c# pdf to tiff converter : Add signature to pdf acrobat reader Library software class asp.net windows html ajax pcb355-part449

The fileno() method is what makes the queue pollable using a function such as se
lect(). Essentially, it just exposes the underlying file descriptor of the socket used by
the get() function.
Here is an example of some code that defines a consumer which monitors multiple
queues for incoming items:
import select
import threading
def consumer(queues):
'''
Consumer that reads data on multiple queues simultaneously
'''
while True:
can_read__ = select.select(queues,[],[])
for r in can_read:
item = r.get()
print('Got:'item)
q1 = PollableQueue()
q2 = PollableQueue()
q3 = PollableQueue()
t = threading.Thread(target=consumerargs=([q1,q2,q3],))
t.daemon = True
t.start()
# Feed data to the queues
q1.put(1)
q2.put(10)
q3.put('hello')
q2.put(15)
...
If you try it, you’ll find that the consumer indeed receives all of the put items, regardless
of which queues they are placed in.
Discussion
The problem of polling non-file-like objects, such as queues, is often a lot trickier than
it looks. For instance, if you don’t use the socket technique shown, your only option is
to write code that cycles through the queues and uses a timer, like this:
import time
def consumer(queues):
while True:
for q in queues:
if not q.empty():
item = q.get()
print('Got:'item)
12.13. Polling Multiple Thread Queues  |  533
Add signature to pdf acrobat reader - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
copy and paste signature into pdf; pdf sign in
Add signature to pdf acrobat reader - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
pdf converter sign in; add signature to pdf document
# Sleep briefly to avoid 100% CPU
time.sleep(0.01)
This might work for certain kinds of problems, but it’s clumsy and introduces other
weird performance problems. For example, if new data is added to a queue, it won’t be
detected for as long as 10 milliseconds (an eternity on a modern processor).
You run into even further problems if the preceding polling is mixed with the polling
of other objects, such as network sockets. For example, if you want to poll both sockets
and queues at the same time, you might have to use code like this:
import select
def event_loop(socketsqueues):
while True:
# polling with a timeout
can_read__ = select.select(sockets, [], [], 0.01)
for r in can_read:
handle_read(r)
for q in queues:
if not q.empty():
item = q.get()
print('Got:'item)
The solution shown solves a lot of these problems by simply putting queues on equal
status with sockets. A single select() call can be used to poll for activity on both. It is
not necessary to use timeouts or other time-based hacks to periodically check. More‐
over, if data gets added to a queue, the consumer will be notified almost instantaneously.
Although there is a tiny amount of overhead associated with the underlying I/O, it often
is worth it to have better response time and simplified coding.
12.14. Launching a Daemon Process on Unix
Problem
You would like to write a program that runs as a proper daemon process on Unix or
Unix-like systems.
Solution
Creating a proper daemon process requires a precise sequence of system calls and careful
attention to detail. The following code shows how to define a daemon process along
with the ability to easily stop it once launched:
#!/usr/bin/env python3
# daemon.py
import os
import sys
534  |  Chapter 12: Concurrency
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print
export pdf sign in; add signature to pdf acrobat reader
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
add signature to pdf in preview; add signature to pdf file
import atexit
import signal
def daemonize(pidfile*stdin='/dev/null',
stdout='/dev/null',
stderr='/dev/null'):
if os.path.exists(pidfile):
raise RuntimeError('Already running')
# First fork (detaches from parent)
try:
if os.fork() > 0:
raise SystemExit(0)   # Parent exit
except OSError as e:
raise RuntimeError('fork #1 failed.')
os.chdir('/')
os.umask(0)
os.setsid()
# Second fork (relinquish session leadership)
try:
if os.fork() > 0:
raise SystemExit(0)
except OSError as e:
raise RuntimeError('fork #2 failed.')
# Flush I/O buffers
sys.stdout.flush()
sys.stderr.flush()
# Replace file descriptors for stdin, stdout, and stderr
with open(stdin'rb'0as f:
os.dup2(f.fileno(), sys.stdin.fileno())
with open(stdout, 'ab'0as f:
os.dup2(f.fileno(), sys.stdout.fileno())
with open(stderr, 'ab'0as f:
os.dup2(f.fileno(), sys.stderr.fileno())
# Write the PID file
with open(pidfile,'w'as f:
print(os.getpid(),file=f)
# Arrange to have the PID file removed on exit/signal
atexit.register(lambdaos.remove(pidfile))
# Signal handler for termination (required)
def sigterm_handler(signo, frame):
raise SystemExit(1)
signal.signal(signal.SIGTERMsigterm_handler)
12.14. Launching a Daemon Process on Unix  |  535
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Allow to create digital signature. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
adding a signature to a pdf; adding signature to pdf document
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
PDF files to GIF images with high quality. It can be functioned as an integrated component without the use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat Reader.
adding a signature to a pdf file; create pdf signature stamp
def main():
import time
sys.stdout.write('Daemon started with pid {}\n'.format(os.getpid()))
while True:
sys.stdout.write('Daemon Alive! {}\n'.format(time.ctime()))
time.sleep(10)
if __name__ == '__main__':
PIDFILE = '/tmp/daemon.pid'
if len(sys.argv) != 2:
print('Usage: {} [start|stop]'.format(sys.argv[0]), file=sys.stderr)
raise SystemExit(1)
if sys.argv[1== 'start':
try:
daemonize(PIDFILE,
stdout='/tmp/daemon.log',
stderr='/tmp/dameon.log')
except RuntimeError as e:
print(efile=sys.stderr)
raise SystemExit(1)
main()
elif sys.argv[1== 'stop':
if os.path.exists(PIDFILE):
with open(PIDFILE) as f:
os.kill(int(f.read()), signal.SIGTERM)
else:
print('Not running'file=sys.stderr)
raise SystemExit(1)
else:
print('Unknown command {!r}'.format(sys.argv[1]), file=sys.stderr)
raise SystemExit(1)
To launch the daemon, the user would use a command like this:
bash % daemon.py start
bash % cat /tmp/daemon.pid
2882
bash % tail -f /tmp/daemon.log
Daemon started with pid 2882
Daemon Alive! Fri Oct 12 13:45:37 2012
Daemon Alive! Fri Oct 12 13:45:47 2012
...
Daemon processes run entirely in the background, so the command returns immedi‐
ately. However, you can view its associated pid file and log, as just shown. To stop the
daemon, use:
536  |  Chapter 12: Concurrency
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
add signature to pdf; pdf add signature field
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
Different from other image converters, users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any other print drivers when they use DICOM to PDF Converter.
add signature block to pdf; adding a signature to a pdf in preview
bash % daemon.py stop
bash %
Discussion
This recipe defines a function daemonize() that should be called at program startup to
make the program run as a daemon. The signature to daemonize() is using keyword-
only arguments to make the purpose of the optional arguments more clear when used.
This forces the user to use a call such as this:
daemonize('daemon.pid',
stdin='/dev/null,
stdout='/tmp/daemon.log',
stderr='/tmp/daemon.log')
As opposed to a more cryptic call such as:
# Illegal. Must use keyword arguments
daemonize('daemon.pid',
'/dev/null''/tmp/daemon.log','/tmp/daemon.log')
The steps involved in creating a daemon are fairly cryptic, but the general idea is as
follows. First, a daemon has to detach itself from its parent process. This is the purpose
of the first os.fork() operation and immediate termination by the parent.
After the child has been orphaned, the call to os.setsid() creates an entirely new
process session and sets the child as the leader. This also sets the child as the leader of
a new process group and makes sure there is no controlling terminal. If this all sounds
a bit too magical, it has to do with getting the daemon to detach properly from the
terminal and making sure that things like signals don’t interfere with its operation.
The calls to os.chdir() and os.umask(0) change the current working directory and
reset the file mode mask. Changing the directory is usually a good idea so that the
daemon is no longer working in the directory from which it was launched.
The second call to os.fork() is by far the more mysterious operation here. This step
makes the daemon process give up the ability to acquire a new controlling terminal and
provides even more isolation (essentially, the daemon gives up its session leadership
and thus no longer has the permission to open controlling terminals). Although you
could probably omit this step, it’s typically recommended.
Once the daemon process has been properly detached, it performs steps to reinitialize
the standard I/O streams to point at files specified by the user. This part is actually
somewhat tricky. References to file objects associated with the standard I/O streams are
found in multiple places in the interpreter (sys.stdoutsys.__stdout__, etc.). Simply
closing sys.stdout and reassigning it is not likely to work correctly, because there’s no
way to know if it will fix all uses of sys.stdout. Instead, a separate file object is opened,
and the os.dup2() call is used to have it replace the file descriptor currently being used
12.14. Launching a Daemon Process on Unix  |  537
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
PDF to TIFF Converter doesn't require other third-party such as Adobe Acrobat. PDF to TIFF Converter can create the output TIFF image with 68-1024 dpi.
pdf to word converter sign in; add a signature to a pdf file
by sys.stdout. When this happens, the original file for sys.stdout will be closed and
the new one takes its place. It must be emphasized that any file encoding or text handling
already applied to the standard I/O streams will remain in place.
A common practice with daemon processes is to write the process ID of the daemon in
a file for later use by other programs. The last part of the daemonize() function writes
this file, but also arranges to have the file removed on program termination. The atex
it.register() function registers a function to execute when the Python interpreter
terminates. The definition of a signal handler for SIGTERM is also required for a graceful
termination. The signal handler merely raises SystemExit() and nothing more. This
might look unnecessary, but without it, termination signals kill the interpreter without
performing the cleanup actions registered with atexit.register(). An example of
code that kills the daemon can be found in the handling of the stop command at the
end of the program.
More information about writing daemon processes can be found in Advanced Pro‐
gramming in the UNIX Environment, 2nd Edition, by W. Richard Stevens and Stephen
A. Rago (Addison-Wesley, 2005). Although focused on C programming, all of the ma‐
terial is easily adapted to Python, since all of the required POSIX functions are available
in the standard library.
538  |  Chapter 12: Concurrency
CHAPTER 13
Utility Scripting and System Administration
A lot of people use Python as a replacement for shell scripts, using it to automate com‐
mon system tasks, such as manipulating files, configuring systems, and so forth. The
main goal of this chapter is to describe features related to common tasks encountered
when writing scripts. For example, parsing command-line options, manipulating files
on the filesystem, getting useful system configuration data, and so forth. Chapter 5 also
contains general information related to files and directories.
13.1. Accepting Script Input via Redirection, Pipes, or
Input Files
Problem
You want a script you’ve written to be able to accept input using whatever mechanism
is easiest for the user. This should include piping output from a command to the script,
redirecting a file into the script, or just passing a filename, or list of filenames, to the
script on the command line.
Solution
Python’s built-in fileinput module makes this very simple and concise. If you have a
script that looks like this:
#!/usr/bin/env python3
import fileinput
with fileinput.input() as f_input:
for line in f_input:
print(lineend='')
539
Then you can already accept input to the script in all of the previously mentioned ways.
If you save this script as filein.py and make it executable, you can do all of the following
and get the expected output:
ls | ./filein.py          # Prints a directory listing to stdout.
./filein.py /etc/passwd   # Reads /etc/passwd to stdout.
./filein.py < /etc/passwd # Reads /etc/passwd to stdout.
Discussion
The fileinput.input() function creates and returns an instance of the FileInput
class. In addition to containing a few handy helper methods, the instance can also be
used as a context manager. So, to put all of this together, if we wrote a script that expected
to be printing output from several files at once, we might have it include the filename
and line number in the output, like this:
>>> import fileinput
>>> with fileinput.input('/etc/passwd'as f:
>>>     for line in f:
...         print(f.filename(), f.lineno(), lineend='')
...
/etc/passwd 1 ##
/etc/passwd 2 # User Database
/etc/passwd 3 #
<other output omitted>
Using it as a context manager ensures that the file is closed when it’s no longer being
used, and we leveraged a few handy FileInput helper methods here to get some extra
information in the output.
13.2. Terminating a Program with an Error Message
Problem
You want your program to terminate by printing a message to standard error and re‐
turning a nonzero status code.
Solution
To have a program terminate in this manner, raise a SystemExit exception, but supply
the error message as an argument. For example:
raise SystemExit('It failed!')
This will cause the supplied message to be printed to sys.stderr and the program to
exit with a status code of 1.
540  |  Chapter 13: Utility Scripting and System Administration
Discussion
This is a small recipe, but it solves a common problem that arises when writing scripts.
Namely, to terminate a program, you might be inclined to write code like this:
import sys
sys.stderr.write('It failed!\n')
raise SystemExit(1)
None of the extra steps involving import or writing to sys.stderr are neccessary if you
simply supply the message to SystemExit() instead.
13.3. Parsing Command-Line Options
Problem
You want to write a program that parses options supplied on the command line (found
in sys.argv).
Solution
The argparse module can be used to parse command-line options. A simple example
will help to illustrate the essential features:
# search.py
'''
Hypothetical command-line tool for searching a collection of
files for one or more text patterns.
'''
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='Search some files')
parser.add_argument(dest='filenames',metavar='filename'nargs='*')
parser.add_argument('-p''--pat',metavar='pattern'required=True,
dest='patterns'action='append',
help='text pattern to search for')
parser.add_argument('-v'dest='verbose'action='store_true',
help='verbose mode')
parser.add_argument('-o'dest='outfile'action='store',
help='output file')
parser.add_argument('--speed'dest='speed'action='store',
choices={'slow','fast'}, default='slow',
help='search speed')
args = parser.parse_args()
13.3. Parsing Command-Line Options  |  541
# Output the collected arguments
print(args.filenames)
print(args.patterns)
print(args.verbose)
print(args.outfile)
print(args.speed)
This program defines a command-line parser with the following usage:
bash % python3 search.py -h
usage: search.py [-h] [-p pattern] [-v] [-o OUTFILE] [--speed {slow,fast}]
[filename [filename ...]]
Search some files
positional arguments:
filename
optional arguments:
-h, --help            show this help message and exit
-p pattern, --pat pattern
text pattern to search for
-v                    verbose mode
-o OUTFILE            output file
--speed {slow,fast}   search speed
The following session shows how data shows up in the program. Carefully observe the
output of the print() statements.
bash % python3 search.py foo.txt bar.txt
usage: search.py [-h] -p pattern [-v] [-o OUTFILE] [--speed {fast,slow}]
[filename [filename ...]]
search.py: error: the following arguments are required: -p/--pat
bash % python3 search.py -v -p spam --pat=eggs foo.txt bar.txt
filenames = ['foo.txt', 'bar.txt']
patterns  = ['spam', 'eggs']
verbose   = True
outfile   = None
speed     = slow
bash % python3 search.py -v -p spam --pat=eggs foo.txt bar.txt -o results
filenames = ['foo.txt', 'bar.txt']
patterns  = ['spam', 'eggs']
verbose   = True
outfile   = results
speed     = slow
bash % python3 search.py -v -p spam --pat=eggs foo.txt bar.txt -o results \
--speed=fast
filenames = ['foo.txt', 'bar.txt']
patterns  = ['spam', 'eggs']
verbose   = True
outfile   = results
speed     = fast
542  |  Chapter 13: Utility Scripting and System Administration
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested