convert pdf to tiff c# : Adding a signature to a pdf form software SDK dll winforms wpf html web forms Python%20and%20XML5-part1676

IT-SC book 
49
version   CDATA #FIXED                "1.0" 
type      (normal|reference|appendix) "normal"> 
The 
synopsis
attribute is required to be a string (
CDATA
) if it is given at all, but it is not required, 
and does not have a default value because it is marked as 
#IMPLIED
. (Most of the attributes in 
HTML are declared this way.) The 
#REQUIRED
constraint means just what it says; the 
author
attribute must be specified in the document. Because it is a string, it may be empty. If a string 
value  is  specified  instead  of 
#IMPLIED
or 
#REQUIRED
 as  with  the 
email
attribute  in  our 
example  attribute  list,  it  becomes  the  default  value  that  is  used  if  no  value  is  given  in  the 
document.  
The 
#FIXED
constraint can only be used in conjunction with a default value, which we see for the 
version
attribute. When this constraint is used, the document is allowed to include the attribute, 
but the value must match that given by the default exactly, though it may be encoded using a 
different mixture of characters, entity references, and character references. If the value differs, an 
error is reported by the parser.  
The type
attribute is an example of an enumerated type, similar to what we looked at earlier. 
Default values and constraints are specified for enumerated types in the same way as for other 
types, with the additional constraint that if  a value is specified, it  must be one of the names 
included in the enumeration.  
ID  attributes  offer  some  unique  behavior.  Let's  create  an  attribute  for  the  news 
element we defined previously:  
<!ATTLIST news 
newsID ID #REQUIRED> 
With  this attribute list, 
news
elements are required  to have a 
newsID
attribute. The  allowed 
values are governed by the rules of the 
ID
tokenized type. Specifically, the 
ID
value is a name (as 
defined in this chapter in 
Section 2.5.2.1
) and must not appear more than once in an XML 
document as  the value of  any attribute of type 
ID
 In other  words, 
ID
values  must  uniquely 
represent an element within the document. Consider a legal example:  
<news newsID="id39">Text</news> 
<news newsID="id40">Text</news> 
Since the values of 
ID
attributes are required to be unique within a document, the following is 
illegal:  
<news newsID="id39">Text</news> 
<news newsID="id39">Text</news> 
Additionally, no element may have more than one 
ID
attribute specified. An element type may 
define more than one attribute of the 
ID
type, but at most, one 
ID
value may be specified for any 
element.  As  a  result,  some  of  the  programming APIs  can  use  the values  of 
ID
attributes to 
retrieve specific elements from a document.  
Adding a signature to a pdf form - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
adding a signature to a pdf file; create a pdf signature file
Adding a signature to a pdf form - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
sign pdf; pdf to word converter sign in
IT-SC book 
50 
What is most interesting about 
ID
attributes, however, is not the attributes themselves, but the 
IDREF
attribute type. While a particular value may only appear once in a document as an 
ID
type, 
it may appear any number of times as the value of an 
IDREF
or 
IDREFS
attribute. In particular, 
attributes of those types may only take values that also appear as the value of an 
ID
attribute 
somewhere  in  the  same  document.  (An 
IDREFS
attribute  can  take  a  value  that  is  a  space-
separated list of 
ID
values, each of which must exist in the document.) These values can be used 
to forge internal links between elements that a validating parser must check. This can be very 
convenient when a basic tree structure is not sufficient to model your data; the 
ID
IDREF
, and 
IDREFS
attributes can be used to extend the data model to include connected, directed graphs 
with typed arcs.  
2.7 Canonical XML 
The term canonicalization originally  was  "borrowed"  loosely from its more  ancient 
context to indicate that one structure of an instance document is the same as the 
master,  or  commonly  accepted,  structure  of  the  document.  Canonicalization  is 
sometimes referred to as C14N for brevity; this is similar to the more common use of 
I18N for internationalization.  
Canonical XML is an emerging W3C recommendation that allows you to see if one 
physical  representation  of  a  document  is  equivalent  to  another  physical 
representation of the same document in order to determine if they are "canonically" 
equivalent. In this section, we explore some of the technical features of Canonical 
XML to gain a better understanding of its application to suit your needs.  
2.7.1 The Canonical XML Data Model 
To begin the process of converting a document to canonical form, you, or rather your 
Canonical XML processor, must start with some form of XML that it can understand. 
Therefore, your first parameter to a canonical translator should be an XPath node set, 
or  a  serialized  XML  document.  The  second  parameter  is  a  Boolean  value,  which 
indicates whether comments should be analyzed.  
In the case of a node set, it must have normalized line feeds, normalized attribute 
values,  substituted  CDATA  sections  with  their  character  content,  and  resolved 
character  and parsed entity references. In  other  words,  each  node must  be  fully 
cooked.  No  stranded  entities  and  no  superfluous  whitespace  are  allowed.  All 
whitespace within the root element must be preserved with the exception of line-
delimiter normalization. The whole approach leads you to think that the document is 
being worked over—flattened, stretched, and pulled like  pizza dough just  prior  to 
being cooked.  
2.7.2 Document Order 
Although Canonical XML depends on XPath, it imposes a few rules on the XPath node 
sets that are sent into any Canonical XML processor.  
An element's namespace and attribute nodes must follow the element but precede any children.  
Namespace nodes must exist prior to attribute nodes. 
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures. Overview. XDoc.PDF also allows PDF security setting via digital signature.
add signature to pdf document; create signature pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF file. What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on PDF using C# code. Create
adding signature to pdf doc; create signature field in pdf
IT-SC book 
51
Namespace nodes for an element are sorted lexicographically by local name.  
Attribute nodes for an element are sorted lexicographically with the namespace URI as a primary 
key and the local name as a secondary key.  
2.7.3 Canonical XML Structure 
Canonical XML does away with the XML declaration and DTD, and also normalizes whitespace 
outside of the root element. Abbreviated empty elements (in the style of 
<element-name/>
) are 
converted to start- and end-tag pairs (
<element-name></element-name>
). Namespace and 
attributes  may  be  lexicographically  reorganized  to  comply  with  canonical  expectations  as 
described  in 
Section  2.7.2
 In  addition  to  these  modifications,  a  canonical  representation 
replaces  CDATA  sections  with  their  actual  characters,  and  applies  character  reference 
replacement  when  appropriate.  Attribute  values  and  text  also  have  their  special  characters 
replaced with references.  
Canonical XML is quite new, and we have yet to see significant amounts of Python 
software developed for Canonical  XML  processing.  The  vision of  Canonical  XML  is 
blurry, but it is a method for checking two instances (regardless of DTD or Schema) 
and working them over like cleaned fish to see if they share the same skeletons. 
Version 0.7 of PyXML will include support for rendering XML in canonical form.  
2.8 Going Beyond the XML Specification 
The  standards  developed  at  the  W3C  ensure  interoperability  between  distributed 
systems and the applications developers around the world. As we progress in this 
book  from  XML  tools  and  strategies  in  your  local  applications  to  distributed 
application development, several new XML terms and issues come into the forefront.  
2.8.1 XML Namespaces 
As discussed in 
Section 1.2.2
in 
Chapter 1
, namespaces provide a means to combine elements 
from different knowledge domains or schemas. The Namespaces specification accomplishes this 
by allowing element and attribute names to be qualified with a URI; every URI corresponds to a 
unique namespace. Namespaces are used for several purposes in practice, but the most important 
is to allow a document to contain elements defined by different schema (possibly originating from 
different organizations) without having naming conflicts.  
Namespaces  are  used  by  associating  a  named 
xmlns
attribute  with  a  URI.  Namespaces  are 
communicated  in an XML document using the reserved colon character in an element  name, 
prefixed with the 
xmlns
symbol. For example:  
<sumc:purchaseOrder refnum="389473984-38844" 
xmlns:sumc="http://www.superultramegacorp.com"> 
<sumc:product name="Magical Widget" sku="398-4993833"> 
<sumc:qty value="24">One Case Order</sumc:qty> 
<sumc:amount value="34.56">34.56</sumc:amount> 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
pdf secure signature; create pdf signature box
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
for C# .NET, users can convert PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) online, convert Users can perform text signature adding, freehand signature creation and date signature
create pdf signature; pdf create signature
IT-SC book 
52 
<sumc:shipping value="overnight">Next-day</sumc:shipping> 
</sumc:product> 
</sumc:purchaseOrder> 
In this document, the namespace of 
SuperUltraMegaCorp
is defined. The prefix 
sumc
has been 
associated with it in the 
xmlns:sumc
attribute. Elements prefixed with 
sumc:
are within this 
namespace.  This 
purchaseOrder
now  has  a  context  that  can  set  it  apart  from  a  similarly 
structured purchase order intended for a different business domain.  
2.8.2 Extracting Information Using XPath 
XPath is discussed  at length  in 
Chapter 5
. For now it is  worth a mention, lest  you start  to 
develop your own method for querying XML without understanding what standards are offered. 
XPath offers a standardized method of querying XML for specific information, whether it's a 
single element or node, or a collection of elements. The standardization is of value not when 
you're writing the backend part of your application, but rather when you need to expose search 
capabilities either programmatically or via the web.  
2.8.3 Using XLink to Link XML Documents 
The  XLink  language  allows  for  the  insertion  of  elements  into  XML  documents  to 
create  and  describe  links  between  different  resources.  XLink  uses  XML  syntax  to 
create structures representing links similar to hyperlinks used in HTML, as well as 
more complex linking structures. Link specifications are encoded in the attributes of 
the source document, or in supplemental documents that can describe links among 
other documents. The most common applications embed link information at the link 
source. The target of a link is described using a URI and an XPath expression; the 
URI  specifies  the  target  resource,  and  the  XPath  expression  specifies  a  specific 
location  in  the  linked  resource.  XLink  is  still  a  young  specification  and  is  not 
discussed further in this book.  
2.8.4 Communicating with XML Protocols 
The XML Protocol working group is a W3C group tasked with investigating the development of 
XML-based messaging and communications standards. These standards are attempting to define a 
method  of  packaging  information  and  sending  it  across  the  Internet.  Some  are  focused  on 
transactions, some are focused on guaranteed delivery, and others are focused on routing and 
enveloping mechanisms. The Protocol Activity page (
http://www.w3.org/2000/03/29-XML-
protocol-matrix
) is an excellent online resource for comparing these different protocols when 
developing distributed systems. The Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning specifications 
from the IETF, collectively known as WebDAV, use XML to support interoperable tools for web 
site management and authoring. 
Chapter 9
covers such items as remote procedure calls and web 
services (including SOAP) in greater detail. Additional specifications deal with other aspects of 
distributed computing, especially topics such as authentication and secure communications.  
2.8.5 Replacing HTML with XHTML 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Viewer for C# .NET provides permanent annotations adding feature, all enables you to create signatures to PDF, including freehand signature, text and
add signature image to pdf; pdf will signature
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures in VB to be respected, XDoc.PDF also allows PDF such security setting via digital signature.
copy and paste signature into pdf; add signature to pdf acrobat
IT-SC book 
53
The Extensible Hypertext Markup Language, or XHTML (
http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/
), 
is a welcome gift to those of us who have had to struggle with parsing HTML. Though there is a 
W3C specification for HTML, most implementations conform only partially. This is due in part 
to the growth of HTML from some early implementations rather than a formal specification, and 
also to the browser implementers' attempts to do "the right thing" even with badly broken markup. 
The  attempts  to  force  HTML  to  fit  into  an  SGML  mold  after  the  fact  probably  hindered 
compliance  further,  if  only  because  the  rules  for  parsing  it  became  more  complex  and 
implementers'  don't  like to start  over. When a browser parses HTML,  it  concerns itself  with 
display attributes, not organization of the information in the document. While XHTML doesn't 
change the focus on appearance, it is an XML-based markup language, allowing you to parse it 
with an XML parser. This can drastically reduce the handling time of XHTML. It also allows you 
to  leverage  XHTML  into  other  XML  applications,  as  well  as  use  XML  Namespaces  in 
conjunction with XHTML that has migrated into other domains and systems.  
The  first  version  of  the  XHTML  specification,  XHTML  1.0,  defines  a  monolithic 
document  type  that  corresponds  closely  with  the  HTML  4  specification.  Future 
versions of XHTML, starting with XHTML 1.1, are moving toward a modular approach; 
different  aspects  of  the  language  will  be  defined  in  separate  components,  and 
different applications  will  have the flexibility to  determine which  components they 
support. Part of the intent is to allow browsers with simpler displays, such as mobile 
phones, to avoid having to implement portions of XHTML that do not make sense for 
the application (such as tables for very small textual displays). An additional benefit 
is that application developers can define new modules that allow documents to be 
created that can be used for both presentation to people and improved computer-to-
computer communications.  
2.8.6 Transforming XML with XSLT 
The  XML  Stylesheet  Language,  or  XSL,  consists  of  two  component  specifications:  XSL 
Transformations (XSLT) and XSL Formatting Objects (XSL-FO). The transformation language is 
used to translate XML documents from their original form to some other form, which may be 
XML, HTML, or anything else (including plain text). XSLT is covered in more detail in 
Chapter 
6
. The XSL-FO specification describes specific presentational styling and is used to describe a 
formatted document that could be printed to a typesetting device or displayed on a screen. It is not 
as widely implemented as XSLT and is not covered further in this book.  
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program. How To Tutorials. Password, digital signature and PDF text, image and page redaction
add signature to pdf reader; adding a signature to a pdf document
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to create, edit, and remove PDF bookmark
add signature pdf preview; add signature to pdf preview
IT-SC book 
54 
Chapter 3. The Simple API for XML 
The Simple API for XML, otherwise known as SAX, is a popular interface for working 
with XML data. Let's start by looking at the background and history of SAX, after 
which  we'll  describe the major  components of the interface. Once the overview is 
complete, we can look at several examples to help you see how to use it in your own 
applications.  
3.1 The Birth of SAX 
Before SAX, almost every XML parser offered its own interface, so applications were 
built to use specific parsers. The interfaces were low-level and generally similar in 
structure; the differences were mostly in the details. When new parsers were made 
available,  applications  had  to  be  modified  extensively  to  work  with  the  different 
interface in order to take advantage of the new parser, even though the fundamental 
structure was essentially unchanged.  
As is so often the case, the solution lay in introducing another layer of indirection. A group of 
XML developers using Java, led by David Megginson on the XML-DEV mailing list, defined a 
set of Java interfaces that allowed an application to work with any parser. The only requirement 
was that there be a 
driver
for the new API for each parser. The driver was a class that used the 
parser-specific interface to make calls back to the application using the new, general interface. 
The application would create 
handler
objects that implemented methods the driver would use to 
call back to the application. When Megginson released the specification, he also released a set of 
drivers for many of the more popular Java XML parsers. The initial specification supported the 
XML 1.0 recommendation, but not any of the more complex layers that have been built on top of 
it; the initiatives to create those were largely in their infancy at the time. The group of developers 
called the new API the "Simple API for XML," or SAX, because it was actually simpler than 
most of the parser-specific interfaces it was designed to abstract away.  
The new API was widely received as a major step forward for application writers—it 
was easy to use, allowed the use of arbitrary parsers with an application, and was 
carefully defined before any other common APIs were available. Java programmers 
became  extremely  happy  as  the  stress  levels  dropped  in  their  professional  lives. 
Developers in other languages adapted the specification in ways that allowed SAX to 
remain an identifiable API even as it was made to work with the native conventions 
used in those languages. Python programmers in the XML-SIG, led by Lars Marius 
Garshol,  created  an  adaptation  of  the  API  and  implemented  drivers  for  several 
parsers. This implementation was accepted as part of the PyXML package.  
The W3C then released the Namespaces  recommendation.  This recommendation changed the 
very concept of what constituted a name. While there was great debate over the value of the new 
recommendation, most people recognized that it did solve real problems and that it was here to 
stay.  No one  wanted a return  of having  to  chase  incompatible  APIs, so the  SAX developers 
quickly dug in and worked on a version of SAX that could support Namespaces. The revised API 
is known as SAX2. It is interesting to note that some of the first implementations of namespaces 
were filters written as SAX handlers; the SAX events were used to drive the SAX2 handlers with 
a little bit of processing in the middle to add the Namespaces support. Information on the Java 
version of SAX2 and links to additional SAX resources can be found at the SAX home page at 
http://www.saxproject.org/
.  
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office typing new signature, deleting added signature from the After adding such a control button, with a
add signature pdf online; create pdf signature stamp
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. This smart and mature PDF image adding component of RasterEdge VB.NET PDF
adding signature to pdf in preview; pdf signature stamp
IT-SC book 
55
Python  developers  rapidly  adopted  the  SAX2  interface,  taking  the  opportunity  to 
clean up some warts of the early mapping of SAX from the Java-based specification. 
The SAX2 API rapidly became part of PyXML and was adopted for use in the Python 
standard  library.  When  Python  programmers  speak  of  the  SAX  API,  they  are 
generally referring to the second version.  
3.2 Understanding SAX 
The first job of using SAX is to design and implement a handler that works with your 
specific XML documents. When dealing with a large project or working with a vast 
catalogue of valid documents, it may make sense to implement a few comprehensive 
handlers to deal with multiple document types. However, for smaller projects, it may 
be more desirable to implement handlers for each specific document type that you 
encounter. As  you start  to build more complex applications, you will see that  the 
things  you're  attempting  to  do  with  the  XML  as  well  as  the  XML  documents 
themselves can drive the way you develop your document handlers. Often, the SAX 
methods  that you implement  extract data  from  the  event  stream, which you can 
then hand  off to another application  (such  as a database). Or  you might want to 
apply  intelligent  business  logic  to  it.  It's  likely  that  the  task  will  drive  your 
development strategy.  
In  all practical use, SAX  is  a  callback-based  API in  which  you  implement handler 
objects to process XML. You pass a reference to your SAX handler objects to a SAX-
capable parser (or driver; we'll use "parser" to refer to either). When parsing begins, 
the parser calls the methods on your handler objects and allows you to process the 
XML, so that you can do something useful with it in your applications and distributed 
systems.  
SAX is an excellent stream-based API. It allows for faster processing of documents, 
as well  as handling  of  documents that  are  simply too large to  load into  memory. 
Additionally, the event-based API allows you to react to parsing events and errors in 
"real-time," as they occur, while parsing the document, rather than waiting for the 
entire document to load. This can be especially valuable when used in a graphical 
application that needs to remain responsive to the user. Another huge win for many 
applications is the lower memory consumption when compared to DOM-based code; 
by  allowing  the  application  control  over  any  objects  created  during  parsing,  the 
application can minimize the needed storage overhead and discard objects as soon 
as they are no longer required.  
SAX  is  the interface to  use  when  you  need  to  construct some  application-specific 
data structures from one or more documents, but you don't need to maintain the 
XML  structure  within  your  application.  Since  SAX  reports  low-level  events  to  the 
handlers  installed  by  the  application,  the  programmer  needs  to  be  careful  about 
keeping track of the application state during parsing—it lends itself toward modeling 
the application as a state machine. Fortunately, the programmer is not required to 
pay a high memory or a performance penalty, which is often associated with loading 
potentially  large documents. This would be  difficult to avoid when using the DOM 
interface, which usually keeps the entire document tree in memory until the tree is 
discarded. (We look at the DOM in detail in the next chapter.)  
3.2.1 Using SAX in an Application 
IT-SC book 
56 
When an application is built using SAX, it can be helpful to think of the application as a set of 
components. The XML parser itself, including the SAX driver, is a black-box component that 
only needs a small amount of control information from the application. The handler objects are 
the only way for the XML parser to communicate with the application, but the logic they contain 
should  be  more  concerned  with  interpreting  the  events  reported  by  the  parser  than  in 
implementing  the application—these often form a separate layer that provides  the application 
with the data model it needs. The application itself uses the derived data structures and higher-
level events from the handler objects to perform the real work of the application. The relationship 
of these components is shown in 
Figure 3-1
.  
Figure 3-1. Components of a SAX application 
For smaller applications, it is common for the application and the handlers to be the 
same objects,  often with the application  code in  the  callback methods. While  this 
does  not work well  for  larger  applications, it  is a  reasonable approach  for  simple 
applications. While learning about SAX, it offers excellent pedagogical side effects as 
well,  so  our  examples  embed  the  application  code  directly  in  the  handler 
implementations. It is not difficult to see how to create abstractions between the SAX 
handler objects and a larger application.  
SAX refers to the parser object as a 
reader
. It reads input from some source and generates calls 
to the handler methods for particular events in the input. (There isn't any requirement that the 
source be an XML document, though it usually is.) The application registers handler objects using 
methods on the reader, and may set some additional properties of the parser. In our overview of 
the API, we start by examining the handler objects that can be provided to the parser and then 
take a quick look at the reader interface.  
3.2.2 SAX Handler Objects 
SAX is composed of four primary interfaces that are called by parsers for the different events that 
are encountered during the parsing phase. Python has tailored these methods slightly (mostly by 
using Python's more powerful native data types) from its native Java to faithfully implement SAX 
in the Python environment. By implementing the different interfaces of the callback API, you can 
receive all the events generated by the parser as it encounters the different parts of the XML 
document.  Let's  take  a  quick  look  at  the different  handler  objects  that  can  be  implemented. 
(Complete reference information on the methods invoked by the parser for each object is given in 
Appendix C
.)  
3.2.2.1 ContentHandler 
IT-SC book 
57
The 
ContentHandler
interface is the most commonly used of all SAX interfaces, and is the 
primary way in which your applications receive parsing events. Parsing events are geared towards 
the primary markup and character data present in documents. Tell your SAX-capable parser about 
your implementation of this interface via the 
setContentHandler
method.  
The callback API is the part of SAX that users of XML are most interested in. This is the API that 
you implement to receive the stream of events generated by the parser. As each element comes 
through, it triggers the parser to call a 
startElement
method on the handler you implemented. 
The 
startElement
handler, designed for  the  XML in use, must know  what to do with any 
element it encounters in the document:  
def startElement(self, name, attrs): 
if name == "webArticle": 
subcat = attrs["subcategory"] 
if subcat.find("tech") > -1: 
self.inArticle = 1 
self.isMatch = 1 
elif self.inArticle: 
if name == "header": 
self.title = attrs["title"] 
self.inBody = 1 
if name == "body": 
self.inBody = 1 
3.2.2.2 ErrorHandler 
The 
ErrorHandler
interface allows applications to respond to errors encountered by the parser 
at runtime. This object must be registered with the reader object (using 
setErrorHandler
) to 
be  effective. All  parse  errors  are  classified  into  three  categories based  on  their  severity;  the 
handler object implements a different method for each level of severity. The least severe errors 
are passed to the 
warning
method, while real violations of the specifications are passed to the 
error
method  if the parser can  continue to look for  additional errors in  the  input. They are 
passed to 
fatalError
if this is not possible.  
Each  of  these  methods  receives  a  single  parameter,  which  is  always  an  instance  of  the 
SAXException
interface. This interface offers a number of methods to allow information about 
the error to be retrieved, including where the error occurred and in which input source. If the 
handler decides to terminate processing, the 
SAXException
object can simply be raised as an 
exception.  
IT-SC book 
58 
If  you  do  not  supply  an  error  handler,  the  default  behavior  is  to  print  an  error  message  to 
sys.stdout
for warnings, and to raise the exception for both normal and fatal errors.  
If you have installed the PyXML package, a couple of convenient implementations are provided 
in the 
xml.sax.saxutils
module. The 
ErrorPrinter
class is an error handler that prints a 
report of the error on standard output, regardless of the severity. The 
ErrorRaiser
simply raises 
the exception, so errors always terminate processing.  
3.2.2.3 DTDHandler 
When an application needs to know about notations and unparsed entities, it can use the SAX 
parser's 
setDTDHandler
method to specify a 
DTDHandler
object to receive this information. 
Objects  with  this  interface  need  only  implement  two  interfaces—one  to  receive  notation 
definitions, and one to receive entity definitions. Only definitions of unparsed entities (entities 
with specified notations) are passed to this interface.  
While this doesn't sound like it covers much of the information specified in a DTD, it 
does  cover  what  an  application  is  normally  expected  to  need  if  using  unparsed 
entities. Remember, the "S" in SAX stands for "Simple"—most applications do not 
actually need the details of the content models and other entity definitions. If you do 
need more information from the DTD, many mechanisms are available:  
The optional SAX 
DeclHandler
handler, which may not be supported by all parsers  
The native interface of the Expat parser; see the documentation for the standard library module 
xml.parsers.expat
The xml.parsers.xmlproc.dtdparser
module from PyXML 
3.2.2.4 EntityResolver 
This handler, if implemented, must also be registered with the parser prior to parsing, using the 
parser's 
setEntityResolver
method. When the parser encounters external entities, it calls the 
resolveEntity
method in your implementation. Application developers can use this method to 
point the parser at an alternative location to resolve entities, such as a cache. If it returns 
None
or 
a system identifier, the parser tries to load the entity using the basic facilities for HTTP and FTP 
provided by the Python standard library.  
3.2.2.5 Other handler objects 
There are actually two more handler objects defined for use with SAX, but these are 
considered  optional  and  do  no  have  methods  on  the  parser  to  set  them  as 
conveniently. Most applications will not need these, but being aware of them helps 
when they are needed.  
DeclHandler  
An object with methods that are called when the parser encounters definitions 
of the structural model of the document. The methods are called for element 
and attribute declarations, and for declarations of both internal and external 
entities.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested