: 
Given that the timeline for the delivery of the new version extends more than two years beyond the 
delivery of the initial product, it is unlikely that this arrangement would qualify for exchange accounting. 
Because of the extended time until the new version will be available, the risks of changes in market 
conditions and the underlying technology is very high. Consequently, it may be difficult for the Vendor to 
establish that the features, functionality and pricing of the new version will be the same as the old version. 
If the Vendor were to conclude that exchange accounting is not appropriate, the right to receive the new 
version would be evaluated as a right of return. Considering how long it will take to release the new 
version, it is unlikely that an estimate of returns could be made. 
84  
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Technical Specifications Introductions
XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Acquisition. XImage.Twain. XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET. View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images.
add signature to pdf file; add signature to pdf preview
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Add a new Form Item to the project, and choose to design mode sign.
pdf will signature; sign pdf online
Platform-transfer rights for unspecified products — not qualifying for exchange accounting 
Fact Set: 
On September 30, X1, the Vendor enters into a licensing arrangement with the Customer for Product X, 
which is operating on Platform A (the platform that is currently being used by the Customer), for 
$750,000. Pursuant to the terms of the arrangement, the Vendor delivers Product X. The arrangement 
also contains a provision that the Customer can exchange its current version of Product X for another 
version of Product X that operates on a different operating system. The different operating system is not 
specified in the arrangement. 
Question: 
Does the arrangement qualify for exchange accounting? Can the Vendor recognize the $750,000 on 
September 30, X1? 
Answer: 
Given that the Vendor has granted the Customer an unspecified platform-transfer right (as no other 
platform has been identified) that does not expire, it is unlikely that this arrangement would qualify for 
exchange accounting. Because of the extended time, the risks of changes in market conditions and the 
underlying technology is very high. Consequently, it may be difficult for the Vendor to establish that the 
features, functionality and pricing of the new product will be the same as the original. If the Vendor were 
to conclude that exchange accounting is not appropriate, all software-related revenue from the 
arrangement should be recognized over the term of the arrangement beginning with the delivery of the 
first product. As the term of the arrangement is not stated, the revenue should be recognized ratably over 
the estimated economic life of the products. Intent on the part of the Vendor not to develop new products 
during the term of the arrangement does not relieve the Vendor of the requirement to recognize revenue 
ratably. 
Observation: 
The above example highlights the accounting for a transaction with only a software deliverable and an 
unspecified platform-transfer right. However an assessment is required of the revenue criteria in 
conjunction with paragraph 12 of SOP 97-2 to determine the appropriate accounting in a multiple-element 
arrangements where there are additional deliverables. Refer to Chapter 3 or further discussion of 
application on subscription accounting related to unspecified additional future products. 
Platform-transfer rights for unspecified products — exchange accounting applies 
Fact Set: 
Assume that the same facts as those in the previous example pertain here, except that the Vendor 
includes specific language in the arrangement such that “an exchange can occur only at the Vendor's 
determination that the exchanged product has similar pricing, features and functionality to that of the 
original.” 
Question: 
Does the arrangement qualify for exchange accounting? Can the Vendor recognize the $750,000 on 
September 30, X1? 
Answer: 
Although all relevant facts and circumstances would need to be considered, the right may be accounted 
for as an exchange if the Vendor has persuasive evidence that (1) there will be no more than minimal 
differences in price, functionality, or features between the two versions, (2) the Vendor does not have a 
business practice of accepting platform-transfers which do not qualify as exchanges, (3) all of the other 
criteria for revenue recognition have been met, and (4) the Customer will not be entitled to continue using 
the Platform A version of Product X after the exchange occurs. 
www.pwcrevrec.com  
85 
Chapter 5: 
Specified upgrades, additional products and 
other considerations 
5.0  Overview 
As noted in Chapter 3, revenue recognition for multiple-element arrangements is complicated and will 
vary with the nature of each of the deliverables and how, if at all, each deliverable relates to or impacts 
another element. This chapter will discuss the impact of the following common multiple-elements 
considerations: 
5.1 Specified upgrades and enhancements  
5.1.1 Required and implicit unspecified upgrade rights and post contract support 
5.2 Additional products 
5.3 Specified versus unspecified additional software products 
5.4 Intellectual property infringement indemnifications 
5.5 Undelivered elements to be provided by third-party vendor 
5.1  Specified upgrades and enhancements  
SOP 97-2 defines an upgrade right as the right to receive one or more specified upgrades or 
enhancements, even if it is offered on a when-and-if-available basis. It is important to emphasize that the 
granting of an upgrade right may be evidenced not only by a specific agreement or commitment, but also 
by a vendor's established business practices. Specified upgrades and enhancements can also be 
encountered when a request for proposal (RFP) is included in or specifically referenced in a license 
agreement. RFPs can typically include specific discussions on the future functionality of the vendor's 
software products. When these discussions are included in a license contract (e.g., RFP is an exhibit, 
RFP covered by warranty or product representations, etc.) specified upgrade and enhancement revenue 
recognition issues could exist depending on the specific details in the arrangement. It is sometimes 
difficult to distinguish between a right for a specified upgrade and an additional software product. As 
discussed in detail in section 5.2, this distinction is extremely important when the appropriate revenue 
recognition is being determined. Additionally, the right to specified upgrades or enhancements should be 
distinguished from the right to receive unspecified upgrades or enhancements on a when-and-if-available 
basis, which is considered to be part of PCS, as defined by SOP 97-2. PCS rights are discussed further in 
Chapter 3.  
A specified upgrade right generally allows a customer to upgrade to a newer version of the same software 
product for a fee that is substantially less than the price a new customer would pay to license the newer 
version. Such rights are often granted to customers when the vendor will soon be releasing a new version 
of the software product. Customers may decide to go ahead and license the current version, with the right 
to receive the newer version at a lower price when it becomes available. 
Specified upgrade rights should be accounted for as separate elements and, therefore, should be 
allocated a portion of the fee based on the VSOE of the fair value of the upgrade. Paragraph 37 of SOP 
97-2 indicates that this would be the price that existing users of the software product will be charged for 
the upgrade. Unlike SOP 97-2's general requirement that discounts be considered in the allocation of fees 
to the elements of an arrangement, no portion of any discount should be allocated to the upgrade right. 
See Chapter 6 for a detailed discussion of accounting for discounts. Such allocated fees should be 
recognized as revenue when all of the criteria for revenue recognition have been met for the upgrade 
right. 
86  
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Observation: 
It appears that the rules related to accounting for specified upgrades were specifically written for 
situations in which the upgrade will be licensed separately. Many vendors make major upgrades available 
to customers without charging an upgrade fee, as the specified upgrades are included as part of PCS. 
This represents an accounting issue for such vendors, because specified upgrades will not be licensed 
separately, and, therefore, no VSOE of fair value can be determined for the undelivered specified 
upgrade. Accordingly, no revenue from the arrangement can be recorded until the upgrade is delivered. 
Note that even a when-and-if-available specified upgrade cannot be accounted for as PCS, as it is not 
unspecified. We believe that these rules substantially impact a vendor's business practices and its 
willingness to offer upgrades in contracts on a specific or an implied basis, and may even impact whether 
a vendor decides to charge a separate fee for major upgrades of its software products.  
Observation: 
SOP 97-2 indicates that when a vendor is allocating an arrangement fee based on VSOE of the elements 
that are covered by the arrangement, the value that is to be assigned to a specified upgrade right is the 
price that will be charged to existing users of the software upon its being upgraded. In practice, this 
amount will often vary according to whether a customer is current with its PCS payments or whether it has 
not paid for PCS. Sometimes a vendor will require customers to become current with their PCS payments 
before they can be entitled to the reduced upgrade prices, or the vendor will require the customer to pay 
the full price of a license for the upgraded software. This raises the question of what Paragraph 37 of 
SOP 97-2 means by “the price...that would be charged to existing users of the software being updated.” 
The amount could vary from the upgrade fee to the full price of a license for the upgraded software. We 
believe that, for cases such as this, the intent of SOP 97-2 is that the fees from an arrangement should be 
allocated based on the upgrade fee for customers that are current on their PCS payments.  
License arrangements may include rights to specified upgrades or enhancements. Such rights may be 
evidenced by a specific agreement, commitment, or the vendor's established practice. Allocation of 
revenue to the specified upgrade or enhancement is required even if the customer will be entitled to 
receive the upgrade or enhancement under PCS, because the obligation is specified. However, the 
amount allocated may be reduced for the percentage of licenses that are not expected to be upgraded if 
sufficient evidence exists to support this expectation. If the vendor does not have sufficient evidence to 
estimate the percentage, then it should be presumed that all customers would exercise the upgrade right.  
The estimate of the number of customers who will take advantage of an upgrade needs to be periodically 
reviewed. Due to the nature of the software industry, products and customers tend to change frequently. 
As a result, the objective evidence that once supported an estimate may change in the future. If a change 
is made to the estimate, the effect of the change should be accounted for as a change in an accounting 
estimate and dealt with prospectively. 
Several situations that may cause customers not to exercise the upgrade right are presented below. 
These are also relevant to determining VSOE of the estimated upgrade percentage: 
The benefits gained from the related upgrade or enhancement may not be important to the 
customer; 
The customer may not wish to learn how to use the upgraded software for what may be perceived 
by that customer as marginal improvements; 
The upgrade or enhancement would require more hardware functionality than the customer 
currently has; and/or 
The implementation of the upgrade may require too much effort on the part of the customer. 
www.pwcrevrec.com  
87 
Questions & Answers 
Specified upgrade rights — VSOE exists for all elements 
Fact Set: 
The Vendor offers a software package over the Internet for $35. The Customer is advised that an 
upgrade of the software package will be released in 60 days, and, as part of the licensing arrangement, 
the Customer will receive the right to license the upgrade for $10. VSOE of the fair value of the software 
package is $35 (without the upgrade). The Vendor believes that minimal effort will be required to develop 
the upgrade, as the upgrade is being designed only to allow the program to take advantage of improved 
operating systems. The upgrade will be marketed to existing users for $15, which represents VSOE of the 
fair value of the upgrade. The Vendor expects that the Customer will exercise the upgrade right. 
Question: 
What amount of revenue would the Vendor be able to recognize once all of the revenue recognition 
criteria for the original version have been met? 
Answer: 
In this case, the Vendor has VSOE of the fair value of the original version and of the upgrade — $35 and 
$15, respectively. However, the total fee from the arrangement is only $45, so there appears to be a $5 
discount involved in the transaction. SOP 97-2 requires that the entire $15 be deferred until the delivery of 
the specified upgrade, with the remaining $30 being recognized with the delivery of the original software. 
This effectively allocates the entire discount to the delivered element. See Chapter 6 for further 
discussion of the impact of discounts. 
Vendor can reasonably estimate extent of exercise of upgrade rights 
Fact Set: 
The Vendor licenses a Web site development tool. The tool has a wide array of features and functionality 
that enable users to develop both simple and highly elaborate Web sites. The Vendor has a practice of 
charging customers a fee for upgrades. In order to continue attracting new customers and encourage 
existing customers to purchase upgrades, the Vendor continually updates the features and functionality of 
its tool, as well as incorporates all upgrades and enhancements into it as they are developed and tested. 
The Vendor has an established practice of marketing new features and functionality that it expects to 
incorporate into its tool in the near future (generally four to six weeks prior to the upgrade's expected 
general release), as well as a practice of including and specifying these upgrades in the contracts, for a 
specified fee. 
The Vendor licenses its products to a variety of end users, including individuals that purchase software for 
their personal use, small-business owners, and programmers for large, corporate IT functions. 
Historically, therefore, all customers have not exercised upgrade rights, because their software needs and 
uses vary. Because the Vendor is continually upgrading its product, each upgrade or enhancement 
offered is developed and introduced for a specific target market. The Vendor's service department has 
maintained records that the Vendor uses to determine the number of customers that are expected to 
exercise a given upgrade right. The Vendor licenses Product A to 50 customers in multiple-element 
arrangements that include a specified upgrade right. The total arrangement fee for each arrangement is 
$100. VSOE of the fair value of Product A is $100, and the Vendor expects to charge existing customers 
$20 to upgrade to the new version of Product A, representing VSOE of the fair value of the upgrade right. 
The Vendor's historical analysis clearly supports that only one-half of the customers will exercise the 
upgrade right. 
88  
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested