AN INTERLOCKING SYSTEM OF GLOBAL AND REGIONAL SECURITY FOR R2P: ARE WE THERE YET?
21
the risks of institutional competition are rather minimal. In sum, resource pooling of organizations with comprehensive 
security capabilities is more effective because it provides for more interaction opportunities with partner organizations 
and better accounts for the complex challenges on the ground. 
Calling for stronger and more effective inter-institutional links 
Increasingly links between IOs are becoming more institutionalized. The number of joint meetings between the UN 
Security Council and regional equivalents is increasing, joint tasks forces and working groups have been established. 
However, there remains a need for creative thinking about what principles and concrete steps are required to enable a 
truly inter-locking and effective governance system enacting R2P. 
Some basic principles 
So far issues of inter-organizationalism are only a niche topic not systematically addressed by IOs or international rela-
tions research. From a policy perspective a logical starting position should aim at asking the question how institutional 
frameworks should look like to effectively achieve a commonly defined purpose, the implementation of R2P. Instead most 
IO action is reactive to emerging crises based on individual capabilities and interests but without much convergence 
between actors as the Libyan case has shown. This paper argues that inter-organizationalism should be based on col-
lective responsibility and inclusive problem solving. This can best be achieved if actors have comprehensive capabilities 
addressing the full cycle of R2P issues. 
Under conditions of resource scarcity the duplication of capabilities can be assumed to have largely positive effects 
because there is only a small basis for competition but the chances for resource pooling are increasing. Furthermore, 
duplication of effort across various actors combined with effective resource pooling can ideally lead to shared respon-
sibilities and political inclusiveness, conditions which have been missing in the Libyan example. In principle duplication 
of comprehensive security does not rule out division of labor between IOs. Collective and inclusive action remains intact 
as long as a division of tasks is not separating actors fully. In a system of truly collective responsibility ownership of a 
conflict is not exclusive but shared reaching from global to local especially in cases of such severe human rights viola-
tions as R2P is confronting. Lastly collective action requires a minimum consensus and conceptual clarity of the norm 
R2P which is otherwise likely to produce and reinforce divisions between actors. But conceptual clarity must be based 
on diversity too to account for the desired inclusiveness. 
Principles for inclusive and collective action 
1.  Inter-institutional design should be based on collectively defined purpose;
2.  Unity of action and responsibility;
3.  No privileged ownership of crisis;
4.  No action without consultation;
5.  Synchronized and timely decision-making;
6.  Mainstreaming interoperability for IOs at all relevant levels;
7.  Collective action requires comprehensive capabilities.
Pdf create signature - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
create signature pdf; add signature image to pdf
Pdf create signature - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
pdf will signature; export pdf to word sign in
22
IMPLEMENTING THE RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT: NEW DIRECTIONS FOR PEACE AND SECURITY?
At least seven principles can be identified building a more inter-locking security system. The first principle is based on 
the need to identify a common social purpose around which actors policies can converge. This principle is important 
because it refers to the need of actors sharing common goals and through these goals become incentive compatible. The 
second principle calls for the unity of action and responsibility. Thus action needs to be recognized by all actors involved 
in order to achieve collective responsibility. Crucially accountability of actors rests on the inclusiveness of action. The 
third principle further develops this idea by arguing that conflicts cannot be assigned the ownership of an exclusive circle 
of actors but principally fall under collective ownership. The fourth principle aims at connecting IOs more systematically 
to each other. 
While in most cases there is no clear hierarchy between actors and thus legal obligations to follow interests from exter-
nal institutions do not exist a basic principle for crafting concerted action would at least agree on the need for mutual 
consultation before decision-making. Therefore, “no action without consultation” constitutes a fifth principle. Following 
mutual consultations is the need for synchronized decision-making. Synchronization at least refers to two properties: 
timeliness of collective response and thematic congruence of decisions. The sixth principle calls for a mainstreaming 
approach to inter-institutional relations. As the security notion under which R2P operates is fairly vast and cross-cutting 
a variety of policy fields inter-operability of IOs is in principle not confined to isolated areas but requires an organization-
-wide response. Therefore the call for mainstreaming interoperability. Lastly achieving effective complementarity requires 
comprehensive capabilities and a duplication of effort for two reasons: First it increases connectivity among actors. 
Second, the more resources are shared the higher the degree of collective accountability. 
In more concrete terms a number of actions can be envisioned. A joint contingency plan operationalizing a variety of 
possible scenarios for R2P relevant action should be developed which is identifying a toolbox for action. In order for this 
toolbox to be applicable an inter-institutional resource mapping exercise would be helpful to locate existing capabilities 
and gaps and linking resources to tasks. In such a system a modular approach or division of labor could be applied in 
which certain competences are connected to specific actors. This remains unproblematic as long as the unity of action 
and collective responsibility remain unaffected. 
References
African  Peace    And  Security  Architecture  (APSA)  (2010)  “Moving  Africa  Forward”  <www.securitycouncilreport.org/atf/
cf/%7B65BFCF9B-6D27-4E9C-8CD3-CF6E4FF96FF9%7D/RO%20African%20Peace%20and%20Security%20Architecture.pdf>.
Bellamy, A. (2012). “R2P - Dead or Alive?” in Brosig, M. (Ed.) “The Responsibility to Protect -From Evasive to Reluctant Action? The 
Role of Global Middle Powers”, Johannesburg: Hanns Seidel Foundation, Institute for Security Studies, Konrad Adenauer Foundation 
and South African Institute for International Affairs.
Brosig, M. (2010). “The Multi-Actor Game of Peacekeeping in Africa” International Peacekeeping 17 (3).
Dembinski, M. and Reinold, T. (2011). “Libya and the Future of the Responsibility to Protect - African and European Perspectives” 
Peace Research Institute Frankfurt, PRIF-Report No. 107.
Gowan, R. (2008). “The Strategic Context: Peacekeeping in Crisis 2006-08” International Peacekeeping 15 (4).
Hamann, E. (2012) “Brazil and R2P: A Rising Global Player Struggles to Harmonise Discourse and Practice” in Brosig, M. (Ed.) 
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Barcode Read. Barcode Create. OCR. Twain. Edit Digital Signatures. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Edit PDF Digital Signature. You maybe interested:
add signature to pdf reader; create pdf stamp signature
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET copyright to be respected, XDoc.PDF also allows PDF such security setting via digital signature.
pdf add signature field; adding a signature to a pdf file
AN INTERLOCKING SYSTEM OF GLOBAL AND REGIONAL SECURITY FOR R2P: ARE WE THERE YET?
23
“The Responsibility to Protect -From Evasive to Reluctant Action? The Role of Global Middle Powers”, Johannesburg: Hanns Seidel 
Foundation, Institute for Security Studies, Konrad Adenauer Foundation and South African Institute for International Affairs.
United Nations (2005) “In Larger Freedom: Towards Development, Security and Human Rights for All” <www.un.org/largerfreedom/
contents.htm>.
United  Nations  (2005)  “World  Summit  Outcome  document”  <www.responsibilitytoprotect.org/index.php?option=com_
content&view=article&id=398>.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
XDoc. HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET enables you to create signatures to PDF, including freehand signature, text and date signature. If
adding signature to pdf file; export pdf sign in
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Click to convert PDF document to Word (.docx). PDF and Word (.docx). Annotation Tab. 2. Create Freehand Signature. Click to create a freehand signature.
create transparent signature stamp for pdf; pdf signature
24
3. Responsibility to Protect  
and the Military
1
Dwight Raymond
1. Introduction 
Most references on the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) stress that coercive 
military intervention is but a narrow aspect of R2P, applicable only in limited 
and extreme circumstances.
2
For example, in 2001 The Responsibility to 
Protect Report of the International Commission on Intervention and State 
Sovereignty (ICISS) distilled R2P into the three elements of prevention, reac-
tion, and rebuilding. Subsequently, the 2005 United Nations General Assem-
bly World Summit Outcome Document articulated what later became known 
as the “three R2P pillars” consisting of a state’s responsibility to protect 
its population, the international community’s commitment to assist states, 
and the responsibility of member states to respond when a state is failing to 
provide protection.
3
1 Disclaimer: This paper reflects the author’s personal opinions and is not the official view of 
any U.S. governmental organization.
 R2P may be interpreted as the idea that sovereign states have a responsibility to protect 
their own citizens from avoidable catastrophe, and that when they are unwilling or unable 
to do so, that responsibility must be borne by the broader international community. Derived 
from International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty (Evans and Sahnoun, 
2001), R2P is normally restricted to the four major crimes of genocide, war crimes, crimes 
against humanity, and ethnic cleansing. A related, but different, term is the Protection of 
Civilians (PoC) which may be defined as “Efforts to protect civilians from physical violence, 
secure their rights to access essential services and resources, and create a secure, stable, 
and just environment for civilians over the long term.” (U.S. Army Peacekeeping and Stability 
Operations Institute, 2013).
3 Also see Evans, G. (2008). For the UN’s framing of R2P, see United Nations (2005); Ban Ki-
-moon, address on “Responsible Sovereignty: International Cooperation for a Changed World” 
(Berlin, 15 July 2008), available at: http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2008/sgsm11701.
doc.htm; and UN General Assembly, Implementing the Responsibility to Protect: Report of 
the Secretary-General, 12 January 2009, A/63/677, available at: <www.unhcr.org/refworld/
docid/4989924d2.html>.
•  Pillar One: The enduring responsibility of the State to protect its populations, whether 
nationals or not, from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against huma-
nity, and from their incitement.
•  Pillar Two: The commitment of the international community to assist States in meeting 
those obligations.
•  Pillar Three: The responsibility of Member States to respond collectively in a timely and 
decisive manner when a State is manifestly failing to provide such protection.
Col (Ret) Dwight Raymond is with 
the Peacekeeping and Stability 
Operations Institute at the U.S. 
Army War College. He is one of the 
primary authors of the Mass Atrocity 
Response Operations (MARO) 
Military Planning Handbook, the Mass 
Atrocity Prevention and Response 
Options (MAPRO) Policy Planning 
Handbook, and the Protection of 
Civilians Military Reference Guide.
.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality users to insert vector images to PDF file. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into
add signature pdf online; create pdf with signature field
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
PDF Digital Signature. Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields; Create signatures in new fields which hold the signature;
add signature image to pdf acrobat; create pdf signature stamp
RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT AND THE MILITARY
25
Despite the emphasis that R2P has much broader aspects, there is nevertheless a persistent and widespread perception 
that R2P is essentially synonymous with military action in response to mass atrocities. This has unfortunately contribu-
ted to resistance to R2P from some quarters, and may also create a tendency to overlook the importance of non-military 
efforts to mitigate mass atrocities. Military activities (or their threat) can indeed be useful to prevent or halt mass atroci-
ties and, with the caveat that R2P is more than military action, this paper will discuss military considerations within the 
context of R2P and related concepts such as the Responsibility While Protecting (RwP). It contends that RwP should 
best be viewed as a comprehensive approach to mitigate significant R2P risks.
2. The Military and Prevention
Mass Atrocity Response Operations (MARO) refer to “military activities conducted to prevent or halt mass atrocities”
4
and closely align with the use of the military in an R2P context. It is important to note that international military resources 
can be employed in a preventive mode short of a coercive military intervention. Some potential objectives for this use 
of the military may include:
•  Mitigate conditions that make mass atrocities more likely;
•  Expose/discredit perpetrators and enablers;
•  Establish credibility/capability of international community and potential intervention;
•  Protect potential victims;
•  Dissuade/stop/isolate/punish perpetrators and enablers;
•  Diminish perpetrator motivation or capability to conduct mass atrocities;
•  Build/demonstrate international resolve; and
•  Convince bystanders and negative actors not to support perpetrators and take constructive action to mitigate mass 
atrocities.
Prevention includes both long-term “structural” efforts as well as “direct” efforts when a crisis is imminent, and in-
ternational military forces can contribute to both (Bellamy, 2011). Military structural preventive measures may include 
security cooperation that can help reduce the likelihood of mass atrocities and identify potential flashpoints, while direct 
prevention may include using military forces in an emerging crisis to deter perpetrators and shield vulnerable popula-
tions. Indeed, military activities may be relevant during all three stages of the ICISS R2P framework and in support of the 
UN’s second and third pillars.
5
 For more information on MARO, see Sewall, S.; Raymond D. and Chin S. (2010).
 See Raymond, D., Cliff Bernath; Don Braum; and Zurcher K. (2012) for further elaboration on employment of military forces during all stages of 
a mass atrocity situation. Generally, MARO refers to military prevention and response operations while MAPRO refers to military and non-military 
efforts, including policies and programs, with MARO as a subset.
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
functionalities. convert Tiff file to PDF, add annotations to Tiff, Create signature on tiff, etc. Please refer to more details below:
create transparent signature stamp for pdf; add signature pdf preview
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Viewer provides other utility features for processing Tiff while in preview, such as convert Tiff file to PDF, add annotations to Tiff, Create signature on tiff
sign pdf online; create pdf signature
26
IMPLEMENTING THE RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT: NEW DIRECTIONS FOR PEACE AND SECURITY?
Table 1: MILITARY EFFORTS DURING R2P STAGES
PREVENT
REACT
REBUILD
Structural Prevention
Direct Prevention
Area Security
Establish/Maintain Security
Security Cooperation
Deployments
Shape-Clear-Hold-Build
Peacekeeping
Exercises
Shows of Force
Separation
Enable Humanitarism 
Assistance
Security Assistance
Preparations
Safe Areas
Support Governance, Rule 
of Law, Social Well-Being, 
Economic Development
Monitoring
Force Mobilization
Partner Enabling
Support SSR, DDR, TJ
Blockades, No-Fly Zones
Containment
Unexploded Munitions 
Clearance
Strikes, Raids
Defeat Perpetrators
Enable Humanitarism Assistance Non-Combatant Evacuation
Potential challenges include differentiating between “prevention” and “response,” as there could be overlap between the 
two (for example, a country may respond to a disturbing situation with military forces in order to prevent conditions from 
deteriorating). Additionally, preventive efforts are difficult to organize because of the multiplicity of relevant actors with 
their own dissimilar interests, objectives, constituencies, attention spans, and lines of authority. Long-term structural 
prevention strategies may easily be neglected because there will always be other issues that are more urgent. It may be 
difficult (and inappropriate) to separate mass atrocity prevention efforts from broader contexts and agendas. For exam-
ple, structural prevention efforts are likely to be conflated with general developmental programs, and there can never 
be too much development. Some correctly argue that “managing diversity” is an important approach to prevent mass 
atrocities (Baker, 2012).
6
Finally, mass atrocity situations are likely to be intermingled with other complexities such as 
conflict situations including insurgencies.
3. The Military and Response
As noted in the ICISS report, response measures are not limited to military ways and means, and military efforts may be 
significantly less than a coercive intervention, as some of the preventive activities discussed earlier may have continued 
utility. When robust military force is committed to a mass atrocity situation, there are seven conceptual approaches for 
their employment (the approaches are not mutually exclusive and can be combined in a variety of ways).  All of the 
approaches have advantages and disadvantages, and have variable appropriateness in different circumstances (Sewall 
S., Raymond D. and Chin S., 2010).
 This theme has also been repeatedly emphasized by Dr. Francis Deng, the former UN Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re To be specific, you can edit PDF password and digital signature, and set
adding signature to pdf files; create signature from pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re To be specific, you can edit PDF password and digital signature, and set
adding signature to pdf form; pdf signature stamp
RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT AND THE MILITARY
27
• Area Security - secure a large area with sufficient force deployed in unit sectors.
• Shape-Clear-Hold-Build - systematically secure limited areas and expand when able.
• Separation - interpose forces between perpetrators and victims through the establishment of a de-militarized zone 
or similar buffer zone.
• Safe Areas - secure concentrations of vulnerable populations such as displaced persons camps or enclaves.
• Partner Enabling - provide advisors, equipment, or specialized support to other actors such as security forces, 
coalitions, or victim groups.
• Containment - influence perpetrator behavior as necessary with measures such as overwhelming presence, strikes, 
blockades, or no-fly zones (perpetrators might not be targeted as long as they behave themselves).
• Defeat Perpetrators - attack and defeat key perpetrator assets such as leadership, forces, and logistics to neutralize 
or remove the capability to conduct mass atrocities.
Military operations are problematic when there is an imperfect mandate or other strategic guidance, and inevitably such 
direction will to some degree be incomplete, vague, or late. Proactive military leaders will (for better or worse) take action 
based upon circumstances in the operational environment; cautious leaders given inadequate guidance will refrain from 
acting. Or, to put it another way, “Some commanders will find a way to do what is necessary; others can always find an 
excuse to do nothing.”
In addition to concerns caused by inadvertent civilian casualties and other collateral damage, military actions have other 
political impacts. In order to retain flexibility that is inevitably critical for successful military operations, commanders will 
prefer to expand their freedom to operate, seize and maintain the initiative, and generate options. This implies a tendency 
to remove or roll back targetable adversary capabilities during fleeting windows of opportunity, and potentially creates 
political complications. Because of the potential infeasibility of attacking only perpetrators that are directly committing 
atrocities (especially if operations are exclusively conducted by air forces), it is often desirable from a military standpoint 
to attack other targets further up the “threat chain” (staged forces, logistics, command and control facilities, military 
leadership, political leadership). At some point, such targeting will have a political dimension.
Image 1: Threat Chain
It is also important to plan for, prepare for and effectively conduct the transition to a post-conflict aftermath. Military ac-
tors tend to give this consideration short shrift because the “kinetic” phase is more immediate and in any event primary 
responsibility for the “rebuild” phase rests upon political decision-making and the pursuit of non-military outcomes, with 
Direct 
Threat
Imminent 
Threat
Future 
Threat
Threat 
Logistics
Threat 
Command & 
Control
Threat 
Enablers
Threat 
Leadership
28
IMPLEMENTING THE RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT: NEW DIRECTIONS FOR PEACE AND SECURITY?
the military largely in a supporting role. Note that suitable post-conflict “lines of effort” are probably identical to those 
during pre-conflict prevention, and should not be overlooked during an intervention. Upon entering a post-intervention re-
building period, the international community is invariably in a “prevent” mode regarding future potential mass atrocities.
Image 2: Lines of Effort
7
PREVENT
REACT
REBUILD
4. R2P Risks
Preventive and reactive international R2P efforts have numerous risks. The main potential problems generally include 
the following:
• Ineffectiveness  - Efforts may be inadequate due to insufficient resources, ineffective implementation, or because 
they are too late.
• Unintended Escalation - R2P efforts can result in expanded or protracted conflict and the pursuit of other objectives.
• Collateral Damage - Military actions can result in inadvertent civilian harm. Economic sanctions may also have a 
greater impact on populations than on the intended targets.
• Anti-Intervention Sentiment - Actors and populations in the country of interest, the international community, and do-
mestic polities may oppose R2P efforts because of their extent or nature or a perceived lack of compelling interests 
to justify action or sustain the necessary political will.
• Quagmire - Because of the likely intractable problems, extended efforts may be required to prevent, react to, and 
rebuild societies. An intervention that was originally envisioned as short, simple, and straightforward may encounter 
“mission creep.” Failure to address the entire scope of the problem adequately (including a realistic assessment of 
post-intervention requirements) will contribute to a protracted and potentially futile quagmire.
 “Lines of effort” refer to major elements that are necessary and generally sufficient for success. The lines shown here are similar to those pre-
sented in numerous documents related to stabilization and reconstruction. See especially United States Institute of Peace and United States Army 
Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute (2009).
Safe and Secure Environment
Good Governance
Rule of Law
Social Well-Being
Sustainable Economy
RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT AND THE MILITARY
29
• Stalemate - If crises are not decisively resolved or root causes are not redressed, a situation in which the threat of 
future mass atrocities could exist. This could also result in de facto partition of the host state which may or may not 
be permanent.
• Losses - Military forces employed in support of R2P will likely suffer casualties, and may be defeated when small 
forces are quickly committed or are in isolated locations.
• Increased Resistance because of Pride or Nationalism  - Actors and populations in the country of interest may incre-
asingly oppose “foreign occupation,” even if they do not support the perpetrators of mass atrocities.
• International Community Fissures  - International actors may disagree over objectives, mandates, means, implemen-
tation, and burden sharing.
• Politicization of R2P Efforts - Civilian protection concerns will likely be interwoven with other political issues. R2P 
efforts (including humanitarian assistance) will likely have controversial political implications.
• R2P Hijacking - Malevolent actors (including perpetrators) may attempt to cloak their goals with R2P principles (e.g., 
use Protection of Civilians as an excuse to crush a rebellion or suppress demonstrations).
• Negative Second-Order Effects - R2P efforts can create subsequent problems, including:
. Negative impact on region;
. Reluctance to take future action;
. Deterioration of relations between global and regional actors; and
. Government collapse (whether intended or not).
• Risks of Inaction - Inaction can be due to lack of political will or flawed decision-making processes. Consideration of 
the above risks may inspire caution, inertia, and inaction. Collective action might not happen if it is conditional upon 
a UN Security Council Resolution which is blocked by a permanent member.
8
In addition to considering the risks that 
may arise from taking action, it is always important to weigh the risks of inaction or token efforts when civilians are 
at risk from mass atrocities.
5. Responsibility While Protecting (RwP)
After the 2011 Libya intervention, the “Responsibility While Protecting (RwP)” concept emerged due to concerns about 
potential deviation from UN Security Council mandates, civilian casualties resulting from military operations, and NATO’s 
reporting to and communication with the UN during the operation (Hamann, 2012). While it has been welcomed by 
many, RwP has been skeptically interpreted as, at best, essentially equivalent to adherence to the Law of Armed Conflict/
International Humanitarian Law (LOAC/IHL) or, at worst, international backsliding to create further institutional impedi-
ments to R2P.
As discussed earlier, R2P entails a wide range of risks. RwP could be constructively applied as a comprehensive ap-
proach to implement R2P effectively and mitigate these risks. RwP measures could include but would not be limited to:
 The requirement for UN Security Council authorization is a highly contested topic. See discussion in Evans, G. and Sahnoun M. (2001), pages 
47-55.
30
IMPLEMENTING THE RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT: NEW DIRECTIONS FOR PEACE AND SECURITY?
•  Adherence to LOAC/IHL;
•  Planning and preparation for likely contingencies, branches, and sequels;
•  Routine coordination between OSAPG and national focal points for mass atrocity prevention;
•  Effective coordination between a “deputized” political authority (e.g., a regional organization, coalition, or national 
government(s) and UN Secretariat;
•  Exchanges of liaisons between the UN and the military force as well as its own political authority (when a military 
force is not subordinate to the UN);
•  Efficient reporting (what has happened, what is happening, future intentions);
•  Timely supplemental UNSC Resolutions as the situation evolves;
•  Preparation for post-intervention transition, which may include a provision for temporary Executive Authority if such 
a requirement is likely;
•  Quick termination of military operations and withdrawal of forces, if directed; and
•  Continual nurturing of all lines of effort addressed earlier (safe secure environment, good governance, sustainable 
economy, rule of law, social well-being) which are commonly applicable during all R2P stages (prevent, react, 
rebuild).
6. Conclusion
It is commonly accepted that mass atrocity prevention is preferable to response; less commonly understood is that R2P 
includes prevention and that military efforts can play a role in both. It is important to learn from previous experiences 
(including Libya and other cases), as the possibility of future military intervention unfortunately still exists. Moreover, a 
credible international intervention capability (particularly if demonstrated in the past) can deter future perpetrators, and 
reduce the need for actual future military intervention. RwP can be a helpful concept to shape R2P efforts effectively 
(including military measures) and mitigate the risks of action and inaction. The key challenge is that efforts to reduce 
some types of risk will inevitably generate others, and an effective RwP approach will have to balance these multi-faceted 
risks appropriately.
References
Baker, P. (2012) “Managing Diversity for Atrocity Prevention in Socially Divided Societies.” Muscatine, Iowa: The Stanley Foundation. 
<www.stanleyfoundation.org/publications/pab/BakerPAB912.pdf>.
Bellamy, A. (2011) “Mass Atrocities and Armed Conflict: Links, Distinctions, and Implications for the Responsibility to Prevent.” 
Muscatine, Iowa: The Stanley Foundation. <www.stanleyfoundation.org/publications/pab/BellamyPAB22011.pdf>.
Evans, G. (2008) “The Responsibility to Protect: Ending Mass Atrocity Crimes Once and For All” Washington, DC: Brookings Insti-
tution Press.
Evans, G. and Sahnoun, M. (Co-Chairs), (2001) “Report of the Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty (ICISS) - The res-
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested