c# pdf to tiff converter : Add a signature to a pdf file application SDK utility azure wpf asp.net visual studio pcb359-part453

These two parts of unit testing are separate from each other. The unittest.TestLoad
er instance created in the solution is used to assemble a test suite. The loadTestsFrom
Module() is one of several methods it defines to gather tests. In this case, it scans a
module for TestCase classes and extracts test methods from them. If you want some‐
thing more fine-grained, the loadTestsFromTestCase() method (not shown) can be
used to pull test methods from an individual class that inherits from TestCase.
The TextTestRunner class is an example of a test runner class. The main purpose of
this class is to execute the tests contained in a test suite. This class is the same test runner
that sits behind the unittest.main() function. However, here we’re giving it a bit of
low-level configuration, including an output file and an elevated verbosity level.
Although this recipe only consists of a few lines of code, it gives a hint as to how you
might further customize the unittest framework. To customize how test suites are
assembled, you would perform various operations using the TestLoader class. To cus‐
tomize how tests execute, you could make custom test runner classes that emulate the
functionality of TextTestRunner. Both topics are beyond the scope of what can be cov‐
ered here. However, documentation for the unittest module has extensive coverage
of the underlying protocols. 
14.5. Skipping or Anticipating Test Failures
Problem
You want to skip or mark selected tests as an anticipated failure in your unit tests.
Solution
The unittest module has decorators that can be applied to selected test methods to
control their handling. For example:
import unittest
import os
import platform
class Tests(unittest.TestCase):
def test_0(self):
self.assertTrue(True)
@unittest.skip('skipped test')
def test_1(self):
self.fail('should have failed!')
@unittest.skipIf(os.name=='posix''Not supported on Unix')
def test_2(self):
import winreg
14.5. Skipping or Anticipating Test Failures  |  573
Add a signature to a pdf file - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
add signature pdf online; adding signature to pdf file
Add a signature to a pdf file - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
adding a signature to a pdf document; adding a signature to a pdf form
@unittest.skipUnless(platform.system() == 'Darwin''Mac specific test')
def test_3(self):
self.assertTrue(True)
@unittest.expectedFailure
def test_4(self):
self.assertEqual(2+25)
if __name__ == '__main__':
unittest.main()
If you run this code on a Mac, you’ll get this output:
bash % python3 testsample.py -v
test_0 (__main__.Tests) ... ok
test_1 (__main__.Tests) ... skipped 'skipped test'
test_2 (__main__.Tests) ... skipped 'Not supported on Unix'
test_3 (__main__.Tests) ... ok
test_4 (__main__.Tests) ... expected failure
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 5 tests in 0.002s
OK (skipped=2, expected failures=1)
Discussion
The skip() decorator can be used to skip over a test that you don’t want to run at all.
skipIf() and skipUnless() can be a useful way to write tests that only apply to certain
platforms or Python versions, or which have other dependencies. Use the @expected
Failure decorator to mark tests that are known failures, but for which you don’t want
the test framework to report more information.
The decorators for skipping methods can also be applied to entire testing classes. For
example:
@unittest.skipUnless(platform.system() == 'Darwin''Mac specific tests')
class DarwinTests(unittest.TestCase):
...
14.6. Handling Multiple Exceptions
Problem
You have a piece of code that can throw any of several different exceptions, and you
need to account for all of the potential exceptions that could be raised without creating
duplicate code or long, meandering code passages.
574  |  Chapter 14: Testing, Debugging, and Exceptions
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
things. Add a signature or an empty signature field in any PDF file page. Search unsigned signature field in PDF document. Prepare
add signature to preview pdf; click to sign pdf
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
things. Add a signature or an empty signature field in any PDF file page. Search unsigned signature field in PDF document. Prepare
pdf signature field; add signature to pdf acrobat reader
Solution
If you can handle different exceptions all using a single block of code, they can be
grouped together in a tuple like this:
try:
client_obj.get_url(url)
except (URLErrorValueErrorSocketTimeout):
client_obj.remove_url(url)
In the preceding example, the remove_url() method will be called if any one of the
listed exceptions occurs. If, on the other hand, you need to handle one of the exceptions
differently, put it into its own except clause:
try:
client_obj.get_url(url)
except (URLErrorValueError):
client_obj.remove_url(url)
except SocketTimeout:
client_obj.handle_url_timeout(url)
Many exceptions are grouped into an inheritance hierarchy. For such exceptions, you
can catch all of them by simply specifying a base class. For example, instead of writing
code like this:
try:
f = open(filename)
except (FileNotFoundErrorPermissionError):
...
you could rewrite the except statement as:
try:
f = open(filename)
except OSError:
...
This works because OSError is a base class that’s common to both the FileNotFound
Errorand PermissionError exceptions.
Discussion
Although it’s not specific to handling multiple exceptions per se, it’s worth noting that
you can get a handle to the thrown exception using the as keyword:
try:
f = open(filename)
except OSError as e:
if e.errno == errno.ENOENT:
logger.error('File not found')
elif e.errno == errno.EACCES:
logger.error('Permission denied')
14.6. Handling Multiple Exceptions  |  575
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF
sign pdf online; pdf create signature
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. To be specific, you can edit PDF password and digital signature, and set PDF file permission
export pdf to word sign in; adding signature to pdf in preview
else:
logger.error('Unexpected error: %d'e.errno)
In this example, the e variable holds an instance of the raised OSError. This is useful if
you need to inspect the exception further, such as processing it based on the value of an
additional status code.
Be aware that except clauses are checked in the order listed and that the first match
executes. It may be a bit pathological, but you can easily create situations where multiple
except clauses might match. For example:
>>> f = open('missing')
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
FileNotFoundError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory'missing'
>>> try:
...     f = open('missing')
... except OSError:
...     print('It failed')
... except FileNotFoundError:
...     print('File not found')
...
It failed
>>>
Here the except FileNotFoundError clause doesn’t execute because the OSError is
more general, matches the FileNotFoundError exception, and was listed first.
As a debugging tip, if you’re not entirely sure about the class hierarchy of a particular
exception, you can quickly view it by inspecting the exception’s __mro__ attribute. For
example:
>>> FileNotFoundError.__mro__
(<class 'FileNotFoundError'>, <class 'OSError'>, <class 'Exception'>,
<class 'BaseException'>, <class 'object'>)
>>>
Any one of the listed classes up to BaseException can be used with the except statement.
14.7. Catching All Exceptions
Problem
You want to write code that catches all exceptions.
Solution
To catch all exceptions, write an exception handler for Exception, as shown here:
576  |  Chapter 14: Testing, Debugging, and Exceptions
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. To be specific, you can edit PDF password and digital signature, and set PDF file
adding signature to pdf form; create signature pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images.
pdf sign in; adding signature to pdf
try:
...
except Exception as e:
...
log('Reason:'e      # Important!
This will catch all exceptions save SystemExitKeyboardInterrupt, and GeneratorEx
it. If you also want to catch those exceptions, change Exception to BaseException.
Discussion
Catching all exceptions is sometimes used as a crutch by programmers who can’t re‐
member all of the possible exceptions that might occur in complicated operations. As
such, it is also a very good way to write undebuggable code if you are not careful.
Because of this, if you choose to catch all exceptions, it is absolutely critical to log or
report the actual reason for the exception somewhere (e.g., log file, error message print‐
ed to screen, etc.). If you don’t do this, your head will likely explode at some point.
Consider this example:
def parse_int(s):
try:
n = int(v)
except Exception:
print("Couldn't parse")
If you try this function, it behaves like this:
>>> parse_int('n/a')
Couldn't parse
>>> parse_int('42')
Couldn't parse
>>>
At this point, you might be left scratching your head as to why it doesn’t work. Now
suppose the function had been written like this:
def parse_int(s):
try:
n = int(v)
except Exception as e:
print("Couldn't parse")
print('Reason:'e)
In this case, you get the following output, which indicates that a programming mistake
has been made:
>>> parse_int('42')
Couldn't parse
Reason: global name 'v' is not defined
>>>
14.7. Catching All Exceptions  |  577
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
you can add some additional information to generated PDF file. What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on
add signature to pdf preview; adding a signature to a pdf file
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
freehand signature, text and date signature. If you need to add your own signatures such as logo to PDF document, you and load and save it to current PDF file.
pdf converter sign in; pdf signatures
All things being equal, it’s probably better to be as precise as possible in your exception
handling. However, if you must catch all exceptions, just make sure you give good di‐
agnostic information or propagate the exception so that cause doesn’t get lost.
14.8. Creating Custom Exceptions
Problem
You’re building an application and would like to wrap lower-level exceptions with cus‐
tom ones that have more meaning in the context of your application.
Solution
Creating new exceptions is easy—just define them as classes that inherit from Excep
tion (or one of the other existing exception types if it makes more sense). For example,
if you are writing code related to network programming, you might define some custom
exceptions like this:
class NetworkError(Exception):
pass
class HostnameError(NetworkError):
pass
class TimeoutError(NetworkError):
pass
class ProtocolError(NetworkError):
pass
Users could then use these exceptions in the normal way. For example:
try:
msg = s.recv()
except TimeoutError as e:
...
except ProtocolError as e:
...
Discussion
Custom exception classes should almost always inherit from the built-in Exception
class, or inherit from some locally defined base exception that itself inherits from Ex
ception. Although all exceptions also derive from BaseException, you should not use
this as a base class for new exceptions. BaseException is reserved for system-exiting
exceptions,  such as KeyboardInterrupt or SystemExit,  and  other  exceptions  that
should signal the application to exit. Therefore, catching these exceptions is not the
578  |  Chapter 14: Testing, Debugging, and Exceptions
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create Viewer for C# .NET Signatures supports add signatures to Word and remove signature from Word
adding signature to pdf document; add signature block to pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields; Create signatures in new fields which hold the signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit
pdf sign; add signature to pdf online
intended use case. Assuming you follow this convention, it follows that inheriting from
BaseException causes your custom exceptions to not be caught and to signal an im‐
minent application shutdown! 
Having custom exceptions in your application and using them as shown makes your
application code tell a more coherent story to whoever may need to read the code. One
design consideration involves the grouping of custom exceptions via inheritance. In
complicated applications, it may make sense to introduce further base classes that group
different classes of exceptions together. This gives the user a choice of catching a nar‐
rowly specified error, such as this:
try:
s.send(msg)
except ProtocolError:
...
It also gives the ability to catch a broad range of errors, such as the following:
try:
s.send(msg)
except NetworkError:
...
If you are going to define a new exception that overrides the __init__() method of
Exception, make sure you always call Exception.__init__() with all of the passed
arguments. For example:
class CustomError(Exception):
def __init__(selfmessagestatus):
super().__init__(messagestatus)
self.message = message
self.status = status
This might look a little weird, but the default behavior of Exception is to accept all
arguments passed and to store them in the .args attribute as a tuple. Various other
libraries and parts of Python expect all exceptions to have the .args attribute, so if you
skip this step, you might find that your new exception doesn’t behave quite right in
certain contexts. To illustrate the use of .args, consider this interactive session with the
built-in RuntimeError exception, and notice how any number of arguments can be used
with the raise statement:
>>> try:
...     raise RuntimeError('It failed')
... except RuntimeError as e:
...     print(e.args)
...
('It failed',)
>>> try:
...     raise RuntimeError('It failed'42'spam')
... except RuntimeError as e:
14.8. Creating Custom Exceptions  |  579
...     print(e.args)
...
('It failed', 42, 'spam')
>>>
For more information on creating your own exceptions, see the Python documentation .
14.9. Raising an Exception in Response to Another
Exception
Problem
You want to raise an exception in response to catching a different exception, but want
to include information about both exceptions in the traceback.
Solution
To chain exceptions, use the raise from statement instead of a simple raise statement.
This will give you information about both errors. For example:
>>> def example():
...     try:
...             int('N/A')
...     except ValueError as e:
...             raise RuntimeError('A parsing error occurred'from e...
>>> 
example()
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 3, in example
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10'N/A'
The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception:
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "<stdin>", line 5, in example
RuntimeErrorA parsing error occurred
>>>
As you can see in the traceback, both exceptions are captured. To catch such an excep‐
tion, you would use a normal except statement. However, you can look at the __cause__
attribute of the exception object to follow the exception chain should you wish. For
example:
try:
example()
except RuntimeError as e:
print("It didn't work:"e)
580  |  Chapter 14: Testing, Debugging, and Exceptions
if e.__cause__:
print('Cause:'e.__cause__)
An implicit form of chained exceptions occurs when another exception gets raised in‐
side an except block. For example:
>>> def example2():
...     try:
...             int('N/A')
...     except ValueError as e:
...             print("Couldn't parse:"err)
...
>>>
>>> example2()
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 3, in example2
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10'N/A'
During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "<stdin>", line 5, in example2
NameErrorglobal name 'err' is not defined
>>>
In this example, you get information about both exceptions, but the interpretation is a
bit different. In this case, the NameError exception is raised as the result of a program‐
ming error, not in direct response to the parsing error. For this case, the __cause__
attribute of an exception is not set. Instead, a __context__ attribute is set to the prior
exception.
If, for some reason, you want to suppress chaining, use raise from None:
>>> def example3():
...     try:
...             int('N/A')
...     except ValueError:
...             raise RuntimeError('A parsing error occurred'from None...
>>> 
example3()
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "<stdin>", line 5, in example3
RuntimeErrorA parsing error occurred
>>>
14.9. Raising an Exception in Response to Another Exception  |  581
Discussion
In designing code, you should give careful attention to use of the raise statement inside
of  other except blocks.  In  most  cases,  such raise statements  should probably  be
changed to raise from statements. That is, you should prefer this style:
try:
...
except SomeException as e:
raise DifferentException() from e
The reason for doing this is that you are explicitly chaining the causes together. That is,
the DifferentException is being raised in  direct response to  getting a SomeExcep
tion. This relationship will be explicitly stated in the resulting traceback.
If you write your code in the following style, you still get a chained exception, but it’s
often not clear if the exception chain was intentional or the result of an unforeseen
programming error:
try:
...
except SomeException:
raise DifferentException()
When you use raise from, you’re making it clear that you meant to raise the second
exception.
Resist the urge to suppress exception information, as shown in the last example. Al‐
though suppressing exception information can lead to smaller tracebacks, it also dis‐
cards information that might be useful for debugging. All things being equal, it’s often
best to keep as much information as possible.
14.10. Reraising the Last Exception
Problem
You caught an exception in an except block, but now you want to reraise it.
Solution
Simply use the raise statement all by itself. For example:
>>> def example():
...     try:
...             int('N/A')
...     except ValueError:
...             print("Didn't work")
...             raise
...
582  |  Chapter 14: Testing, Debugging, and Exceptions
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested