c# convert pdf to tiff itextsharp : Add text boxes to a pdf control application system azure web page .net console vb_net33-part1620

Chapter Twenty Four – SQL Server 
Visual Basic .NET 
331
When you close the programme down and then reopen it, however, the record will be back 
again! 
This is because you’re not doing anything to the underlying database – DataTables and Datasets 
are disconnected from the database. So we need to write some code to reconnect, and then 
update. 
Add a button to your form. Change the Name property to btnUpdate. Change the Text property 
to Update Changes. Double click your button to open up its code stub. 
The button, then, needs to do two things: issue the Update command against the underlying 
database, and refresh the connection.  
Add the following two lines to your button code: 
data_adapter.Update( CType(binding_source.DataSource, DataTable) ) 
Get_DGV_Data( data_adapter.SelectCommand.CommandText ) 
The first line is the one that updates the database. Its done simply by typing the word Update 
after the name of your Data Adapter. In between the round brackets, though, you have to tell it 
what it is you’re updating. Because we have a binding source object, we have to specify the 
DataSource property: 
binding_source.DataSource 
However, the Data Adapter doesn’t know what to do with this, so you have to convert it to a 
Type that it does understand – a DataTable: 
CType(  binding_source.DataSource, DataTable  ) 
The CType part means “Convert to Type”. In between the round brackets, you add what it is 
you’re trying to convert. After a comma, you add the Type you want to convert to, a DataTable 
for us. So we’re saying, “Convert the DataSource of the BindingSource object to a DataTable”. 
The second line calls our Get_DGV_Data( ) Sub again. Notice how we’re getting the SQL 
command, though: 
data_adapter.SelectCommand.CommandText 
So the Data Adapter has a SelectCommand property. This in turn has a CommandText 
property. The CommandText is a SQL Command, and it already knows what to do – get all the 
records from the database again. 
Run your programme and try it out. You should now be able to add records, close the 
programme down, and still see them there. You should also be able to delete a row. When you 
click your Update Changes button, the row will be deleted from the database as well as the Data 
Table. 
Add text boxes to a pdf - C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Draw, Add and Edit Various Annotations on PDF File in C# Programming
add textbox to pdf reader; add text pdf file acrobat
Add text boxes to a pdf - VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Guide to Draw, Add and Edit Various Annotations on PDF File in VB.NET Programming
add text to pdf without acrobat; adding text to pdf in reader
Chapter Twenty Four – SQL Server 
Visual Basic .NET 
332
Get Cell Data from A DataGridView 
Another thing you can do with programming code is to get the values of all the cells from a  
selected row. You could then pass these values on to a second form for further processing, or 
just display that person’s details on a label or in a text box. Let’s see how to do that. 
Add another button to your form. Change the Name to btnSelected, and the Text to Get 
Selected Row. Double click the button to get at the code. 
We need to set up some variables for this to work. So add the following to your button code: 
Dim rowCount As Integer 
Dim i As Integer 
Now add the following line: 
rowCount = DataGridView1.CurrentRow.Cells.Count 
What we’re going to do is to loop round all the cells in the row we have selected, and get each 
value. So we need to know how many cells there are. Quite handily, there’s a property of 
DataGridViews that allows you to get the Current Row, and count how many cells it has. 
Which is what the above line does.  
Now add the following For loop: 
For i = 0 To rowCount – 1 
MsgBox(  DataGridView1.CurrentRow.Cells(i).Value  ) 
Next 
So we’re going from 0 to the RowCount, minus 1. The code for the loop then uses the loop 
counter to access the values at these positions in the Row: 
DataGridView1.CurrentRow.Cells(i).Value   
Run your programme and test it out. Select an entire row by clicking in the Row header (circled 
in red in a previous image). This selects the entire row. Now click your “Get Selected Row” 
button. You should see something like this: 
VB.NET Image: Professional Form Processing and Recognition SDK in
reading (OMR) helpful for check/mark sense boxes and intelligent The form format and annotation text can all be your forms before using form printing add-on.
add stamp to pdf; adding comments to pdf file
.NET JPEG 2000 SDK | Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images
Available as an add-on for RaterEdge .NET Imaging SDK; Support for any 32 Support metadata encoding and decoding, including IPTC, XMP, XML Box, UUID Boxes, etc.
adding text box to pdf; add comments pdf document
Chapter Twenty Four – SQL Server 
Visual Basic .NET 
333
To finish off this section, try these exercises. 
Exercise 
Build up a string in your For loop, so that the message box displays the following: 
Make sure you miss the ID cell out! 
Exercise 
Return to Design View. Click on your DataGridView control. Have a look at the properties area 
on the right, and explore the long list of properties available to the control. In particular, have a 
look at these properties: 
AlternatingRowsDefaultCellStyle 
AutoSizeColumnsMode 
CellBorderStyle 
Default Cell Size 
Try to design a form like ours below: 
Chapter Twenty Four – SQL Server 
Visual Basic .NET 
334
Notice that we’ve made the Column headers bold, centred everything, and had alternate colours 
for each row. 
But we’ll leave DataGrids there, and move on. Explore them further, though – they are quite 
handy for displaying data! 
Chapter Twenty Five – Picture Viewer 
Visual Basic .NET 
335
Picture Viewer – A Project 
In this section, you’ll create your very own Picture Viewer. It will look like this: 
Down the left hand side, we have a ListView control. This allows us to display thumbnails of 
our chosen images. When you click an image in the ListView, the full size image appears on 
the right. If the image is too big for the form, scroll bars will appear. Our programme also has 
rudimentary zoom ability. When you right click the big image, the picture becomes smaller. 
When you left click the image, it will become bigger. You’ll learn to use the following controls: 
ListView 
ImageList 
Panels 
Picture Box 
Open File Dialogue Box 
Let’s make a start. 
Chapter Twenty Five – Picture Viewer 
Visual Basic .NET 
336
Adding the Controls to the Form 
Start a new project. Make your Form nice and big. We made ours 950 wide by 800 high. Add a 
Panel control to the form. This can be found in the toolbox, in the Containers section: 
Draw the Panel any size you like. When you do, you’ll see that it has a Move icon: 
With the Panel selected, set the following properties for it: 
Location:  
160, 10 
Size:    
750, 720 
Anchor:  
Top, Bottom, Left, Right 
AutoScroll:  
True 
The Panel will hold a PictureBox control. The reason we’re adding a Panel is because the 
PictureBox doesn’t have scrollbars of its own. We can dock a PictureBox to a Panel. When you 
make the PictureBox’s image bigger than the Panel, the Panel will add the scrollbars 
automatically. 
So add a PictureBox to your Panel. (The PictureBox is under the Common category in the 
Toolbox.) Just click the PictureBox once. Now draws out a PictureBox to fill your Panel. 
Chapter Twenty Five – Picture Viewer 
Visual Basic .NET 
337
Set the following Properties for your PictureBox: 
Dock:    
Top 
SizeMode:  
AutoSize 
Your Picture Box should now be entirely inside of your Panel, right up to the edges. 
Now add a button to your Form. Change the Name property to btnLoadImages, and set the 
Text to Load Images. Position the button somewhere in the top left of the form. 
Just below the button, you can add a Label with the Text property of Images. 
Add a ListView control to your form. The ListView is also under the Common category in the 
Toolbox. Resize your ListView control, and place it under your button and Label. (We made 
our Size 120, 300.) Leave the other properties on their defaults. 
The next thing to add is a OpenFileDialog control. This can be found under the Dialog 
category of the Toolbox. Simply double click to add one to your project. You’ll see it appear at 
the bottom of the project window: 
With the OpenFileDialog control selected, have a look at the Properties area on the right. Set 
the Name property to oFD1, and the MultiSelect property to True. 
Finally, add an ImageList control. This can be found under the Components category of the 
Toolbox: 
Chapter Twenty Five – Picture Viewer 
Visual Basic .NET 
338
Double click ImageList to add one to your project. Again, it will get added to the bottom of the 
project Window: 
With your ImageList1 control selected, set its ImageSize property to 32, 32. The ImageList 
control, as its name suggests, holds a list of images. We’ll use these images as the thumbnail 
images for the ListView. 
Now that we have all our controls in place, we can start the coding. 
Selecting Images 
The first we’ll do is to launch the Open File Dialogue box. You’ve done this before, in a 
previous section. 
Chapter Twenty Five – Picture Viewer 
Visual Basic .NET 
339
Double click your button to get at the code stub. The first two lines of code to add will clear the 
ImageList of its images, and clear the ListView. Add these two lines, then: 
ImageList1.Images.Clear( ) 
ListView1.Clear( ) 
So we’re just issuing the Clear command of the two objects. 
To get the Open File Dialogue box to appear, add these lines: 
oFD1.InitialDirectory = "C:\" 
oFD1.Title = "Open an Image File" 
oFD1.Filter = "JPEGS|*.jpg|GIFS|*.gif" 
Dim ofdResults As Integer = oFD1.ShowDialog( ) 
If ofdResults = Windows.Forms.DialogResult.Cancel Then 
Exit Sub 
End If 
You should know what these lines do by now, as you’ve met them before. But we’re just 
setting the initial directory, adding a title to the dialogue box, and then specifying the type of 
files than can be opened. We have to handle the Cancel button being clicked, which is what the 
rest of the lines do. 
You can try it out, if you like. The dialogue box should appear when you click your button, and 
you should be able to select more than one file.  
As you learned earlier, though, the Open File Dialogue box doesn’t actually open files. It just 
allows you to specify the names of the files you want to open. 
Because you want the user to be able to load more than one file into the ListView area, you 
have to get at all the file names selected. This can be done with a For … Each Loop. Add the 
following lines to the ones you already have: 
Try 
Dim single_file As String 
For Each single_file In oFD1.FileNames 
MsgBox(  single_file  ) 
Next 
Catch ex As Exception 
MsgBox("Error opening files") 
End Try 
Chapter Twenty Five – Picture Viewer 
Visual Basic .NET 
340
We’ve put it in a Try … Catch block, to trap any errors. The first line sets up a string variable 
that we’ve called single_file. The For … Each loop is this: 
For Each single_file In oFD1.FileNames 
MsgBox(  single_file  ) 
Next 
So the OpenFileDialog control has a property called FileNames. This gets you a list of all the 
files that the user selected. By using For … Each you can loop round and get all the file names 
(which will include the file paths). The file names will be stored in the single_file  variable. 
Try your programme out again. Click your button, and select a few images on your computer. 
When you click the Open button, you should see the Message Box display, with all your file 
names and file paths displayed. 
We need all those file names and file paths. We can then pass them to the ImageList control, for 
the thumbnails. But we’ll also need them for the ListView control. To store the file names and 
file paths, we can use an array. Add the following to your Try … Catch block, just under “Dim 
single_file As String”: 
Dim num_of_files As Integer = oFD1.FileNames.Length 
Dim aryFilePaths(num_of_files - 1) As String 
The Length property of FileNames gets you how many files were selected. In between the 
round brackets of aryFilePaths, we’re using this number to set the size of the array. We’re 
deducting 1 because arrays start at zero. 
Add this third variable, just below the two above: 
Dim counter As Integer = 0 
We can use the counter to access the array. In place of your Message Box, add this line to your 
For … Each loop code: 
aryFilePaths( counter ) = single_file 
So the file names and paths will now be stored in the array we set up. Increment the counter on 
the line just below this one: 
counter = counter + 1 
Your code should now look like this, though: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested