c# pdf to tiff converter : Create pdf signature stamp SDK Library API .net asp.net html sharepoint pcb34-part432

from rows as input and returns a value that will be used as the basis for sorting. The
itemgetter() function creates just such a callable.
The operator.itemgetter() function takes as arguments the lookup indices used to
extract the desired values from the records in rows. It can be a dictionary key name, a
numeric list element, or any value that can be fed to an object’s __getitem__() method.
If you give multiple indices to itemgetter(), the callable it produces will return a tuple
with all of the elements in it, and sorted() will order the output according to the sorted
order of the tuples. This can be useful if you want to simultaneously sort on multiple
fields (such as last and first name, as shown in the example).
The functionality of itemgetter() is sometimes replaced by lambda expressions. For
example:
rows_by_fname = sorted(rowskey=lambda rr['fname'])
rows_by_lfname = sorted(rowskey=lambda r: (r['lname'],r['fname']))
This solution often  works just fine. However, the solution involving itemgetter()
typically runs a bit faster. Thus, you might prefer it if performance is a concern.
Last, but not least, don’t forget that the technique shown in this recipe can be applied
to functions such as min() and max(). For example:
>>> min(rowskey=itemgetter('uid'))
{'fname': 'John', 'lname': 'Cleese', 'uid': 1001}
>>> max(rowskey=itemgetter('uid'))
{'fname': 'Big', 'lname': 'Jones', 'uid': 1004}
>>>
1.14. Sorting Objects Without Native Comparison Support
Problem
You want to sort objects of the same class, but they don’t natively support comparison
operations.
Solution
The built-in sorted() function takes a key argument that can be passed a callable that
will return some value in the object that sorted will use to compare the objects. For
example, if you have a sequence of User instances in your application, and you want to
sort them by their user_id attribute, you would supply a callable that takes a User
instance as input and returns the user_id. For example:
>>> class User:
...     def __init__(selfuser_id):
...         self.user_id = user_id
1.14. Sorting Objects Without Native Comparison Support  |  23
Create pdf signature stamp - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
pdf add signature field; create pdf signature
Create pdf signature stamp - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
export pdf to word sign in; create a pdf signature file
...     def __repr__(self):
...         return 'User({})'.format(self.user_id)
...
>>> users = [User(23), User(3), User(99)]
>>> users
[User(23), User(3), User(99)]
>>> sorted(userskey=lambda uu.user_id)
[User(3), User(23), User(99)]
>>>
Instead of using lambda, an alternative approach is to use operator.attrgetter():
>>> from operator import attrgetter
>>> sorted(userskey=attrgetter('user_id'))
[User(3), User(23), User(99)]
>>>
Discussion
The choice of whether or not to use lambda or attrgetter() may be one of personal
preference. However, attrgetter() is often a tad bit faster and also has the added
feature of allowing multiple fields to be extracted simultaneously. This is analogous to
the use of operator.itemgetter() for dictionaries (see Recipe 1.13). For example, if
User instances also had a first_name and last_name attribute, you could perform a
sort like this:
by_name = sorted(userskey=attrgetter('last_name''first_name'))
It is also worth noting that the technique used in this recipe can be applied to functions
such as min() and max(). For example:
>>> min(userskey=attrgetter('user_id')
User(3)
>>> max(userskey=attrgetter('user_id')
User(99)
>>>
1.15. Grouping Records Together Based on a Field
Problem
You have a sequence of dictionaries or instances and you want to iterate over the data
in groups based on the value of a particular field, such as date.
Solution
The itertools.groupby() function is particularly useful for grouping data together
like this. To illustrate, suppose you have the following list of dictionaries:
24  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
PDF and Word (.docx). Annotation Tab. Item. 1. Manage Signatures. Choose to draw or type new signature and use or delete signature. 2. Create Freehand Signature.
add signature block to pdf; adding a signature to a pdf document
VB.NET TIFF: Make Custom Annotations on TIFF Image File in VB.NET
image that can be output as a PDF or any that enables users to add annotation, drawing, signature, stamp or sticky Users are also able to create and edit your
create signature field in pdf; add signature to pdf document
rows = [
{'address''5412 N CLARK', 'date': '07/01/2012'},
{'address''5148 N CLARK', 'date': '07/04/2012'},
{'address''5800 E 58TH''date': '07/02/2012'},
{'address''2122 N CLARK', 'date': '07/03/2012'},
{'address''5645 N RAVENSWOOD''date': '07/02/2012'},
{'address''1060 W ADDISON''date': '07/02/2012'},
{'address''4801 N BROADWAY', 'date': '07/01/2012'},
{'address''1039 W GRANVILLE', 'date''07/04/2012'},
]
Now suppose you want to iterate over the data in chunks grouped by date. To do it, first
sort by the desired field (in this case, date) and then use itertools.groupby():
from operator import itemgetter
from itertools import groupby
# Sort by the desired field first
rows.sort(key=itemgetter('date'))
# Iterate in groups
for dateitems in groupby(rowskey=itemgetter('date')):
print(date)
for i in items:
print(   'i)
This produces the following output:
07/01/2012
{'date': '07/01/2012', 'address': '5412 N CLARK'}
{'date': '07/01/2012', 'address': '4801 N BROADWAY'}
07/02/2012
{'date': '07/02/2012', 'address': '5800 E 58TH'}
{'date': '07/02/2012', 'address': '5645 N RAVENSWOOD'}
{'date': '07/02/2012', 'address': '1060 W ADDISON'}
07/03/2012
{'date': '07/03/2012', 'address': '2122 N CLARK'}
07/04/2012
{'date': '07/04/2012', 'address': '5148 N CLARK'}
{'date': '07/04/2012', 'address': '1039 W GRANVILLE'}
Discussion
The groupby() function works by scanning a sequence and finding sequential “runs”
of identical values (or values returned by the given key function). On each iteration, it
returns the value along with an iterator that produces all of the items in a group with
the same value.
An important preliminary step is sorting the data according to the field of interest. Since
groupby() only examines consecutive items, failing to sort first won’t group the records
as you want.
1.15. Grouping Records Together Based on a Field  |  25
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re To be specific, you can edit PDF password and digital signature, and set
pdf signatures; add signature image to pdf acrobat
C# Image: How to Add Image or Document Rubber Stamp Annotation
Have you ever thought of adding a digital signature or custom is the method that this C# rubber stamp annotator toolkit has used to create rubber stamp
click to sign pdf; add signature pdf
If your goal is to simply group the data together by dates into a large data structure that
allows  random  access,  you  may  have  better  luck  using defaultdict()  to  build  a
multidict, as described in Recipe 1.6. For example:
from collections import defaultdict
rows_by_date = defaultdict(list)
for row in rows:
rows_by_date[row['date']].append(row)
This allows the records for each date to be accessed easily like this:
>>> for r in rows_by_date['07/01/2012']:
...     print(r)
...
{'date': '07/01/2012', 'address': '5412 N CLARK'}
{'date': '07/01/2012', 'address': '4801 N BROADWAY'}
>>>
For this latter example, it’s not necessary to sort the records first. Thus, if memory is no
concern, it may be faster to do this  than to first sort the records and iterate using
groupby()
1.16. Filtering Sequence Elements
Problem
You have data inside of a sequence, and need to extract values or reduce the sequence
using some criteria.
Solution
The easiest way to filter sequence data is often to use a list comprehension. For example:
>>> mylist = [14-510-723-1]
>>> [n for n in mylist if n > 0]
[1, 4, 10, 2, 3]
>>> [n for n in mylist if n < 0]
[-5, -7, -1]
>>>
One potential downside of using a list comprehension is that it might produce a large
result if the original input is large. If this is a concern, you can use generator expressions
to produce the filtered values iteratively. For example:
>>> pos = (n for n in mylist if n > 0)
>>> pos
<generator object <genexpr> at 0x1006a0eb0>
>>> for x in pos:
...     print(x)
...
26  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
developers to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office freehand, line(s), highlight, ellipse, rectangle, rubber stamp, polygon, arrow Signature.
pdf signature; add signature to pdf acrobat
C# PowerPoint - Annotate PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
in C#, C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint Signature
add signature to pdf preview; pdf signature stamp
1
4
10
2
3
>>>
Sometimes, the filtering criteria cannot be easily expressed in a list comprehension or
generator expression. For example, suppose that the filtering process involves exception
handling or some other complicated detail. For this, put the filtering code into its own
function and use the built-in filter() function. For example:
values = ['1''2''-3''-''4''N/A''5']
def is_int(val):
try:
x = int(val)
return True
except ValueError:
return False
ivals = list(filter(is_intvalues))
print(ivals)
# Outputs ['1', '2', '-3', '4', '5']
filter() creates an iterator, so if you want to create a list of results, make sure you also
use list() as shown.
Discussion
List comprehensions and generator expressions are often the easiest and most straight‐
forward ways to filter simple data. They also have the added power to transform the
data at the same time. For example:
>>> mylist = [14-510-723-1]
>>> import math
>>> [math.sqrt(nfor n in mylist if n > 0]
[1.0, 2.0, 3.1622776601683795, 1.4142135623730951, 1.7320508075688772]
>>>
One variation on filtering involves replacing the values that don’t meet the criteria with
a new value instead of discarding them. For example, perhaps instead of just finding
positive values, you want to also clip bad values to fit within a specified range. This is
often easily accomplished by moving the filter criterion into a conditional expression
like this:
>>> clip_neg = [n if n > 0 else 0 for n in mylist]
>>> clip_neg
[1, 4, 0, 10, 0, 2, 3, 0]
>>> clip_pos = [n if n < 0 else 0 for n in mylist]
>>> clip_pos
1.16. Filtering Sequence Elements  |  27
C# Word - Annotate Word Page in C#.NET
in C#, C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint Signature
pdf sign in; adding signature to pdf form
VB.NET Image: How to Generate Freehand Annotation Through VB.NET
drawn as an annotation on documents, like PDF. annotation control enables you to create flexible hot stamp (user-specific electronic signature) on documents
create signature from pdf; add signature to pdf in preview
[0, 0, -5, 0, -7, 0, 0, -1]
>>>
Another notable filtering tool is itertools.compress(), which takes an iterable and
an accompanying Boolean selector sequence as input. As output, it gives you all of the
items in the iterable where the corresponding element in the selector is True. This can
be useful if you’re trying to apply the results of filtering one sequence to another related
sequence. For example, suppose you have the following two columns of data:
addresses = [
'5412 N CLARK',
'5148 N CLARK',
'5800 E 58TH',
'2122 N CLARK'
'5645 N RAVENSWOOD',
'1060 W ADDISON',
'4801 N BROADWAY',
'1039 W GRANVILLE',
]
counts = [ 031041761]
Now suppose you want to make a list of all addresses where the corresponding count
value was greater than 5. Here’s how you could do it:
>>> from itertools import compress
>>> more5 = [n > 5 for n in counts]
>>> more5
[False, False, True, False, False, True, True, False]
>>> list(compress(addressesmore5))
['5800 E 58TH', '4801 N BROADWAY', '1039 W GRANVILLE']
>>>
The key here is to first create a sequence of Booleans that indicates which elements
satisfy the desired condition. The compress() function then picks out the items corre‐
sponding to True values.
Like filter()compress() normally returns an iterator. Thus, you need to use list()
to turn the results into a list if desired.
1.17. Extracting a Subset of a Dictionary
Problem
You want to make a dictionary that is a subset of another dictionary.
28  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
XDoc.Excel for .NET, Comprehensive .NET Excel Imaging Features
Convert Excel to PDF; Convert Excel to HTML5; Convert Create Excel with one blank page; Load Excel polygon, lines, rubber stamp, callout, arrow, signature, etc.
create pdf signature stamp; pdf converter sign in
XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to HTML5; Create PowerPoint with one blank page; Load PowerPoint Lines, Rubber Stamp, Callout, Arrow, Signature, etc
copy and paste signature into pdf; adding signature to pdf document
Solution
This is easily accomplished using a dictionary comprehension. For example:
prices = {
'ACME'45.23,
'AAPL'612.78,
'IBM'205.55,
'HPQ'37.20,
'FB'10.75
}
# Make a dictionary of all prices over 200
p1 = { key:value for keyvalue in prices.items() if value > 200 }
# Make a dictionary of tech stocks
tech_names = { 'AAPL''IBM''HPQ''MSFT' }
p2 = { key:value for key,value in prices.items() if key in tech_names }
Discussion
Much of what can be accomplished with a dictionary comprehension might also be done
by creating a sequence of tuples and passing them to the dict() function. For example:
p1 = dict((keyvaluefor keyvalue in prices.items() if value > 200)
However, the dictionary comprehension solution is a bit clearer and actually runs quite
a bit faster (over twice as fast when tested on the prices dictionary used in the example).
Sometimes there are multiple ways of accomplishing the same thing. For instance, the
second example could be rewritten as:
# Make a dictionary of tech stocks
tech_names = { 'AAPL''IBM''HPQ''MSFT' }
p2 = { key:prices[keyfor key in prices.keys() & tech_names }
However, a timing study reveals that this solution is almost 1.6 times slower than the
first solution. If performance matters, it usually pays to spend a bit of time studying it.
See Recipe 14.13 for specific information about timing and profiling.
1.18. Mapping Names to Sequence Elements
Problem
You have code that accesses list or tuple elements by position, but this makes the code
somewhat difficult to read at times. You’d also like to be less dependent on position in
the structure, by accessing the elements by name.
1.18. Mapping Names to Sequence Elements  |  29
Solution
collections.namedtuple() provides these benefits, while adding minimal overhead
over using a  normal tuple object. collections.namedtuple()  is actually  a factory
method that returns a subclass of the standard Python tuple type. You feed it a type
name, and the fields it should have, and it returns a class that you can instantiate, passing
in values for the fields you’ve defined, and so on. For example:
>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> Subscriber = namedtuple('Subscriber', ['addr''joined'])
>>> sub = Subscriber('jonesy@example.com''2012-10-19')
>>> sub
Subscriber(addr='jonesy@example.com'joined='2012-10-19')
>>> sub.addr
'jonesy@example.com'
>>> sub.joined
'2012-10-19'
>>>
Although an instance of a namedtuple looks like a normal class instance, it is inter‐
changeable with a tuple and supports all of the usual tuple operations such as indexing
and unpacking. For example:
>>> len(sub)
2
>>> addrjoined = sub
>>> addr
'jonesy@example.com'
>>> joined
'2012-10-19'
>>>
A major use case for named tuples is decoupling your code from the position of the
elements it manipulates. So, if you get back a large list of tuples from a database call,
then manipulate them by accessing the positional elements, your code could break if,
say, you added a new column to your table. Not so if you first cast the returned tuples
to namedtuples.
To illustrate, here is some code using ordinary tuples:
def compute_cost(records):
total = 0.0
for rec in records:
total += rec[1* rec[2]
return total
References to positional elements often make the code a bit less expressive and more
dependent on the structure of the records. Here is a version that uses a namedtuple:
from collections import namedtuple
Stock = namedtuple('Stock', ['name''shares''price'])
30  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
def compute_cost(records):
total = 0.0
for rec in records:
s = Stock(*rec)
total += s.shares * s.price
return total
Naturally, you can avoid the explicit conversion to the Stock namedtuple if the records
sequence in the example already contained such instances.
Discussion
One possible use of a namedtuple is as a replacement for a dictionary, which requires
more space to store. Thus, if you are building large data structures involving dictionaries,
use of a namedtuple will be more efficient. However, be aware that unlike a dictionary,
namedtuple is immutable. For example:
>>> s = Stock('ACME'100123.45)
>>> s
Stock(name='ACME'shares=100price=123.45)
>>> s.shares = 75
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeErrorcan't set attribute
>>>
If you need to change any of the attributes, it can be done using the _replace() method
of a namedtuple instance, which makes an entirely new namedtuple with specified val‐
ues replaced. For example:
>>> s = s._replace(shares=75)
>>> s
Stock(name='ACME', shares=75, price=123.45)
>>>
A subtle use of the _replace() method is that it can be a convenient way to populate
named tuples that have optional or missing fields. To do this, you make a prototype
tuple containing the default values and then use _replace() to create new instances
with values replaced. For example:
from collections import namedtuple
Stock = namedtuple('Stock', ['name''shares''price''date''time'])
# Create a prototype instance
stock_prototype = Stock(''00.0NoneNone)
# Function to convert a dictionary to a Stock
def dict_to_stock(s):
return stock_prototype._replace(**s)
1.18. Mapping Names to Sequence Elements  |  31
Here is an example of how this code would work:
>>> a = {'name''ACME''shares'100'price'123.45}
>>> dict_to_stock(a)
Stock(name='ACME', shares=100, price=123.45, date=None, time=None)
>>> b = {'name''ACME''shares'100'price'123.45'date''12/17/2012'}
>>> dict_to_stock(b)
Stock(name='ACME', shares=100, price=123.45, date='12/17/2012', time=None)
>>>
Last, but not least, it should be noted that if your goal is to define an efficient data
structure where you will be changing various instance attributes, using namedtuple is
not your best choice. Instead, consider defining a class using __slots__ instead (see
Recipe 8.4).
1.19. Transforming and Reducing Data at the Same Time
Problem
You need to execute a reduction function (e.g., sum()min()max()), but first need to
transform or filter the data.
Solution
A very elegant way to combine a data reduction and a transformation  is  to use a 
generator-expression  argument.  For  example,  if  you  want  to  calculate  the  sum  of
squares, do the following:
nums = [12345]
s = sum(x * x for x in nums)
Here are a few other examples:
# Determine if any .py files exist in a directory
import os
files = os.listdir('dirname')
if any(name.endswith('.py'for name in files):
print('There be python!')
else:
print('Sorry, no python.')
# Output a tuple as CSV
s = ('ACME'50123.45)
print(','.join(str(xfor x in s))
# Data reduction across fields of a data structure
portfolio = [
{'name':'GOOG''shares': 50},
{'name':'YHOO''shares': 75},
{'name':'AOL''shares': 20},
32  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested