c# pdf to tiff converter : Add signature pdf SDK application service wpf html winforms dnn pcb35-part443

{'name':'SCOX''shares': 65}
]
min_shares = min(s['shares'for s in portfolio)
Discussion
The solution shows a subtle syntactic aspect of generator expressions when supplied as
the single argument to a function (i.e., you don’t need repeated parentheses). For ex‐
ample, these statements are the same:
s = sum((x * x for x in nums))    # Pass generator-expr as argument
s = sum(x * x for x in nums)      # More elegant syntax
Using a generator argument is often a more efficient and elegant approach than first
creating a temporary list. For example, if you didn’t use a generator expression, you
might consider this alternative implementation:
nums = [12345]
s = sum([x * x for x in nums])
This works, but it introduces an extra step and creates an extra list. For such a small list,
it might not matter, but if nums was huge, you would end up creating a large temporary
data structure to only be used once and discarded. The generator solution transforms
the data iteratively and is therefore much more memory-efficient.
Certain reduction functions such as min() and max() accept a key argument that might
be useful in situations where you might be inclined to use a generator. For example, in
the portfolio example, you might consider this alternative:
# Original: Returns 20
min_shares = min(s['shares'for s in portfolio)
# Alternative: Returns {'name': 'AOL', 'shares': 20}
min_shares = min(portfoliokey=lambda ss['shares'])
1.20. Combining Multiple Mappings into a Single
Mapping
Problem
You have multiple dictionaries or mappings that you want to logically combine into a
single mapping to perform certain operations, such as looking up values or checking
for the existence of keys.
Solution
Suppose you have two dictionaries:
1.20. Combining Multiple Mappings into a Single Mapping  |  33
Add signature pdf - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
create pdf signature box; create signature field in pdf
Add signature pdf - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
add signature to preview pdf; add signature to pdf file
a = {'x'1'z'3 }
b = {'y'2'z'4 }
Now suppose you want to perform lookups where you have to check both dictionaries
(e.g., first checking in a and then in b if not found). An easy way to do this is to use the
ChainMap class from the collections module. For example:
from collections import ChainMap
c = ChainMap(a,b)
print(c['x'])      # Outputs 1  (from a)
print(c['y'])      # Outputs 2  (from b)
print(c['z'])      # Outputs 3  (from a)
Discussion
ChainMap takes multiple mappings and makes them logically appear as one. However,
the mappings are not literally merged together. Instead, a ChainMap simply keeps a list
of the underlying mappings and redefines common dictionary operations to scan the
list. Most operations will work. For example:
>>> len(c)
3
>>> list(c.keys())
['x', 'y', 'z']
>>> list(c.values())
[1, 2, 3]
>>>
If there are duplicate keys, the values from the first mapping get used. Thus, the entry
c['z'] in the example would always refer to the value in dictionary a, not the value in
dictionary b.
Operations that mutate the mapping always affect the first mapping listed. For example:
>>> c['z'= 10
>>> c['w'= 40
>>> del c['x']
>>> a
{'w': 40, 'z': 10}
>>> del c['y']
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
KeyError: "Key not found in the first mapping'y'"
>>>
ChainMap is particularly useful when working with scoped values such as variables in
a programming language (i.e., globals, locals, etc.). In fact, there are methods that make
this easy:
34  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
things. Add a signature or an empty signature field in any PDF file page. Search unsigned signature field in PDF document. Prepare
create pdf stamp signature; create a pdf signature file
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
things. Add a signature or an empty signature field in any PDF file page. Search unsigned signature field in PDF document. Prepare
pdf create signature; create pdf signature stamp
>>> values = ChainMap()
>>> values['x'= 1
>>> # Add a new mapping
>>> values = values.new_child()
>>> values['x'= 2
>>> # Add a new mapping
>>> values = values.new_child()
>>> values['x'= 3
>>> values
ChainMap({'x'3}, {'x'2}, {'x'1})
>>> values['x']
3
>>> # Discard last mapping
>>> values = values.parents
>>> values['x']
2
>>> # Discard last mapping
>>> values = values.parents
>>> values['x']
1
>>> values
ChainMap({'x'1})
>>>
As an alternative to ChainMap, you might consider merging dictionaries together using
the update() method. For example:
>>> a = {'x'1'z'3 }
>>> b = {'y'2'z'4 }
>>> merged = dict(b)
>>> merged.update(a)
>>> merged['x']
1
>>> merged['y']
2
>>> merged['z']
3
>>>
This works, but it requires you to make a completely separate dictionary object (or
destructively alter one of the existing dictionaries). Also, if any of the original diction‐
aries mutate, the changes don’t get reflected in the merged dictionary. For example:
>>> a['x'= 13
>>> merged['x']
1
ChainMap uses the original dictionaries, so it doesn’t have this behavior. For example:
1.20. Combining Multiple Mappings into a Single Mapping  |  35
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in C#.NET class application?
adding signature to pdf document; pdf export sign in
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET enables you to create signatures to PDF, including freehand signature, text and date signature. If you need to add your own signatures
add a signature to a pdf file; pdf signature stamp
>>> a = {'x'1'z'3 }
>>> b = {'y'2'z'4 }
>>> merged = ChainMap(ab)
>>> merged['x']
1
>>> a['x'= 42
>>> merged['x'  # Notice change to merged dicts
42
>>>
36  |  Chapter 1: Data Structures and Algorithms
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create Viewer for C# .NET Signatures supports add signatures to Word and remove signature from Word
adding a signature to a pdf document; export pdf sign in
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
functionalities. convert Tiff file to PDF, add annotations to Tiff, Create signature on tiff, etc. Please refer to more details below:
copy and paste signature into pdf; pdf signatures
CHAPTER 2
Strings and Text
Almost every useful program involves some kind of text processing, whether it is parsing
data or generating output. This chapter focuses on common problems involving text
manipulation, such as pulling apart strings, searching, substitution, lexing, and parsing.
Many of these tasks can be easily solved using built-in methods of strings. However,
more complicated operations might require the use of regular expressions or the cre‐
ation of a full-fledged parser. All of these topics are covered. In addition, a few tricky
aspects of working with Unicode are addressed.
2.1. Splitting Strings on Any of Multiple Delimiters
Problem
You need to split a string into fields, but the delimiters (and spacing around them) aren’t
consistent throughout the string.
Solution
The split() method of string objects is really meant for very simple cases, and does
not allow for multiple delimiters or account for possible whitespace around the delim‐
iters. In cases when you need a bit more flexibility, use the re.split() method:
>>> line = 'asdf fjdk; afed, fjek,asdf,      foo'
>>> import re
>>> re.split(r'[;,\s]\s*'line)
['asdf''fjdk''afed', 'fjek', 'asdf''foo']
Discussion
The re.split() function is useful because you can specify multiple patterns for the
separator. For example, as shown in the solution, the separator is either a comma (,),
37
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Viewer provides other utility features for processing Tiff while in preview, such as convert Tiff file to PDF, add annotations to Tiff, Create signature on tiff
create pdf signature; add signature pdf preview
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields; Create signatures in new fields which hold the signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit
add signature to pdf reader; add signature image to pdf
semicolon (;), or whitespace followed by any amount of extra whitespace. Whenever
that pattern is found, the entire match becomes the delimiter between whatever fields
lie on either side of the match. The result is a list of fields, just as with str.split().
When using re.split(), you need to be a bit careful should the regular expression
pattern involve a capture group enclosed in parentheses. If capture groups are used,
then the matched text is also included in the result. For example, watch what happens
here:
>>> fields = re.split(r'(;|,|\s)\s*'line)
>>> fields
['asdf', ' ', 'fjdk', ';', 'afed', ',', 'fjek', ',', 'asdf', ',', 'foo']
>>>
Getting the split characters might be useful in certain contexts. For example, maybe you
need the split characters later on to reform an output string:
>>> values = fields[::2]
>>> delimiters = fields[1::2+ ['']
>>> values
['asdf', 'fjdk', 'afed', 'fjek', 'asdf', 'foo']
>>> delimiters
[' ', ';', ',', ',', ',', '']
>>> # Reform the line using the same delimiters
>>> ''.join(v+d for v,d in zip(valuesdelimiters))
'asdf fjdk;afed,fjek,asdf,foo'
>>>
If you don’t want the separator characters in the result, but still need to use parentheses
to group parts of the regular expression pattern, make sure you use a noncapture group,
specified as (?:...). For example:
>>> re.split(r'(?:,|;|\s)\s*'line)
['asdf', 'fjdk', 'afed', 'fjek', 'asdf', 'foo']
>>>
2.2. Matching Text at the Start or End of a String
Problem
You need to check the start or end of a string for specific text patterns, such as filename
extensions, URL schemes, and so on.
Solution
A simple way to check the beginning or end of a string is to use the str.starts
with() or str.endswith() methods. For example:
38  |  Chapter 2: Strings and Text
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
adding a signature to a pdf; create pdf with signature field
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. To be specific, you can edit PDF password and digital signature, and set PDF file
add signature to pdf document; sign pdf online
>>> filename = 'spam.txt'
>>> filename.endswith('.txt')
True
>>> filename.startswith('file:')
False
>>> url = 'http://www.python.org'
>>> url.startswith('http:')
True
>>>
If you need to check against multiple choices, simply provide a tuple of possibilities to
startswith() or endswith():
>>> import os
>>> filenames = os.listdir('.')
>>> filenames
[ 'Makefile', 'foo.c', 'bar.py', 'spam.c', 'spam.h' ]
>>> [name for name in filenames if name.endswith(('.c''.h')) ]
['foo.c', 'spam.c', 'spam.h'
>>> any(name.endswith('.py'for name in filenames)
True
>>>
Here is another example:
from urllib.request import urlopen
def read_data(name):
if name.startswith(('http:', 'https:', 'ftp:')):
return urlopen(name).read()
else:
with open(name) as f:
return f.read()
Oddly, this is one part of Python where a tuple is actually required as input. If you happen
to have the choices specified in a list or set, just make sure you convert them using
tuple() first. For example:
>>> choices = ['http:''ftp:']
>>> url = 'http://www.python.org'
>>> url.startswith(choices)
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeErrorstartswith first arg must be str or a tuple of str, not list
>>> url.startswith(tuple(choices))
True
>>>
2.2. Matching Text at the Start or End of a String  |  39
Discussion
The startswith() and endswith() methods provide a very convenient way to perform
basic prefix and suffix checking. Similar operations can be performed with slices, but
are far less elegant. For example:
>>> filename = 'spam.txt'
>>> filename[-4:] == '.txt'
True
>>> url = 'http://www.python.org'
>>> url[:5== 'http:' or url[:6== 'https:' or url[:4== 'ftp:'
True
>>>
You might also be inclined to use regular expressions as an alternative. For example:
>>> import re
>>> url = 'http://www.python.org'
>>> re.match('http:|https:|ftp:'url)
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x101253098>
>>>
This works, but is often overkill for simple matching. Using this recipe is simpler and
runs faster.
Last, but not least, the startswith() and endswith() methods look nice when com‐
bined with other operations, such as common data reductions. For example, this state‐
ment that checks a directory for the presence of certain kinds of files:
if any(name.endswith(('.c''.h')) for name in listdir(dirname)):
...
2.3. Matching Strings Using Shell Wildcard Patterns
Problem
You want to match text using the same wildcard patterns as are commonly used when
working in Unix shells (e.g., *.pyDat[0-9]*.csv, etc.).
Solution
The fnmatch module provides two functions—fnmatch() and fnmatchcase()—that
can be used to perform such matching. The usage is simple:
>>> from fnmatch import fnmatchfnmatchcase
>>> fnmatch('foo.txt''*.txt')
True
>>> fnmatch('foo.txt''?oo.txt')
True
>>> fnmatch('Dat45.csv''Dat[0-9]*')
40  |  Chapter 2: Strings and Text
True
>>> names = ['Dat1.csv''Dat2.csv''config.ini''foo.py']
>>> [name for name in names if fnmatch(name'Dat*.csv')]
['Dat1.csv', 'Dat2.csv']
>>>
Normally, fnmatch() matches patterns using the same case-sensitivity rules as the sys‐
tem’s underlying filesystem (which varies based on operating system). For example:
>>> # On OS X (Mac)
>>> fnmatch('foo.txt''*.TXT')
False
>>> # On Windows
>>> fnmatch('foo.txt''*.TXT')
True
>>>
If this distinction matters, use fnmatchcase() instead. It matches exactly based on the
lower- and uppercase conventions that you supply:
>>> fnmatchcase('foo.txt''*.TXT')
False
>>>
An often overlooked feature of these functions is their potential use with data processing
of nonfilename strings. For example, suppose you have a list of street addresses like this:
addresses = [
'5412 N CLARK ST',
'1060 W ADDISON ST',
'1039 W GRANVILLE AVE',
'2122 N CLARK ST',
'4802 N BROADWAY',
]
You could write list comprehensions like this:
>>> from fnmatch import fnmatchcase
>>> [addr for addr in addresses if fnmatchcase(addr'* ST')]
['5412 N CLARK ST', '1060 W ADDISON ST', '2122 N CLARK ST']
>>> [addr for addr in addresses if fnmatchcase(addr'54[0-9][0-9] *CLARK*')]
['5412 N CLARK ST']
>>>
Discussion
The matching performed by fnmatch sits somewhere between the functionality of sim‐
ple string methods and the full power of regular expressions. If you’re just trying to
provide a simple mechanism for allowing wildcards in data processing operations, it’s
often a reasonable solution.
2.3. Matching Strings Using Shell Wildcard Patterns  |  41
If you’re actually trying to write code that matches filenames, use the glob module
instead. See Recipe 5.13.
2.4. Matching and Searching for Text Patterns
Problem
You want to match or search text for a specific pattern.
Solution
If the text you’re trying to match is a simple literal, you can often just use the basic string
methods, such as str.find()str.endswith(), str.startswith(), or similar. For
example:
>>> text = 'yeah, but no, but yeah, but no, but yeah'
>>> # Exact match
>>> text == 'yeah'
False
>>> # Match at start or end
>>> text.startswith('yeah')
True
>>> text.endswith('no')
False
>>> # Search for the location of the first occurrence
>>> text.find('no')
10
>>>
For more complicated matching, use regular expressions and the re module. To illus‐
trate the basic mechanics of using regular expressions, suppose you want to match dates
specified as digits, such as “11/27/2012.” Here is a sample of how you would do it:
>>> text1 = '11/27/2012'
>>> text2 = 'Nov 27, 2012'
>>>
>>> import re
>>> # Simple matching: \d+ means match one or more digits
>>> if re.match(r'\d+/\d+/\d+'text1):
...     print('yes')
... else:
...     print('no')
...
yes
>>> if re.match(r'\d+/\d+/\d+'text2):
...     print('yes')
... else:
42  |  Chapter 2: Strings and Text
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested