convert pdf to word programmatically in c# : Annotate pdf in browser application SDK utility html wpf asp.net visual studio Carbon%20Finance%20-%20The%20Financial%20Implications%20of%20Climate%20Change8-part1745

60
CARBON FINANCE
efficiencies and the fuel mix of generation. From an efficiency perspective,
thermalplants in Europe are10 to 25 percentmoreefficient,onaverage,than
their U.S. counterparts (PricewaterhouseCoopers and Enerpresse 2002).
Looking at the fuel mix used in the EUand the United States, coal-based
generation exceeds 50 percent of U.S. output, whereas the EU has reduced
its use of coal to approximately 35 percent. The balance of the difference
is due to the use of nuclear (20 percent in the United States, 33 percent
in Europe). In comparing similar figures for the EU and Japan, coal and
nuclear play a greater role in the Japanese power sector, compared to the
greater use of hydro and gas in Europe (PricewaterhouseCoopers 2003).
There is a need, however, to reconcile the growing demand for afford-
able and reliable electricity supplies with the necessity to reduce greenhouse
gas (GHG) emissions. A number of options exist to address this imbalance.
In the near term, fuel switching and increased efficiency of production
can contribute to emission reductions. Government actions aimed at con-
trolling GHGs from large final emitters are anticipated to accelerate the
shift in resource use from coal to gas as the primary fuel used in power
plants (Ling et al. 2004). Based on carbon prices of about ¤25 per metric
ton CO
2
within Europe, some forecasts predict that investments in new gas
plants and writing off obsolete coal plants would be more than covered by
increased operating profits arising from a predicted 40 percent rise in the
wholesale price of electricity (Leyva and Lekander 2005). Others anticipate
that a coal-to-gas transition would not take place before carbon prices
reached ¤60/metric ton CO
2
(Citigroup 2005).
In the longer term, a gradual deployment of lower-carbon technolo-
gies and the expansion of renewable technologies, such as biomass, will
contribute to improved carbon profiles for many utilities. Demand-side
management also has a role to play in reducing the amount of electric-
ity used. Table 3.2 summarizes the different points of entry (generation,
grid, end user) and timing of where changes can be made to the energy
industry (Morgan, Apt, and Lave 2005).
Most recently, two of these technologies, integrated gasification com-
bined cycle (IGCC) and carbon capture and storage (CCS) have gained
increased profiles in climate policyagendas within the European Union emis-
sions trading scheme (EU ETS) and the Kyoto Protocol’s clean development
mechanism (CDM).
The rapid economic growth that exists today in India and China is
closely linked to an equally increasing demand for generating capacity
and electricity. The greatest potential for large-scale cuts in CO
2
emissions
when coal is used is likely to come from a range of advanced technologies,
including CSS combined with IGCC. In an IGCC system, coal being used to
produce electric power is reformed, using steam, into a synthetic gas, which
Annotate pdf in browser - C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C#.NET Tutorial for How to Add a Sticky Note Annotation to PDF Page
pdf annotation tool; add comments to pdf in reader
Annotate pdf in browser - VB.NET PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online VB.NET Tutorial for Adding a Sticky Note Annotation to PDF Page
add comments to pdf file; adding comments to pdf file
R
e
g
u
l
a
t
e
d
a
n
d
E
n
e
r
g
y
-
I
n
t
e
n
s
i
v
e
S
e
c
t
o
r
s
61
can be easily separated into a concentrated stream of CO
2
and gaseous
hydrogen. The hydrogen provides a clean, carbon-free fuel for combustion,
distributed generation applications, or as a fuel for automobiles. The CO
2
is sequestered by pumping it underground. CSS involves the capture of flue
gases exiting the combustion chamber of large point sources, the stripping
of CO
2
from the gases and its subsequent storage in an underground
geological reservoir. CO
2
can be captured from sources including power
stations, natural gas processing facilities, and steel and cement plants. This
combination of IGCC and CCS can deliver power plant efficiencies in the
region of 50 percent, with only 3 to 4 percent energy penalty for CO
2
capture and handling.
In the CCS process, CO
2
can be stored in geological reservoirs that are
more than 800 meters below ground level,in depleted oiland gas reservoirs,
deep saline formations both on and offshore, and can be used in enhanced
oil recovery (EOR) and coal-bed methane retrieval processes. The oil and
gas industry can offer a wealth of knowledge and experience both in storage
of CO
2
in depleted oil and gas fields and in the well-established use of CO
2
for EOR. The capture and transport of carbon, in itself, requires energy and
creates emissions, but net CO
2
emissions are estimated to be cut to just 10
to 20 percent of a plant that does not use CCS. The electricity industry is
anticipated to be one of the greater users of carbon capture and storage.
(See Box 3.1.)
BOX 3.1 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE
(CSS) PILOT PROJECT BY VATTENFALL
The Swedish power company, Vattenfall, has taken the first step
toward developing a commercial CCS system for carbon-free power
generation based on coal. The institution is building the world’s first
30MW thermal pilot plant for CO
2
capture near its lignite-fired power
plant in Swartze Pumpe in Germany. It is scheduled for completion
by 2008.
Among the different technologies that exist for CO
2
capture, Vat-
tenfall has chosen an ‘‘oxyfuel’’ combustion system,wherein oxygen is
mixed with recycled flue gas containing CO
2
,and then used for com-
bustion,resulting in aflue gas that contains onlywater and CO
2
.Their
CO
2
will be stored in subsurface geological sites, such as depleted oil
and gas fields.
Source: Str¨omberg, von Gyllenpalm, and G¨ortz 2005.
C#: How to Determine the Display Format for Web Doucment Viewing
C#, C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF C# HTML5 Viewer: Choose File Display Mode on Web Browser. document viewer for .NET can convert PDF, Word, Excel
annotate pdf online; annotate pdf files on ipad
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer, Create Web Doc & Image Viewer in C#.NET
technical end users to view, process, edit and annotate documents & C# Demo Codes for PDF Conversions. 2. Choose file display mode for viewing on web browser.
android app to annotate pdf; pdf comments
TABLE 3.2
Summary of Availability of New Technologies Affecting the Electricity Industry
Generation Technologies
Technology
Impacts
Limitations
Availability
Integratedgas combined cycle
turbines (IGCC)
Reduce CO
2
emissions; higher
conversion efficiency; well
suited to meet intermediate
and peak demands
Gas price and supply
uncertainty; still emits some
CO
2
Now
Nuclear Power
No direct CO
2
emissions
High cost, public perception,
spent fuel, security
Now
Biomass
Large CO
2
reduction
Cost of collection; aesthetics;
technical limits to % that can
be co-fired with coal
10 years
Wind Power
Most competitive renewable
energy option; recent
growth driven by incentives
(taxes, credits) and
renewable portfolio
standards
Land availability; aesthetics;
high cost of storage
10 years
Solar Photovoltaic (PV) power
High % of CO
2
reduction
Intermittent; conversion is both
expensive and inefficient
25 years
Hydrogen (used in fuel cells)
Potentially large CO
2
reduction from electric
power
Hydrolysisof water is costly;
natural gas (HC
4
), coal
gasification the most likely
sources
40 years
6
2
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF to HTML conversion library can eliminate the crashing issue of web browser when it is trying to display a PDF document file inside a browser window.
annotate pdf online google docs; annotate pdf google docs
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
and owns strong compatibility with most modern web browser environments We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
android app annotate pdf; annotate pdf google chrome
Distributed Generation1
Internal combustion engines
(ICE)
Use of natural gas reduces
CO
2
emissions; use of
CHP3; increases end-use
efficiency
Many current regulations limit
distributed generation and
micro-grids
Now
Micro-turbines
Use of natural gas reduces
CO
2
emissions; use of CHP
increases end-use efficiency
Many current regulations limit
distributed generation and
micro-grids
15 years
Grid Technologies
Advanced flow control systems
Improved system efficiency
and reliability
Market learning needed tobring
costs down
5years
Superconducting material
Reduced line losses
Greater control over power
flow
Energy Efficient End-Use Devices and Advanced Load Control
Energy-efficient end-use
devices and advanced load
control
Reduce energy consumption
Mainly behavioral and
institutional
Now
More efficient end-use
appliances
1Distributedgenerationisagenerictermforsmallscaleelectricityproductiontechnologythatcanbelocatednearthepointof
end-use.
Source: Adapted from Morgan, G., J. Apt, and L. Lave. 2005. The U.S. Electric Power Sector and Climate Change Mitigation.
Pew Center on Global Climate Change, Arlington, VA.
6
3
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
edited), is less searchable for search engines. The other is the crashing problem when user is visiting the PDF file using web browser.
annotate pdf ipad app; android pdf annotation tablet
VB.NET TIFF: .NET Web TIFF Viewer SDK; How to View & Process TIFF
owns multi-functions for developers to view, annotate, process, print also used to view & read PDF file in TIFF image file while displaying within web browser?
annotate pdf ipad; adding comments to pdf in reader
64
CARBON FINANCE
TABLE 3.3
Current Large-scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Projects
Country
Project
Reservoir Type
CO
2
Source
Date Started
Norway (offshore) Sleipner
Saline Formation Gas processing
1996
Canada
Weyburne EOR
Coal gasification
2000
Algeria
In Salah
Gas field
Gas processing
2004
Source: Kessels, J., and H. de Coninck. 2006. Going underground. Environmental
Finance 7(7):S41.
Reflecting the growing importance of CCS technology, a U.K.-based
Carbon Capture and Storage Association (CCSA) was officially launched in
March 2006, with most of its members being in the energy sector. Its goal
is to promote technology that can store CO
2
permanently underground and
to investigate incentives that would encourage such development. CCSA
envisages working with the U.K. government to resolve any regulatory
issues that may cause delays in the deployment of such new technology
(www.ccsassociation.org).
Three major geological CO
2
storage projects are already in operation
(Table 3.3). Each has the annual capacity to store approximately 1 million
tons of CO
2.
Other companies, such as Shell and Statoil, have plans to
capture CO
2
in a new power plant in Norway and use up to 2.5 million
metric tons per year of the CO
2
for EOR in offshore fields near Norway.
Two similar projects are proposed byBP in Scotland and California (Kessels
and de Coninck 2006).
CCShas gained recent prominence, with the EUETSand CDMsoffering
potential financial incentives for companies to implement more CCS power
stations. Within the Kyoto Protocol framework, the application of CCS
offers a great potential for carbon credit projects in China and India,
as well as the possibility of developing markets for the export of clean
coal technologies (Cook and Zakkour 2005). However, the two projects
that have been submitted to be eligible under the CDM have provoked
considerable debate.
At present, CCS technology is expensive, but further research and
development could bring the costs down considerably. The EU ETS has set
an incentive for the introduction of CCS on a large, commercial scale, but
the economic viability of CCS will depend to a great extent on the price at
which CO
2
allowances are traded. A recent report by the Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2005a) suggests that the use of such
technology would only be economic when CO
2
prices rise above $25 to $30
per metric ton. If technological costs remain high, new CCS technologies
are not likely to be introduced commercially.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
Support to view PDF document online in browser such as firefox, chrome, safari A powerful PDF reader allows C# users to view PDF, annotate PDF file, create PDF
adding notes to pdf; pdf print comments
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to HTML in C#.NET
This C#.NET PowerPoint to HTML conversion library can eliminate the crashing issue of web browser when it is trying to display a PowerPoint document file
annotate ipad pdf; adding annotations to pdf
R
e
g
u
l
a
t
e
d
a
n
d
E
n
e
r
g
y
-
I
n
t
e
n
s
i
v
e
S
e
c
t
o
r
s
65
Afurther major challenge of making CCS commercially viable is the
development of a legal framework for CO
2
storage. At present, there are
no regulations relating specifically to long-term responsibility for storage,
although someglobal and regional environmentaltreaties on climate change
and the marine environment may be relevant to the permissibility of CO
2
storage (IPCC 2005a).
INTEGRATED OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY
At present, the oil and gas sector is undergoingprofound structural changes.
The globalization of the gas industry, the rise of new emerging market play-
ers, and the worldwide reach of investors’ involvement have all contributed
to the creation of a more competitive and complicated industry. At the
same time, companies within this sector are major emitters of GHGs, and
as such are facing a number of challenges related to climate change risks.
The industry is vulnerable to:
Government mandates in areas such as gas flaring and facility abandon-
ment.
The direct impacts of adverse weather brought on by climate change
(see Chapter 4).
The shift away from oil toward natural gas in recent years, as natural
gas is viewed as a cleaner fuel from a climate change perspective.
The political and legal risks that confront companies within the sector
as they seek new sources of reserves.
The major challenges in these areas are outlined below.
Government Mandates
Gas flaring: Gas flaringis known to have a negative impact with respect
to global warming and climate change. Nigeria and Angola, alone,
account for approximately 15 percent of global gas flaring activity.
To address this worldwide concern, West African governments have
agreed to cease flaring activities in 2008. The rise in the global liquefied
natural gas (LNG) industry has, however, allowed for an economically
beneficial transition from flaring to exportation of LNG.
Facility abandonment: The looming liability of decommissioning
mature sites is expected to be significant as regulations governing the
abandonment of facilities such as drilling platforms in the North Sea
come into effect. However, such concerns have stimulated the industry
to look at alternative uses for the platforms, such as offshore wind and
wave power generation facilities (Ling et al. 2004).
C# Word - Convert Word to HTML in C#.NET
VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB can eliminate the crashing issue of web browser when it
adding notes to a pdf; annotate pdf files
C# Image: Operate Document Image File in Web Viewer Using C#.NET
displayed in the area this.REWebViewer1.LoadFile("/RasterEdge_Demo_Docs/Sample.pdf", this.SessionId How to Save Document File from Web Browser in C#.NET.
adding notes to pdf files; add annotations to pdf
66
CARBON FINANCE
Physical Capital
Volatile global weather conditions that are often associated with climate
change have increasingly been found to interrupt activities in major oil and
gas production in such areas as the Gulf of Mexico. The 2002 and 2004
hurricane seasons resulted in substantial losses of oil and gas production
in this region. Then in 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita wrought both
physical loss and economic damage to the oil industry in theGulf of Mexico,
damaging oil rigs, temporarily knocking out 95 percent of its oil refining
capacity and 88 percent of its natural gas production, and causingsomepro-
duction and refining capacity to be completely shut down (Laidlaw 2005).
Indeed, the devastation is considered to be the world’s first ‘‘integrated
energy shock,’’ which disrupted the flows of oil, natural gas, and electric
power simultaneously (Yergin 2006).
Restricted Access to Oil and Gas Reserves
The oil and gas industry is also facing growing challenges in its attempts to
gain access to new reserves. Politicaland legalrisks have created uncertainty
in the Middle East and in many potential new sources, such as Russia and
Nigeria. In addition, increased energy prices have produced a resurgence of
nationalist policies in oil-producing countries, with a return to a 1970s style
of ‘‘resource nationalism.’’ Writing in the journal Foreign Policy, Thomas
Friedman (2006) describes this inverse relationship between the price of oil
and the pace of freedom as ‘‘the First Law of Petropolitics,’’ wherein the
price of oil and the tempo of democratic reform always move in opposite
directions in oil-rich states. This power shift has been observed recently in
various forms:
The Bolivian and Russian governments have taken outright control of
oil and gas fields.
Nigeria and Kazakhstan give highly preferential treatment to state
companies over foreign installations.
Ecuador seized the assets of Occidental Petroleum Corporation in May
2006 and raised taxes on oil companies to 50 percent when prices go
above the levels stipulated in contracts.
The Venezuelan government asserted its hold on 32 small oil fields
developed by foreign companies and increased taxes from 56.6 percent
to 83 percent.
There is concern that states, intent on taking over their oil industries,
often cut back on exploration and production by diverting their newfound
oil revenues to costly social, health, and education programs, as well as
R
e
g
u
l
a
t
e
d
a
n
d
E
n
e
r
g
y
-
I
n
t
e
n
s
i
v
e
S
e
c
t
o
r
s
67
other necessary reforms. Lack of reinvestment in the industry erodes both
exploration and production levels of the very resources that they are so
eager to exploit. This effect has already been seen in Venezuela, where the
government cut its oil export target for 2006 by 100,000 barrels a day.
In addition, these actions threaten to drive away foreign capital and
future private investments in the oil industry, precisely when they need
it most. Friedman (2006) expresses a further concern that such a swing
in Petropolitics could have far reaching implications for global stability.
Japan, for example, being the world’s third largest consumer of oil (after
China and the United States) is heavily reliant on oil imports. With nearly
90 percent of its imports coming from the Middle East, Japan’s sources
of supply becomes susceptible to Petropolitics, and may oblige Japan to
overlook the actions of petro-authoritarians, such as Iran and the latter’s
dedication to nuclear technology (Barta 2006).
Further constraints to development and production of oil and gas
reserves are found in the difficulty of reaching their sources in technically
remote regions such as the Arctic and Asia-Pacific.Goldman Sachs estimates
that over 70 percent of future energy assets will come from non-OECD
countries by2012,up from 21 percent in 1970 and 42 percent in 2002 (Ling
et al. 2004). Such projects will require not only traditional geological and
technical skills, but also the ability to work with diverse partners, national
oil companies, host governments, and nongovernmental organizations. This
has certainly been the experience of Niko Resources Ltd., a Canadian
company from Calgary, in its pursuit of gas reserves in Bangladesh. Niko
has been involved in price disputes with thehost government, and has had to
meet angry villagers’ demands for compensation for gases that were leaking
out in the marketplace. In the aftermath of a blowout, it suffered lawsuits, a
frozen bank account, verbal attacks by citizens, and daily denunciations by
the local media. Top executives at the company are quoted as saying that
it is of crucial importance to understand the political landscape
when investing in a foreign country—and never to assume it is
similar to Canada. (York 2006)
The oiland gas sector has encountered other challenges in gaining access
to resources as communities in remote regions oppose increased production
in their effort to protect pristine areas and fragile ecosystems. Past troubles
encountered by Texaco in Ecuador, and Shell in Nigeria, herald future
difficulties within the sector. Present-day constraints in this respect are seen
in the Arctic National Wildlife debate within the United States and the
Mackenzie River natural gas pipeline in Canada (Austin and Sauer 2002).
The transportation of oil and naturalgas by tankers is also experiencing
its own form of opposition. In Canada, Enbridge Inc.’s gateway pipeline
68
CARBON FINANCE
project is encountering resistance to the prospect of its ships (bulk-liquid car-
riers) traveling through narrow channels off the coast of British Columbia,in
order to export its oil sands crude to China (Ebner 2006). On the Canadian
east coast, there is concern about the planned siting of an LNG terminal on
the U.S. Passamquoddy tribal lands adjacent to Eastport, Maine. Proposals
for LNG plants have been considered and rejected in other locations on
the U.S. eastern seaboard because of their potential negative impacts on
tourism. Now, the citizens of New Brunswick, Canada, are distressed about
the choice of the St. Croix River as an LNG facility location, because of the
effects of enormous tankers navigating through narrow Canadian territorial
waters. Head Harbor and the Canadian side of Passamaquoddy Bay hold
great importance for the region, with its aquaculture, lobster and fishing
industries, and seasonal tourism (Norris 2005).
The Coming Age of Gas, and Beyond
Concerns over climate change and political instability in the Middle East,
as well as advances in gas-to-liquid technologies, are seen to be driving
the intensity of research and development in the gas sector. As previously
discussed, about three-quarters of global proven gas reserves are in the
former Soviet Union and the Middle East. Due to the political uncertainty
in these regions, it is felt that potential political risk in these areas may not
attract the massive investment needed to develop these industries. This may
provide one explanation for the emergence of Qatar as the Middle Eastern
kingpin of gas, while other areas such as Iran and Saudi Arabia remain
largely untapped (Economist 2004b; Saunders 2006).
In the United States, demand for gas is growing at just below gross
domestic product (GDP) levels, while oil demand growth is less than half
of that. Consumption of gas in that country is predicted to overtake oil as
early as 2015 as Americans seek a flexibility within their energy strategies
to alleviate energy sourcing concerns. In addition, an increasing focus on
climate change will accelerate this move to gas, since emissions from gas
are 25 percent less than from oil, and 50 percent less than from coal (Ling
et al. 2004).
To date, LNG has been the focus of the gas industry in the United
States, with LNG imports projected to increase every year at an average
rate of 8.6 percent. More recently, however, attention has been turning
to gas-to-liquid (GTL) capacity (Box 3.2), notably in the Arabian emirate
of Qatar, which has little oil but an abundance of natural gas. In 2006,
Qatar Petroleum and South Africa’s Sasol opened a GTL facility that
has the capacity to transform Qatar’s abundance of natural gas into a
R
e
g
u
l
a
t
e
d
a
n
d
E
n
e
r
g
y
-
I
n
t
e
n
s
i
v
e
S
e
c
t
o
r
s
69
BOX 3.2 GAS-TO-LIQUID TECHNOLOGIES
AND STRATEGIC DIESEL FUEL
Gas-to-liquid (GTL) is a refinery process designed to convert natural
gas or other gaseous hydrocarbons into longer-chain hydrocarbons.
The GTL Fischer Tropsch process can produce a high-quality diesel
fuel from natural gases, coal, and biomass. Using such processes,
refineries can convert some of their waste products into valuable fuel
oils, which can be sold as, or blended with, diesel fuel. This process is
becoming increasingly significant as crude oil resources are depleted,
while natural gas supplies are projected to last another 60 years. In
addition, GTL fuel can be blended with noncompliant California Air
Resources Board (CARB) diesel fuels to comply with more stringent
diesel standards in regions such as California.
Source: Economist 2006d.
synthetic fuel similar to diesel. GTL diesel has a number of advantages
over LNG: Vehicles can run on it, it does not require as much dedicated
infrastructure as LNG, it is cheaper to ship than natural gas, and it can
be shipped in normal tankers and unloaded at ordinary ports (Economist
2006d). Although the GTL industry is in its infancy, recent data regarding
this middle-distillate process suggests that GTL could challenge traditional
oil refinery production. In addition, GTL’s capability of producing nearly
zero sulfur transportation diesel could accelerate the oil-to-gas transition.
Thus, companies that dominate the global gas industry will have a distinct
advantage in the markets in the near future (Ling et al. 2004).
In the longer term, the focus of development in energy sources will
be in the area of renewables from wind, solar power, wave, and biomass,
as outlined in Chapter 2. At present, wind is the renewable source that is
most economically viable. However, many energy companies have already
made substantial investments in a variety of renewable energy projects, in
response to both national and regional policy initiatives.
In the EU, the United Kingdom requires 10 percent of U.K. electricity
to be supplied by renewable sources by 2010.
The sustainable energy industry in Australia is growing at about 25
percent per year (Innovest Strategic Value Advisors 2004).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested