c# convert pdf to tiff : Create pdf signature box control application system web page html windows console pcb33-part421

Solution
To control the order of items in a dictionary, you can use an OrderedDict from the
collections module. It exactly preserves the original insertion order of data when
iterating. For example:
from collections import OrderedDict
d = OrderedDict()
d['foo'= 1
d['bar'= 2
d['spam'= 3
d['grok'= 4
# Outputs "foo 1", "bar 2", "spam 3", "grok 4"
for key in d:
print(keyd[key])
An OrderedDict can be particularly useful when you want to build a mapping that you
may want to later serialize or encode into a different format. For example, if you want
to precisely control the order of fields appearing in a JSON encoding, first building the
data in an OrderedDict will do the trick:
>>> import json
>>> json.dumps(d)
'{"foo": 1, "bar": 2, "spam": 3, "grok": 4}'
>>>
Discussion
An OrderedDict internally maintains a doubly linked list that orders the keys according
to insertion order. When a new item is first inserted, it is placed at the end of this list.
Subsequent reassignment of an existing key doesn’t change the order.
Be aware that the size of an OrderedDict is more than twice as large as a normal dic‐
tionary due to the extra linked list that’s created. Thus, if you are going to build a data
structure involving a large number of OrderedDict instances (e.g., reading 100,000 lines
of a CSV file into a list of OrderedDict instances), you would need to study the re‐
quirements of your application to determine if the benefits of using an OrderedDict
outweighed the extra memory overhead.
1.8. Calculating with Dictionaries
Problem
You want to perform various calculations (e.g., minimum value, maximum value, sort‐
ing, etc.) on a dictionary of data.
1.8. Calculating with Dictionaries  |  13
Create pdf signature box - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
pdf add signature field; add jpg signature to pdf
Create pdf signature box - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
create pdf stamp signature; pdf to word converter sign in
Solution
Consider a dictionary that maps stock names to prices:
prices = {
'ACME'45.23,
'AAPL'612.78,
'IBM'205.55,
'HPQ'37.20,
'FB'10.75
}
In order to perform useful calculations on the dictionary contents, it is often useful to
invert the keys and values of the dictionary using zip(). For example, here is how to
find the minimum and maximum price and stock name:
min_price = min(zip(prices.values(), prices.keys()))
# min_price is (10.75, 'FB')
max_price = max(zip(prices.values(), prices.keys()))
# max_price is (612.78, 'AAPL')
Similarly, to rank the data, use zip() with sorted(), as in the following:
prices_sorted = sorted(zip(prices.values(), prices.keys()))
# prices_sorted is [(10.75, 'FB'), (37.2, 'HPQ'),
#                   (45.23, 'ACME'), (205.55, 'IBM'),
#                   (612.78, 'AAPL')]
When doing these calculations, be aware that zip() creates an iterator that can only be
consumed once. For example, the following code is an error:
prices_and_names = zip(prices.values(), prices.keys())
print(min(prices_and_names))   # OK
print(max(prices_and_names))   # ValueError: max() arg is an empty sequence
Discussion
If you try to perform common data reductions on a dictionary, you’ll find that they only
process the keys, not the values. For example:
min(prices  # Returns 'AAPL'
max(prices  # Returns 'IBM'
This is probably not what you want because you’re actually trying to perform a calcu‐
lation involving the dictionary values. You might try to fix this using the values()
method of a dictionary:
min(prices.values())  # Returns 10.75
max(prices.values())  # Returns 612.78
14  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Barcode Read. Barcode Create. OCR. Twain. Edit Digital Signatures. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Edit PDF Digital Signature.
add signature to pdf reader; pdf signature field
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
Barcode Read. Barcode Create. OCR. Twain. Edit Digital Signatures. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Edit PDF Digital Signature.
add signature to pdf document; create pdf signature field
Unfortunately, this is often not exactly what you want either. For example, you may want
to know information about the corresponding keys (e.g., which stock has the lowest
price?).
You can get the key corresponding to the min or max value if you supply a key function
to min() and max(). For example:
min(priceskey=lambda kprices[k])  # Returns 'FB'
max(priceskey=lambda kprices[k])  # Returns 'AAPL'
However, to get the minimum value, you’ll need to perform an extra lookup step. For
example:
min_value = prices[min(priceskey=lambda kprices[k])]
The solution involving zip() solves the problem by “inverting” the dictionary into a
sequence of (value, key) pairs. When performing comparisons on such tuples, the
value element is compared first, followed by the key. This gives you exactly the behavior
that you want and allows reductions and sorting to be easily performed on the dictionary
contents using a single statement.
It should be noted that in calculations involving (value, key) pairs, the key will be
used to determine the result in instances where multiple entries happen to have the same
value. For instance, in calculations such as min() and max(), the entry with the smallest
or largest key will be returned if there happen to be duplicate values. For example:
>>> prices = { 'AAA' : 45.23'ZZZ'45.23 }
>>> min(zip(prices.values(), prices.keys()))
(45.23, 'AAA')
>>> max(zip(prices.values(), prices.keys()))
(45.23, 'ZZZ')
>>>
1.9. Finding Commonalities in Two Dictionaries
Problem
You have two dictionaries and want to find out what they might have in common (same
keys, same values, etc.).
Solution
Consider two dictionaries:
a = {
'x' : 1,
'y' : 2,
'z' : 3
}
1.9. Finding Commonalities in Two Dictionaries  |  15
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality users to insert vector images to PDF file. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into
create transparent signature stamp for pdf; pdf export sign in
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images.
add signature image to pdf; adding signature to pdf
b = {
'w' : 10,
'x' : 11,
'y' : 2
}
To find out what the two dictionaries have in common, simply perform common set
operations using the keys() or items() methods. For example:
# Find keys in common
a.keys() & b.keys()   # { 'x', 'y' }
# Find keys in a that are not in b
a.keys() - b.keys()   # { 'z' }
# Find (key,value) pairs in common
a.items() & b.items() # { ('y', 2) }
These kinds of operations can also be used to alter or filter dictionary contents. For
example, suppose you want to make a new dictionary with selected keys removed. Here
is some sample code using a dictionary comprehension:
# Make a new dictionary with certain keys removed
c = {key:a[keyfor key in a.keys() - {'z''w'}}
# c is {'x': 1, 'y': 2}
Discussion
A dictionary is a mapping between a set of keys and values. The keys() method of a
dictionary returns a keys-view object that exposes the keys. A little-known feature of
keys views is that they also support common set operations such as unions, intersections,
and differences. Thus, if you need to perform common set operations with dictionary
keys, you can often just use the keys-view objects directly without first converting them
into a set.
The items() method of a dictionary returns an items-view object consisting of (key,
value) pairs. This object supports similar set operations and can be used to perform
operations such as finding out which key-value pairs two dictionaries have in common.
Although similar, the values() method of a dictionary does not support the set oper‐
ations described in this recipe. In part, this is due to the fact that unlike keys, the items
contained in a values view aren’t guaranteed to be unique. This alone makes certain set
operations of questionable utility. However, if you must perform such calculations, they
can be accomplished by simply converting the values to a set first.
16  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re To be specific, you can edit PDF password and digital signature, and set
adding a signature to a pdf form; add a signature to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re To be specific, you can edit PDF password and digital signature, and set
pdf export sign in; add signature to pdf acrobat
1.10. Removing Duplicates from a Sequence while
Maintaining Order
Problem
You want to eliminate the duplicate values in a sequence, but preserve the order of the
remaining items.
Solution
If the values in the sequence are hashable, the problem can be easily solved using a set
and a generator. For example:
def dedupe(items):
seen = set()
for item in items:
if item not in seen:
yield item
seen.add(item)
Here is an example of how to use your function:
>>> a = [152191510]
>>> list(dedupe(a))
[1, 5, 2, 9, 10]
>>>
This only works if the items in the sequence are hashable. If you are trying to eliminate
duplicates in a sequence of unhashable types (such as dicts), you can make a slight
change to this recipe, as follows:
def dedupe(itemskey=None):
seen = set()
for item in items:
val = item if key is None else key(item)
if val not in seen:
yield item
seen.add(val)
Here, the purpose of the key argument is to specify a function that converts sequence
items into a hashable type for the purposes of duplicate detection. Here’s how it works:
>>> a = [ {'x':1'y':2}, {'x':1'y':3}, {'x':1'y':2}, {'x':2'y':4}]
>>> list(dedupe(akey=lambda d: (d['x'],d['y'])))
[{'x': 1, 'y': 2}, {'x': 1, 'y': 3}, {'x': 2, 'y': 4}]
>>> list(dedupe(akey=lambda dd['x']))
[{'x': 1, 'y': 2}, {'x': 2, 'y': 4}]
>>>
This latter solution also works nicely if you want to eliminate duplicates based on the
value of a single field or attribute or a larger data structure.
1.10. Removing Duplicates from a Sequence while Maintaining Order  |  17
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on PDF using C# code. Create PDF Document from Existing Files Using
copy and paste signature into pdf; create a pdf signature file
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Password, digital signature and PDF text, image and page added to a specific location on PDF file page. In addition, you can easily create, modify, and delete
pdf secure signature; adding signature to pdf form
Discussion
If all you want to do is eliminate duplicates, it is often easy enough to make a set. For
example:
>>> a
[1, 5, 2, 1, 9, 1, 5, 10]
>>> set(a)
{1, 2, 10, 5, 9}
>>>
However, this approach doesn’t preserve any kind of ordering. So, the resulting data will
be scrambled afterward. The solution shown avoids this.
The use of a generator function in this recipe reflects the fact that you might want the
function to be extremely general purpose—not necessarily tied directly to list process‐
ing. For example, if you want to read a file, eliminating duplicate lines, you could simply
do this:
with open(somefile,'r'as f:
for line in dedupe(f):
...
The specification of a key function mimics similar functionality in built-in functions
such as sorted(), min(), and max(). For instance, see Recipes 1.8 and 1.13.
1.11. Naming a Slice
Problem
Your program has become an unreadable mess of hardcoded slice indices and you want
to clean it up.
Solution
Suppose you have some code that is pulling specific data fields out of a record string
with fixed fields (e.g., from a flat file or similar format):
######    0123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890'
record = '....................100          .......513.25     ..........'
cost = int(record[20:32]) * float(record[40:48])
Instead of doing that, why not name the slices like this?
SHARES = slice(20,32)
PRICE  = slice(40,48)
cost = int(record[SHARES]) * float(record[PRICE])
18  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
programmatically. Document Protect. Apply password to protect PDF. Allow to create digital signature. Easy to set PDF file permission. Easy
add signature image to pdf; adding a signature to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in users to insert images to PDF file in Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo
adding signature to pdf doc; add signature to pdf document
In the latter version, you avoid having a lot of mysterious hardcoded indices, and what
you’re doing becomes much clearer.
Discussion
As a general rule, writing code with a lot of hardcoded index values leads to a readability
and maintenance mess. For example, if you come back to the code a year later, you’ll
look at it and wonder what you were thinking when you wrote it. The solution shown
is simply a way of more clearly stating what your code is actually doing.
In general, the built-in slice() creates a slice object that can be used anywhere a slice
is allowed. For example:
>>> items = [0123456]
>>> a = slice(24)
>>> items[2:4]
[2, 3]
>>> items[a]
[2, 3]
>>> items[a= [10,11]
>>> items
[0, 1, 10, 11, 4, 5, 6]
>>> del items[a]
>>> items
[0, 1, 4, 5, 6]
If you have a slice instance s, you can get more information about it by looking at its
s.starts.stop, and s.step attributes, respectively. For example:
>>> a = slice(10502)
>>> a.start
10
>>> a.stop
50
>>> a.step
2
>>>
In addition, you can map a slice onto a sequence of a specific size by using its indi
ces(size) method. This returns a tuple (start, stop, step) where all values have
been suitably limited to fit within bounds (as to avoid IndexError exceptions when
indexing). For example:
>>> s = 'HelloWorld'
>>> a.indices(len(s))
(5, 10, 2)
>>> for i in range(*a.indices(len(s))):
...     print(s[i])
...
W
r
1.11. Naming a Slice  |  19
d
>>>
1.12. Determining the Most Frequently Occurring Items in
a Sequence
Problem
You have a sequence of items, and you’d like to determine the most frequently occurring
items in the sequence.
Solution
The collections.Counter class is designed for just such a problem. It even comes with
a handy most_common() method that will give you the answer.
To illustrate, let’s say you have a list of words and you want to find out which words
occur most often. Here’s how you would do it:
words = [
'look''into', 'my''eyes', 'look''into', 'my''eyes',
'the''eyes', 'the', 'eyes', 'the', 'eyes', 'not', 'around', 'the',
'eyes'"don't"'look', 'around', 'the''eyes''look', 'into',
'my''eyes'"you're"'under'
]
from collections import Counter
word_counts = Counter(words)
top_three = word_counts.most_common(3)
print(top_three)
# Outputs [('eyes', 8), ('the', 5), ('look', 4)]
Discussion
As input, Counter objects can be fed any sequence of hashable input items. Under the
covers, a Counter is a dictionary that maps the items to the number of occurrences. For
example:
>>> word_counts['not']
1
>>> word_counts['eyes']
8
>>>
If you want to increment the count manually, simply use addition:
>>> morewords = ['why','are','you','not','looking','in','my','eyes']
>>> for word in morewords:
...     word_counts[word+= 1
20  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
...
>>> word_counts['eyes']
9
>>>
Or, alternatively, you could use the update() method:
>>> word_counts.update(morewords)
>>>
A little-known feature of Counter instances is that they can be easily combined using
various mathematical operations. For example:
>>> a = Counter(words)
>>> b = Counter(morewords)
>>> a
Counter({'eyes': 8, 'the': 5, 'look': 4, 'into': 3, 'my': 3, 'around': 2,
"you're": 1, "don't": 1, 'under': 1, 'not': 1})
>>> b
Counter({'eyes': 1, 'looking': 1, 'are': 1, 'in': 1, 'not': 1, 'you': 1,
'my': 1, 'why': 1})
>>> # Combine counts
>>> c = a + b
>>> c
Counter({'eyes': 9, 'the': 5, 'look': 4, 'my': 4, 'into': 3, 'not': 2,
'around': 2, "you're": 1, "don't": 1, 'in': 1, 'why': 1,
'looking': 1, 'are': 1, 'under': 1, 'you': 1})
>>> # Subtract counts
>>> d = a - b
>>> d
Counter({'eyes': 7, 'the': 5, 'look': 4, 'into': 3, 'my': 2, 'around': 2,
"you're": 1, "don't": 1, 'under': 1})
>>>
Needless to say, Counter objects are a tremendously useful tool for almost any kind of
problem where you need to tabulate and count data. You should prefer this over man‐
ually written solutions involving dictionaries.
1.13. Sorting a List of Dictionaries by a Common Key
Problem
You have a list of dictionaries and you would like to sort the entries according to one
or more of the dictionary values.
1.13. Sorting a List of Dictionaries by a Common Key  |  21
Solution
Sorting this type of structure is easy using the operator module’s itemgetter function.
Let’s say you’ve queried a database table to get a listing of the members on your website,
and you receive the following data structure in return:
rows = [
{'fname''Brian''lname''Jones''uid'1003},
{'fname''David''lname''Beazley', 'uid': 1002},
{'fname''John', 'lname''Cleese', 'uid'1001},
{'fname''Big''lname''Jones''uid': 1004}
]
It’s fairly easy to output these rows ordered by any of the fields common to all of the
dictionaries. For example:
from operator import itemgetter
rows_by_fname = sorted(rowskey=itemgetter('fname'))
rows_by_uid = sorted(rowskey=itemgetter('uid'))
print(rows_by_fname)
print(rows_by_uid)
The preceding code would output the following:
[{'fname''Big''uid': 1004'lname''Jones'},
{'fname''Brian''uid'1003'lname''Jones'},
{'fname''David''uid'1002'lname''Beazley'},
{'fname''John', 'uid': 1001'lname''Cleese'}]
[{'fname''John', 'uid': 1001'lname''Cleese'},
{'fname''David''uid'1002'lname''Beazley'},
{'fname''Brian''uid'1003'lname''Jones'},
{'fname''Big''uid': 1004'lname''Jones'}]
The itemgetter() function can also accept multiple keys. For example, this code
rows_by_lfname = sorted(rowskey=itemgetter('lname','fname'))
print(rows_by_lfname)
Produces output like this:
[{'fname''David''uid'1002'lname''Beazley'},
{'fname''John', 'uid': 1001'lname''Cleese'},
{'fname''Big''uid': 1004'lname''Jones'},
{'fname''Brian''uid'1003'lname''Jones'}]
Discussion
In this example, rows is passed to the built-in sorted() function, which accepts a key‐
word argument key. This argument is expected to be a callable that accepts a single item
22  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested