c# convert pdf to tiff : Add signature to pdf online software application project winforms html web page UWP Paradis-rdebuts_en3-part347

> x[3]
[1] 3
> x[3] <- 20
> x
[1] 1 2 20 4 5
The index itself can be a vector of mode numeric:
> i <- c(1, 3)
> x[i]
[1] 1 20
If x is a matrix or a data frame, the value of the ith line and jth column
is accessed with x[i, j]. To access all values of a given row or column, one
has simply to omit the appropriate index (without forgetting the comma!):
> x <- matrix(1:6, 2, 3)
> x
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]
1
3
5
[2,]
2
4
6
> x[, 3] <- 21:22
> x
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]
1
3
21
[2,]
2
4
22
> x[, 3]
[1] 21 22
You have certainly noticed that the last result is a vector and not a matrix.
The default behaviour of R is to return an object of the lowest dimension
possible. This can be altered with the option drop which default is TRUE:
> x[, 3, drop = FALSE]
[,1]
[1,]
21
[2,]
22
This indexing system is easily generalized to arrays, with as many indices
as the number of dimensions of the array (for example, a three dimensional
array: x[i, j, k], x[, , 3], x[, , 3, drop = FALSE], and so on). It may
be useful to keep in mind that indexing is made with square brackets, while
parentheses are used for the arguments of a function:
> x(1)
Error: couldn’t find function "x"
27
Add signature to pdf online - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
pdf sign in; adding signature to pdf
Add signature to pdf online - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
pdf signatures; add a signature to a pdf file
Indexing can also be used to suppress one or several rows or columns
using negative values. For example, x[-1, ] will suppress the rst row, while
x[-c(1, 15), ] will do the same for the 1st and 15th rows. Using the matrix
dened above:
> x[, -1]
[,1] [,2]
[1,]
3
21
[2,]
4
22
> x[, -(1:2)]
[1] 21 22
> x[, -(1:2), drop = FALSE]
[,1]
[1,]
21
[2,]
22
For vectors, matrices and arrays, it is possible to access the values of an
element with a comparison expression as the index:
> x <- 1:10
> x[x >= 5] <- 20
> x
[1] 1 2 3 4 20 20 20 20 20 20
> x[x == 1] <- 25
> x
[1] 25 2 3 4 20 20 20 20 20 20
Apractical use of the logical indexing is, for instance, the possibility to
select the even elements of an integer variable:
> x <- rpois(40, lambda=5)
> x
[1] 5 9 4 7 7 6 4 5 11 3 5 7 1 5 3 9 2 2 5 2
[21] 4 6 6 5 4 5 3 4 3 3 3 7 7 3 8 1 4 2 1 4
> x[x %% 2 == 0]
[1] 4 6 4 2 2 2 4 6 6 4 4 8 4 2 4
Thus, this indexing system uses the logical values returned, in the above
examples, by comparison operators. These logical values can be computed
beforehand, they then will be recycled if necessary:
> x <- 1:40
> s <- c(FALSE, TRUE)
> x[s]
[1] 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40
28
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
By using it in your C# application, you can easily do following things. Add a signature or an empty signature field in any PDF file page.
add signature to pdf online; pdf to word converter sign in
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
By using it in your VB.NET application, you can easily do following things. Add a signature or an empty signature field in any PDF file page.
adding a signature to a pdf; add signature to pdf
Logical indexing can also be used with data frames, but with caution since
dierent columns of the data drame may be of dierent modes.
For lists, accessing the dierent elements (which can be any kind of object)
is done either with single or with double square brackets: the dierence is
that with single brackets a list is returned, whereas double brackets extract the
object fromthe list. The result canthenbe itself indexed as previously seen for
vectors, matrices, etc. For instance, if the third object of a list is a vector, its
ith value can be accessed using my.list[[3]][i], if it is a three dimensional
array using my.list[[3]][i, j, k], and so on. Another dierence is that
my.list[1:2] will return a list with the rst and second elements of the
original list, whereas my.list[[1:2]] will no not give the expected result.
3.5.5
Accessing the values of an object with names
The names are labels of the elements of an object, and thus of mode charac-
ter. They are generally optional attributes. There are several kinds of names
(names, colnames, rownames, dimnames).
The names of a vector are stored in a vector of the same length of the
object, and can be accessed with the function names.
> x <- 1:3
> names(x)
NULL
> names(x) <- c("a", "b", "c")
> x
a b c
1 2 3
> names(x)
[1] "a" "b" "c"
> names(x) <- NULL
> x
[1] 1 2 3
For matrices and data frames, colnames and rownames are labels of the
columns and rows, respectively. They can be accessed either with their re-
spective functions, or with dimnames which returns a list with both vectors.
> X <- matrix(1:4, 2)
> rownames(X) <- c("a", "b")
> colnames(X) <- c("c", "d")
> X
c d
a 1 3
b 2 4
> dimnames(X)
[[1]]
[1] "a" "b"
29
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Dicom
can convert Dicom image to PDF (.pdf) online and convert C# .NET provide several utility signature buttons, which can help users to add text signatures
add signature image to pdf acrobat; adding a signature to a pdf document
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Raster
to Tiff (.tif, .tiff) online, create PDF document from HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET offers signature features, which allows users to add text signatures to
create signature field in pdf; add jpeg signature to pdf
[[2]]
[1] "c" "d"
For arrays, the names of the dimensions can be accessed with dimnames:
> A <- array(1:8, dim = c(2, 2, 2))
> A
, , 1
[,1] [,2]
[1,]
1
3
[2,]
2
4
, , 2
[,1] [,2]
[1,]
5
7
[2,]
6
8
> dimnames(A) <- list(c("a", "b"), c("c", "d"), c("e", "f"))
> A
, , e
c d
a 1 3
b 2 4
, , f
c d
a 5 7
b 6 8
If the elements of an object have names, they can be extracted by using
them as indices. Actually, this should be termed ‘subsetting’ rather than
‘extraction’ since the attributes of the original object are kept. For instance,
if a data frame DF contains the variables x, y, and z, the command DF["x"]
will return a data frame with just x; DF[c("x", "y")] will return a data
frame with both variables. This works with lists as well if the elements in the
list have names.
As the reader surely realizes, the index used here is a vector of mode
character. Like the numeric or logical vectors seen above, this vector can be
dened beforehand and then used for the extraction.
To extract a vector or a factor from a data frame, on can use the operator
$(e.g., DF$x). This also works with lists.
30
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page
create a pdf signature file; adding a signature to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
NET program. Password, digital signature and PDF text, image and page redaction will be used and customized. PDF Annotation Edit.
export pdf to word sign in; create pdf with signature field
3.5.6
The data editor
It is possible to use a graphical spreadsheet-like editor to edit a \data" object.
For example, if X is a matrix, the commanddata.entry(X) will open agraphic
editor and one will be able tomodifysomevalues by clickingonthe appropriate
cells, or to add new columns or rows.
The function data.entry modies directly the object given as argument
without needing to assign its result. On the other hand, the function de
returns a list with the objects given as arguments and possibly modied. This
result is displayed on the screen by default, but, as for most functions, can be
assigned to an object.
The details of using the data editor depend on the operating system.
3.5.7
Arithmetics and simple functions
There are numerous functions in R to manipulate data. We have already seen
the simplest one, c which concatenates the objects listed in parentheses. For
example:
> c(1:5, seq(10, 11, 0.2))
[1] 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 10.0 10.2 10.4 10.6 10.8 11.0
Vectors can be manipulated with classical arithmetic expressions:
> x <- 1:4
> y <- rep(1, 4)
> z <- x + y
> z
[1] 2 3 4 5
Vectors of dierent lengths can be added; in this case, the shortest vector
is recycled. Examples:
> x <- 1:4
> y <- 1:2
> z <- x + y
> z
[1] 2 4 4 6
> x <- 1:3
> y <- 1:2
> z <- x + y
Warning message:
longer object length
is not a multiple of shorter object length in: x + y
> z
[1] 2 4 4
31
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET. View,Convert,Edit,Process,Protect,SignPDF Files. Download Free Trial View Online Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit.
add signature pdf preview; pdf will signature
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into Add images to any selected PDF page in VB to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed.
adding signature to pdf form; create pdf signature field
Note that R returned a warning message and not an error message, thus
the operation has been performed. If we want to add (or multiply) the same
value to all the elements of a vector:
> x <- 1:4
> a <- 10
> z <- a * x
> z
[1] 10 20 30 40
The functions available in R for manipulating data are too many to be
listed here. One can nd all the basic mathematical functions (log, exp,
log10, log2, sin, cos, tan, asin, acos, atan, abs, sqrt, ...), special func-
tions (gamma, digamma, beta, besselI, ...), as well as diverse functions useful
in statistics. Some of these functions are listed in the following table.
sum(x)
sum of the elements of x
prod(x)
product of the elements of x
max(x)
maximum of the elements of x
min(x)
minimum of the elements of x
which.max(x)
returns the index of the greatest element of x
which.min(x)
returns the index of the smallest element of x
range(x)
id. than c(min(x), max(x))
length(x)
number of elements in x
mean(x)
mean of the elements of x
median(x)
median of the elements of x
var(x) or cov(x)
variance of the elements of x (calculated on n   1); if x is
amatrix or a data frame, the variance-covariance matrix is
calculated
cor(x)
correlation matrix of x if it is a matrix or a data frame (1 if x
is a vector)
var(x, y) or cov(x, y)
covariance between x and y, or between the columns of x and
those of y if they are matrices or data frames
cor(x, y)
linear correlation between xand y, or correlation matrix if they
are matrices or data frames
These functions return a single value (thus a vector of length one), except
range which returns a vector of length two, and var, cov, and cor which may
return a matrix. The following functions return more complex results.
round(x, n)
rounds the elements of x to n decimals
rev(x)
reverses the elements of x
sort(x)
sorts the elements of xin increasing order; to sort in decreasingorder:
rev(sort(x))
rank(x)
ranks of the elements of x
32
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images convert Tiff file to PDF, add annotations to Tiff, Create signature on tiff
add signature image to pdf; sign pdf online
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images preview, such as convert Tiff file to PDF, add annotations to Tiff, Create signature on tiff
pdf signature field; sign pdf
log(x, base)
computes the logarithm of x with base base
scale(x)
if x is a matrix, centers and reduces the data; to center only use
the option center=FALSE, to reduce only scale=FALSE (by default
center=TRUE, scale=TRUE)
pmin(x,y,...)
avector which ith element is the minimum of x[i], y[i], ...
pmax(x,y,...)
id. for the maximum
cumsum(x)
avector which ith element is the sum from x[1] to x[i]
cumprod(x)
id. for the product
cummin(x)
id. for the minimum
cummax(x)
id. for the maximum
match(x, y)
returns a vector of the same length than x with the elements of x
which are in y (NA otherwise)
which(x == a)
returns a vector of the indices of x if the comparison operation is
true (TRUE), in this example the values of i for which x[i] == a (the
argument of this function must be a variable of mode logical)
choose(n, k)
computes thecombinations of kevents amongnrepetitions =n!=[(n 
k)!k!]
na.omit(x)
suppresses the observations with missing data (NA) (suppresses the
corresponding line if x is a matrix or a data frame)
na.fail(x)
returns an error message if x contains at least one NA
unique(x)
if x is a vector or a data frame, returns a similar object but with the
duplicate elements suppressed
table(x)
returns atable with the numbers of thedierentsvalues of x(typically
for integers or factors)
table(x, y)
contingency table of x and y
subset(x, ...)
returns a selection of x with respect to criteria (..., typically com-
parisons: x$V1 < 10); if x is a data frame, the option select gives
the variables to be kept (or dropped using a minus sign)
sample(x, size)
resample randomly and without replacement size elements in the
vector x, the option replace = TRUE allows to resample with replace-
ment
3.5.8
Matrix computation
R has facilities for matrix computation and manipulation. The functions
rbind and cbind bind matrices with respect to the lines or the columns,
respectively:
> m1 <- matrix(1, nr = 2, nc = 2)
> m2 <- matrix(2, nr = 2, nc = 2)
> rbind(m1, m2)
[,1] [,2]
[1,]
1
1
[2,]
1
1
[3,]
2
2
[4,]
2
2
> cbind(m1, m2)
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
33
[1,]
1
1
2
2
[2,]
1
1
2
2
The operator for the product of two matrices is ‘%*%’. For example, con-
sidering the two matrices m1 and m2 above:
> rbind(m1, m2) %*% cbind(m1, m2)
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]
2
2
4
4
[2,]
2
2
4
4
[3,]
4
4
8
8
[4,]
4
4
8
8
> cbind(m1, m2) %*% rbind(m1, m2)
[,1] [,2]
[1,]
10
10
[2,]
10
10
The transposition of a matrix is done with the function t; this function
works also with a data frame.
The function diag can be used to extract or modify the diagonal of a
matrix, or to build a diagonal matrix.
> diag(m1)
[1] 1 1
> diag(rbind(m1, m2) %*% cbind(m1, m2))
[1] 2 2 8 8
> diag(m1) <- 10
> m1
[,1] [,2]
[1,]
10
1
[2,]
1
10
> diag(3)
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]
1
0
0
[2,]
0
1
0
[3,]
0
0
1
> v <- c(10, 20, 30)
> diag(v)
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]
10
0
0
[2,]
0
20
0
[3,]
0
0
30
> diag(2.1, nr = 3, nc = 5)
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,] 2.1 0.0 0.0
0
0
[2,] 0.0 2.1 0.0
0
0
[3,] 0.0 0.0 2.1
0
0
34
R has also some special functions for matrix computation. We can cite
here solve for inverting a matrix, qr for decomposition, eigen for computing
eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and svd for singular value decomposition.
35
4 Graphics with R
R oers a remarkable variety of graphics. To get an idea, one can type
demo(graphics) or demo(persp). It is not possible to detail here the pos-
sibilities of R in terms of graphics, particularly since each graphical function
has a large number of options making the production of graphics very  exible.
The way graphical functions work deviates substantially from the scheme
sketched at the beginning of this document. Particularly, the result of a graph-
ical function cannot be assigned to an object
11
but is sent to a graphical device.
Agraphical device is a graphical window or a le.
There are two kinds of graphical functions: the high-level plotting func-
tions which create a new graph, and the low-level plotting functions which
add elements to an existing graph. The graphs are produced with respect to
graphical parameters which are dened by default and can be modied with
the function par.
We will see in a rst time how to manage graphics and graphical devices;
we will then somehow detail the graphical functions and parameters. We will
see a practical example of the use of these functionalities in producing graphs.
Finally, we will see the packages grid and lattice whose functioning is dierent
from the one summarized above.
4.1 Managing graphics
4.1.1
Opening several graphical devices
When agraphical function is executed, if nographical device is open,R opens a
graphicalwindow anddisplays the graph. A graphical device may beopen with
an appropriate function. The list of available graphical devices depends on the
operating system. The graphical windows are called X11 under Unix/Linux
and windows under Windows. In all cases, one can open a graphical window
with the command x11() which also works under Windows because of an alias
towards the command windows(). A graphical device which is a le will be
open with a function depending on the format: postscript(), pdf(), png(),
... The list of available graphical devices can be found with ?device.
The last open device becomes the active graphical device on which all
subsequent graphs are displayed. The function dev.list() displays the list
of open devices:
> x11(); x11(); pdf()
> dev.list()
11
There are a few remarkable exceptions: hist() and barplot() produce also numeric
results as lists or matrices.
36
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested