c# pdf to tiff : Adding a signature to a pdf form software Library dll windows asp.net web page web forms python3handson5-part1804

1.15. SUMMARY
51
(h) format(expression, formatString) [1.14.1]
If expression is numeric, the format string can be in the form ’.#f’, where the # gets replaced
by a nonnegative integer, and the result is a string with the value of the expression rounded
to the specified number of digits beyond the decimal point.
(16) Functions defined by a user:
def functionName ( parameter1, parameter2, and so on) :
consistently indented statement block, which may include a return statement
(a) There may be any number of parameters. The parentheses must be included even if there are
no parameters. [1.11.4]
(b) When a function is first defined, it is only remembered: its lines are not executed. [1.11.2]
(c) When the function is later called in other code, the actual parameters in the function call are
used to initialize the local variables parameter1, parameter2, and so on in the same order as
the actual parameters. [1.11.4]
(d) The local variables of a function are independent of the local names of any function defined
outside of this function. The local variables must be initialized before use, and the names lose
any association with their values when the function execution terminates. [1.11.8]
(e) If a return statement is reached, any further statements in the function are ignored. [1.11.6]
(f) Functions should be used to :
(i) Emphasize that the code corresponds to one idea and give an easily recognizable name.
[1.11.2]
(ii) Avoid repetition. If a basic idea is repeated with just the data changing, it will be easier
to follow and use if it is coded once as a function with parameters, that gets called with
the appropriate actual parameters when needed. [1.11.4]
(iii) It is good to separate the internal processing of data from the input and output of data.
This typically means placing the processing of data and the return of the result in a
function. [1.11.4]
(iv) Separate responsibilities: The consumer of a function only needs to know the name,
parameter usage, and meaning of any returned value. Only the writer of a function
needs to know the implementation of a function. [1.11.7]
(17) Modules (program files)
(a) A module may start with a documentation string. [1.9.4]
(b) Define your functions in your module. If the module is intended as a main program called only
one way, a convention is make your execution just be calling a function called main. [1.11.3]
(c) Avoid defining variable outside of your functions. Names for constant (unchanging) values are
areasonable exception. [1.11.9]
(18) Documentation String: A string, often a multi-line (triple quoted) string that may appear in two
places:
(a) At the very beginning of a file: This should give overall introductory information about the
file [1.9.4]
(b) As the very first entry in the body of a function: This should describe: [1.12.1]
(i) The return value of the function (if there is one)
(ii) Anything about the parameters that is not totally obvious from the names
(iii) Anything about the results from the function that is not obvious from the name
(19) Programming Patterns
(a) Input-calculate-Output: This is the simplest overall program model. First obtain all the data
you need (for instance by prompting the user for keyboard input). Calculate what you need
from this data. Output the data (for instance to the screen with print functions). [??]
(b) Repetitive patterns: These patterns are all associated with loops. Loops are essential if the
number of repetitions depends on dynamic data in the program. Even if you could avoid a
loop by repeating code, a loop is usually a better choice to make the repetitive logic of your
program clear to all.
(i) Exact repetition some number of times: If the number of time to repeat is n:
for i in range(n):
actions to be repeated
Adding a signature to a pdf form - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
adding signature to pdf document; create a pdf signature file
Adding a signature to a pdf form - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
pdf signature stamp; adding signature to pdf doc
1.15. SUMMARY
52
Here the variable i is included only because there must be a variable name in a for-loop.
[1.13.5]
(ii) For-each loop: Do the same sort of thing for each item in a specified sequence. [1.13.4]
for item in sequence :
actions to be done with each item
(iii) Successive modification loop: Repeat a basic idea, but where the data involved each
time changes via a pattern that is coded in the loop to convert the previous data into
the data needed the next time through the loop [1.13.6]:
initialize all variables that will be successively modified in the loop
loop heading for the repetition :
actions to be in each loop with the current variable values
modify the variable values to prepare for the next time through the loop
(iv) Accumulation loop: A sequence of items need to be combined. This works where the
accumulation of all the items can be approached incrementally, combining one after
another with the accumulation so far [1.13.7]:
initialize the accumulation to include none of the sequence
for item in sequence :
new value of accumulation =
result of combining item with last value of accumulation
(20) Playing computer: testing that you understand your code (and it works right or helping you find
where it goes wrong) [1.13.1,1.13.6, 1.13.8]
(a) Make sure line numbers are labeled
(b) Make a table with heading for line numbers, all variables that will be changing, and comments
(c) Follow the order of execution, one statement at a time, being careful to update variable values
and only use the latest variable values, and carefully following the flow of control through
loops and into and out of function calls.
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures. Overview. XDoc.PDF also allows PDF security setting via digital signature.
add signature field to pdf; pdf to word converter sign in
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF file. What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on PDF using C# code. Create
pdf export sign in; adding a signature to a pdf form
CHAPTER 2
Objects and Methods
2.1. Strings, Part III
2.1.1. Object Orientation. Python is an object-oriented language. Every piece of data and even func-
tions and types are objects. The term object-oriented is used to distinguish Python from earlier languages,
classified as procedural languages, where types of data and the operations on them were not connected in the
language. The functions we have used so far follow the older procedural programming syntax. In the newer
paradigm of object-oriented programming, all data are in objects, and a core group of operations that can
be done on some particular type of object are tightly bound to the object and called the object’s methods.
For example, strings are objects, and strings “know how” to produce an uppercase version of themselves.
Try in the Shell:
s = ’Hello!’
s.upper()
Here upper is a method associated with strings. This means upper is a function that is bound to the string
before the dot. This function is bound both logically, and as we see in the new notation, also syntactically.
One way to think about it is that each type of data knows operations (methods) that can be applied to it.
The expression s.upper() calls the method upper that is bound to the string s and returns a new uppercase
string result based on s.
Strings are immutable, so no string method can change the original string, it can only return a new
string. Confirm this by entering each line individually in the Shell to see the original s is unchanged:
s
s2 = s.upper()
s2
s
We are using the new object syntax:
object.method( )
meaning that the method associated with the object’s type is applied to the object. This is just a special
syntax for a function call with an object.
Another string method is lower, analogous to upper, but producing a lowercase result.
Test yourself: How would you write the expression to produce a lowercase version of the string s? An-
swer:
1
Try it in the Shell.
Test yourself in the Shell: How would you use this string s and both the lower and upper methods to
create the string ’hello!HELLO!’ ? Hint:
2
Answer:
3
Many methods also take additional parameters between the parentheses, using the more general syntax
object.method(parameters)
The first of many such methods we will introduce is count:
Syntax for count:
1
s.lower()
2
Use a plus sign to concatenate the pieces.
3
s.lower() + s.upper()
53
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
add a signature to a pdf file; create signature field in pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
for C# .NET, users can convert PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) online, convert Users can perform text signature adding, freehand signature creation and date signature
pdf create signature; pdf to word converter sign in
2.1. STRINGS, PART III
54
s.count(sub)
Count and return the number of repetitions of a string sub that appear as substrings inside the string s.
Read and make sure you see the answers are correct:
>>> tale = ’This is the best of times.’
>>> tale.count(’i’)
3
>>> tale.count(’is’)
2
>>> tale.count(’That’)
0
>>> tale.count(’ ’)
5
There is a blank between the quotes in the line above. Blanks are characters like any other (except you can’t
see them)!
Just as the parameter can be replaced by a literal or any expression, the object to which a method is
bound with the dot may also be given by a literal, or a variable name, or any expression that evaluates to
the right kind of object in its place. This is true for any method call.
Technically the dot between the object and the method name is an operator, and operators have different
levels of precedence. It is important to realize that this dot operator has the highest possible precedence.
Read and see the difference parentheses make in the expressions:
>>> ’hello ’ + ’there’.upper()
’hello THERE’
>>> (’hello ’ + ’there’).upper()
’HELLO THERE’
To see if you understand this precedence, predict the results of each line and then test in the Shell:
3 * ’X’.count(’XXX’)
(3 * ’X’).count(’XXX’)
There are 0 ’XXX’s in ’X’, but 1 ’XXX’ in ’XXX’.
Python lets you see all the methods that are bound to an object (and any object of its type) with the
built-in function dir. To see all string methods, supply the dir function with any string. For example, try
in the Shell:
dir(’’)
Many of the names in the list start and end with two underscores, like __add__. These are all associated
with methods and pieces of data used internally by the Python interpreter. You can ignore them for now.
The remaining entries in the list are all user-level methods for strings. You should see lower and upper
among them. Some of the methods are much more commonly used than others.
Object notation
object.method(parameters)
has been illustrated so far with just the object type str, but it applies to all types. Later in the tutorial
methods such as the following will be discussed:
If seq is a list, seq.append(element) appends element to the end of the list.
If myData is a file, myData.read() will read and return the entire contents of the file....
2.1.2. String Indices. A string is a sequence of smaller components (individual characters), and it is
often useful to deal with parts of strings. Python indexes the characters in a string, starting from 0, so for
instance, the characters in the string ’computer’ have indices:
character
c
o
m
p
u
t
e
r
index
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Each index is associated with a character, and you reference the individual characters much like in a
dictionary. Try the following. (You can skip the comments that make the indices explicit.) Enter in the
Shell:
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Viewer for C# .NET provides permanent annotations adding feature, all enables you to create signatures to PDF, including freehand signature, text and
add signature to pdf file; adding a signature to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures in VB to be respected, XDoc.PDF also allows PDF such security setting via digital signature.
pdf sign; export pdf to word sign in
2.1. STRINGS, PART III
55
#
01234567
s = ’computer’
s[0]
s[5]
s[8]
You cannot refer directly to a character that is not there. Indices only go to 7 in the example above.
Recall the len function, which gives the length of a sequence. It works on strings. Guess the following
value, and test in the Shell:
len(s)
Acommon error is to think the last index will be the same as the length of the string, but as you saw above,
that leads to an execution error. If the length of some string is 5, what is the index of its last character?
What if the length is 35?
Hopefully you did not count by ones all the way from 0. The indices for a string of length n are the
elements of the sequence range(n), which goes from 0 through n-1, or the length of the string minus one,
which is 5-1=4 or 35-1 = 34 in these examples.
Sometimes you are interested in the last few elements of a string and do not want to do calculations like
this. Python makes it easy. You can index from the right end of the string. Since positive integers are used
to index from the front, negative integers are used to index from the right end, so the more complete table
of indices for ’computer’ gives two alternatives for each character:
character
c
o
m
p
u
t
e
r
index
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
index from the right end
-8
-7
-6
-5
-4
-3
-2
-1
Predict and test each individual line, continuing in the Shell:
s[-1]
s[-3]
s[-10]
it = ’horse’
len(it)
it[-1]
it[1]
Be careful - remember what the initial index is!
2.1.3. String Slices. It is also useful to extract larger pieces of a string than a single character. That
brings us to slices. Try this expression using slice notation, continuing in the Shell:
s[0:4]
Note that s[4] is the first character past the slice. The simplest syntax for a slice of a string s is:
s[startIndex : pastIndex]
This refers to the substring of s starting at index startIndex and stopping just before index pastIndex. It
confuses many people that the index after the colon is not the index of the final character in the slice, but
that is the system. Predict and try each line individually in the Shell:
s[2:5]
s[1:3]
If you omit the first index, the slice starts from the beginning. If you omit the second index, the slice goes
all the way to the end. Predict and try each line individually in the Shell:
s[:3]
s[5:]
Predict and try each line individually in the Shell:
word = ’program’
word[2:4]
word[1:-3]
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program. How To Tutorials. Password, digital signature and PDF text, image and page redaction
create signature from pdf; add signature pdf online
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to create, edit, and remove PDF bookmark
create transparent signature stamp for pdf; create pdf with signature field
2.1. STRINGS, PART III
56
word[3:]
word[3:3]
word[:1] + word[4:]
Python evaluates slices in a more forgiving manner than when indexing single characters. In a slice, if you
give an index past a limit of where it could be, Python assumes you mean the actual end. Predict and try
each line individually in the Shell:
word[:9]
word[8:10]
Enter a slice expression using the variable word from above that produces ’gra’.
Auseful string method that uses the ideas of indices and slices is find.
Syntax options for find:
s.find(sub)
s.find(sub, start)
s.find(sub, start, end)
Return the integer index in the string s of the beginning of first complete occurrence of the substring sub. If
sub does not appear inside s, return -1. The value -1 would be an impossible result if sub were found, so if -1
is returned, sub must not have been found. If parameters start and end are not included in the parameter
list, the search is through the whole string s. If an integer value is given for start, the search starts at index
start. If an integer value is given for end, the search ends before index end. In other words if start and end
appear, then the search is through the slice s[start : end], but the index returned is still counted from the
beginning of s.
For example, check that the following make sense. The comment line is just there to help you count:
>>> #
01234567890
>>> s = ’Mississippi’
>>> s.find(’i’)
1
>>> s.find(’si’)
3
>>> s.find(’sa’)
-1
>>> s.find(’si’, 4)
6
Predict and try each line in the Shell:
#
0123456789012
line = ’Hello, there!’
line.find(’e’)
line.find(’he’)
line.find(’e’, 10)
line.find(’he’, 10)
We will consider more string methods later, but we can already do useful things with the ones introduced.
Inside the Shell, you can look up documentation on any of the methods listed with the dir function.
Here is a place that you want to refer to the method itself, not invoke the method, so note that you get
help for s.find not for s.find(). Assuming you defined the string s in the Shell earlier, try in the Shell
help(s.find)
The Python documentation uses square brackets to indicate optional elements that get a default value if you
leave them out. This shortens the syntax descriptions.
If you want method documentation when you do not have a variable of the type created, you can also
use the type name. Try in the Shell:
dir(str)
help(str.capitalize)
Indexing and slicing works on any kind of Python sequence, so you can index or slice lists also. Read this
Shell session:
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office typing new signature, deleting added signature from the After adding such a control button, with a
pdf signatures; click to sign pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. This smart and mature PDF image adding component of RasterEdge VB.NET PDF
add signature to pdf document; adding signature to pdf form
2.1. STRINGS, PART III
57
>>> vals = [5, 7, 9, 22, 6, 8]
>>> vals[1]
7
>>> vals[-2]
6
>>> vals[1:4]
[7, 9, 22]
Unlike strings, lists are mutable, as you will see in Section 2.2.1. Indices and slices can also be used in
assignment statements to change lists, but in this tutorial we not need list indexing, and we will not discuss
this subject further.
2.1.4. Index Variables. All the concrete examples in the last two sections used literal numbers for
the indices. That is fine for learning the idea, but in practice, variables or expressions are almost always
used for indices. As usual the variable or expression is evaluated before being used. Try in Idle and see that
the example program index1.py makes sense:
s = ’word’
print(’The full string is: ’, s)
n = len(s)
for i in range(n):
print()
print(’i =’, i)
print(’The letter at index i:’, s[i])
print(’The part before index i (if any):’, s[:i])
print(’The part before index i+2:’, s[:i+2])
We will use index variables in more practical situations as we explain more operations with strings.
2.1.5. split. Syntax options for the split method with a string s:
s.split()
s.split(sep)
The first version splits s at any sequence of whitespace (blanks, newlines, tabs) and returns the remaining
parts of s as a list. If a string sep is specified, it is the separator that gets removed from between the parts
of the list.
For example, read and follow:
>>> tale = ’This is the best of times.’
>>> tale.split()
[’This’, ’is’, ’the’, ’best’, ’of’, ’times.’]
>>> s = ’Mississippi’
>>> s.split(’i’)
[’M’, ’ss’, ’ss’, ’pp’, ’’]
>>> s.split() # no white space
[’Mississippi’]
Predict and test each line in the Shell:
line = ’Go: Tear some strings apart!’
seq = line.split()
seq
line.split(’:’)
line.split(’ar’)
lines = ’This includes\nsome new\nlines.’
lines.split()
2.1. STRINGS, PART III
58
2.1.6. join. Join is roughly the reverse of split. It joins together a sequence of strings. The syntax is
rather different. The separator sep comes first, since it has the right type (a string).
Syntax for the join method:
sep.join(sequence)
Return a new string obtained by joining together the sequence of strings into one string, interleaving the
string sep between sequence elements.
For example (continuing in the Shell from the previous section, using seq):
>>> ’ ’.join(seq)
’Go: Tear some strings apart!’
>>> ’’.join(seq)
’Go:Tearsomestringsapart!’
>>> ’//’.join(seq)
’Go://Tear//some//strings//apart!’
Predict and try each line, continuing in the Shell:
’##’.join(seq)
’:’.join([’one’, ’two’, ’three’])
The methods split and join are often used in sequence:
Exercise 2.1.6.1. * Write a program underscores.py that would input a phrase from the user and
print out the phrase with the white space between words replaced by an underscore. For instance if the input
is "the best one", then it would print "the_best_one". The conversion can be done in one or two statements
using the recent string methods.
Exercise 2.1.6.2. ** An acronym is a string of capital letters formed by taking the first letters from
aphrase. For example, SADD is an acronym for ’students against drunk driving’. Note that the acronym
should be composed of all capital letters even if the original words are not. Write a program acronym.py
that has the user input a phrase and then prints the corresponding acronym.
To get you started, here are some things you will need to do. First check that you understand the basic
syntax to accomplish the different individual tasks: Indicate the proper syntax using a Python function or
operation will allow you to accomplish each task. Invent appropriate variable names for the different parts.
This is not complete instructions! the idea is to make sure you know the basic syntax to use in all these
situations. See the questions after the list to help you put together the final program.
(1) What type of data will the input be? What type of data will the output be?
(2) Get the phrase from the user.
(3) Convert to upper case.
(4) Divide the phrase into words.
(5) Initialize a new empty list, letters.
(6) Get the first letter of each word.
(7) Append the first letter to the list letters.
(8) Join the letters together, with no space between them.
(9) Print the acronym.
Which of these steps is in a loop? What for statement controls this loop?
Put these ideas together and write and test your program acronym.py. Make sure you use names for
the objects that are consistent from one line to the next! (You might not have done that when you first
considered the syntax and ideas needed for 1-9 above individually.)
2.1.7. Further Exploration: As the dir(’’) list showed, there are many more operations on strings
than we have discussed, and there are further variations of the ones above with more parameters. If you want
to reach a systematic reference from inside Idle, go to Help-> Python Docs, select Library Reference, and
Section 2.3 Built-in Types, and then Section 2.3.6.1, String Methods. (This depends on you being attached
to the Internet, or having idle configured to look at a local copy of the official Python documentation.) Many
methods use features we have not discussed yet, but currently accessible methods are capitalize, title,
strip, rfind, replace....
2.2. MORE CLASSES AND METHODS
59
2.2. More Classes and Methods
The classes and methods introduced here are all used for the revised mad lib program developed in the
next section.
2.2.1. Appending to a List. Before making a version of the madlib program that is much easier to
use with new stories, we need a couple of facts about other types of objects that are built into Python.
So far we have used lists, but we have not changed the contents of lists. The most obvious way to change
alist is to add a new element onto the end. Lists have the method append. It modifies the original list.
Another word for modifiable is mutable. Lists are mutable. Most of the types of object considered so far
(int, str, float) are immutable or not mutable. Read and see how the list named words changes:
>>> words = list()
>>> words
[]
>>> words.append(’animal’)
>>> words
[’animal’]
>>> words.append(’food’)
>>> words
[’animal’, ’food’]
>>> words.append(’city’)
>>> words
[’animal’, ’food’, ’city’]
This is particularly useful in a loop, where we can accumulate a new list. Read the start of this simple
example:
def multipleAll(numList, multiplier):
’’’Return a new list containing all of the elements of numList,
each multiplied by multiplier. For example:
>>> print(multipleAll([3, 1, 7], 5))
[15, 5, 35]
’’’
# more to come
Clearly this will be repetitious. We will process each element of the list numList. A for-each loop with
numList is appropriate. Also we need to create more and more elements of the new list. The accumulation
pattern will work here, with a couple of wrinkles.
Test yourself: If we are going to accumulate a list. How do we initialize the list?
In earlier versions of the accumulation loop, we needed an assignment statement to change the object
doing the accumulating, but now the method append modifies its list automatically, so we do not need an
assignment statement. Read and try the example program multiply.py:
def multipleAll(numList, multiplier):
#1
’’’Return a new list containing all of the elements of numList,
each multiplied by multiplier. For example:
>>> print(multipleAll([3, 1, 7], 5))
[15, 5, 35]
’’’
newList = list()
#2
for num in numList:
#3
newList.append(num*multiplier)
#4
return newList
#5
2.2. MORE CLASSES AND METHODS
60
print(multipleAll([3, 1, 7], 5))
#6
Make sure the result makes sense to you or follow the details of playing computer below.
Line
numList
multiplier
newList
num
comment
1-5
-
-
-
-
definition
6
-
-
-
-
call function
1
[3, 1, 7
5
-
set formal parameters
2
[3, 1, 7
5
[]
3
[3, 1, 7
5
[]
3
first in list
4
[3, 1, 7
5
[15]
3
append 3*5 = 15
3
[3, 1, 7
5
[15]
1
next in list
4
[3, 1, 7
5
[15, 5]
1
append 1*5 = 5
3
[3, 1, 7
5
[15, 5]
7
last in list
4
[3, 1, 7
5
[15, 5, 35]
7
append 7*5 = 35
3
[3, 1, 7
5
[15, 5, 35]
7
done with list and loop
5
[3, 1, 7
5
[15, 5, 35]
7
return [15, 5, 35]
6
-
-
-
-
print [15, 3, 35]
Using a for-loop and append is a powerful and flexible way to derive a new list, but not the only way.
4
2.2.2. Sets. A list may contain duplicates, as in [2, 1, 3, 2, 5, 5, 2]. This is sometimes useful,
and sometimes not. You may have learned in math class that a set is a collection that does not allow
repetitions (a set automatically removes repetitions suggested). Python has a type set. Like many type
names, it can be used to convert other types. In this case it makes sense to convert any collection, and the
process removes duplicates.Read and see what happens:
>>> numberList = [2, 1, 3, 2, 5, 5, 2]
>>> aSet = set(numberList)
>>> aSet
{1, 2, 3, 5}
Set literals are enclosed in braces. Like other collections, a set can be used as a sequence in a for-loop.
Read, and check it makes sense:
>>> for item in aSet:
print(item)
1
2
3
5
Predict the result of the following, and then paste it into the Shell and test. (Technically, a set is unordered,
so you may not guess Python’s order, but see if you can get the right length and the right elements in some
order.)
set([’animal’, ’food’, ’animal’, ’food’, ’food’, ’city’])
2.2.3. Constructors. We have now seen several examples of the name of a type being used as a
function. Read these earlier examples:
x = int(’123’)
s = str(123)
4
There is also a concise syntax called list comprehension that allows you to derive a new list from a given sequence. In
the example above, we could describe what happens in English as “make newList contain twice each number in numList”. This
is quite directly translated into an assignment with a list comprehension:
newList = [2*num for num in numList]
This is a lot like mathematical set definition notation, except without Greek symbols. List comprehensions also have fancier
options, but they are not covered in this tutorial.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested